Appendix B

Speaker Biographical Sketches

Juma Assiago is an urban safety and youth expert with UN HABITAT. He joined UN HABITAT in 1999, working in the area of urban safety and youth programming. He is tasked with assisting governments and other city stakeholders in building capacities at the city level to adequately address urban insecurity and to contribute to the establishment of a culture of prevention in developing countries. He has served in various United Nations interagency coordinating processes and technically supported various international youth crime prevention and governance processes. He also is involved in developing youth safety tools and approaches in urban contexts. His main thematic area of focus is on the use of social, institutional, and sit-uational crime prevention measures to reduce youth crime and delinquency in cities. He has participated and presented papers in several international conferences on youth and children empowerment. Mr. Assiago currently is involved in the strategic planning process of the Safer Cities Programme, which, among others, is defining the key role of the police in urban development and developing a network structure that takes into consideration the governance of safety and safety in public spaces.

Theresa Betancourt, Sc.D., M.A., is assistant professor of child health and human rights in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Betancourt is a member of the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, where she directs the Research Program on Children and Global Adversity. Her central research interests focus on the developmental and psychosocial consequences of concentrated adversity on children and families, resilience



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Appendix B Speaker Biographical Sketches Juma Assiago is an urban safety and youth expert with UN HABITAT. He joined UN HABITAT in 1999, working in the area of urban safety and youth programming. He is tasked with assisting governments and other city stakeholders in building capacities at the city level to adequately ad- dress urban insecurity and to contribute to the establishment of a culture of prevention in developing countries. He has served in various United Na- tions interagency coordinating processes and technically supported various international youth crime prevention and governance processes. He also is involved in developing youth safety tools and approaches in urban contexts. His main thematic area of focus is on the use of social, institutional, and sit- uational crime prevention measures to reduce youth crime and delinquency in cities. He has participated and presented papers in several international conferences on youth and children empowerment. Mr. Assiago currently is involved in the strategic planning process of the Safer Cities Programme, which, among others, is defining the key role of the police in urban develop- ment and developing a network structure that takes into consideration the governance of safety and safety in public spaces. Theresa Betancourt, Sc.D., M.A., is assistant professor of child health and human rights in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Betancourt is a member of the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, where she directs the Research Program on Children and Global Adversity. Her central research interests focus on the developmental and psychosocial consequences of concentrated adversity on children and families, resilience 147

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148 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE and protective processes in child mental health, health and human rights, and cross-cultural mental health research. She is the principal investigator of a prospective longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone and is leading a mixed-methods study in Rwanda to develop and test family-strengthening interventions for HIV/AIDS-affected youth, conducted in collaboration with Partners in Health. In addition, she is working with colleagues at Children’s Hospital Boston to study strengths and sources of resilience in Somali refugee children and families resettled in the United States. Previously, Dr. Betancourt worked as a mental health clinician in both school and community settings and consulted on global children’s mental health issues for various international nongovernmental organiza- tions (NGOs) and UN agencies. She has extensive experience in conducting research among children and families in low-resource settings, particularly in the context of humanitarian emergencies. In 2007, Dr Betancourt was awarded a K01 Career Development Award from the U.S. National Insti- tute of Mental Health to study modifiable protective processes in the mental health of refugee children and adolescents. Arturo Cervantes Trejo, M.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.H., serves as technical sec- retary of the National Council for Injury Prevention and general director of the National Center for Injury Prevention of the Mexican Ministry of Health. He also holds the Carlos Peralta Quintero Chair of Public Health at the Faculty of Medicine of Anahuac University in Mexico. He is board certified by the National Council of Public Health in Mexico and is a mem- ber of the charter class of the National Board of Public Health Examiners in the United States. As head of the National Center for Injury Prevention, Dr. Cervantes has coauthored the National Specific Action Program for Road Safety, the National Specific Action Program for Violence Prevention, and numerous analyses of morbidity and mortality from external causes of injury for the country. Currently, he participates in the presidential task force Todos Somos Juárez, a strategy for violence prevention and social development for the city of Ciudad Juárez. Todos Somos Juárez is led by the federal government with the participation of the government of the state of Chihuahua, the municipal government of Juárez, and the city’s civil society. The strategy includes 160 policy actions in health, labor, education, culture, economic, and security areas undertaken to address the underlying social and economic issues that fuel crime and insecurity in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico’s eighth largest city and the most populous city on the Mexico-U.S. border. Philip J. Cook, Ph.D., is a senior associate dean for faculty and research, professor of economics and sociology, and ITT/Sanford Professor of Public Policy at Duke University. He has twice served as director and chair of

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149 APPENDIX B Duke’s Sanford Institute of Public Policy. He has served as consultant to the U.S. Department of Justice (Criminal Division) and to the Department of Treasury (Enforcement Division). His service with the National Acad- emies includes membership on expert panels dealing with the prevention of alcohol abuse, violence, and school rampage shootings. He is currently a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committee on Law and Justice and was until recently a member of the Division Committee for the Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Dr. Cook is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and an honorary fellow in the American Society of Criminology. Phaedra S. Corso, Ph.D., is head of the Department of Health Policy and Management of the University of Georgia (UGA), where she is also an associate professor. Dr. Corso has considerable public health experience having worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for nearly 15 years before coming to UGA. While at CDC, she served as a management analyst, disease investigation specialist, economic analyst, lead health economist, and prior to joining UGA, as acting chief of the Prevention Development and Evaluation Branch. Her research focuses on the practical application of economic evaluation for setting health policy, specifically related to population-based public health interventions, quality- of-life assessment for vulnerable populations, evaluating preferences for health risks, and violence and injury prevention. e. christi cunningham, J.D., is associate assistant secretary for regulatory affairs at the Department of Labor. Ms. cunningham advises the assistant secretary for policy on policy issues concerning the department’s regula- tions and regulatory agenda. Ms. cunningham manages the regulation production process of the department’s agencies and chairs the Regulatory Council. Ms. cunningham came to the Department of Labor from Howard University School of Law, where she taught a variety of subjects including labor law, equal employment opportunity, administrative law, and torts. She also taught international human rights for several sessions of the law school’s summer program in Cape Town, South Africa. At Howard Law School, Ms. cunningham was the recipient of several awards for teaching and service. In addition to her academic pursuits, Ms. cunningham founded the Community Antiviolence Project (CAP), a nonprofit organization dedi- cated to building coalitions to reduce various forms of violence and to em- power individuals in low-income communities. Ms. cunningham previously was an associate in the New York offices of Debevoise and Plimpton and clerk to the Honorable Constance Baker Motley in the Southern District of New York. She is admitted to the bar in New York and the District of Columbia.

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150 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE For more than 10 years, Rachel Davis, M.S.W., has overseen the develop- ment and implementation of Prevention Institute’s projects related to com- munity health and reducing disparities, violence prevention, and mental health. In addition, she develops community tools, provides consulting and training for various community and government organizations, and advances the conceptual work of the organization. Ms. Davis is project director for UNITY: Urban Networks to Increase Thriving Youth Through Violence Prevention, an initiative funded by the CDC and the California Wellness Foundation to support large cities in implementing and sustain- ing effective preventive approaches to violence and building more mo- mentum for such an approach nationally and in California. Previously, she facilitated a statewide interagency violence prevention partnership in California’s state government; evaluated community-wide violence pre- vention efforts; co-taught a violence prevention graduate course in the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley; and contributed to the Partnerships for Preventing Violence satellite train- ing series through research, script development, facilitator training, and project management. She has also facilitated strategic planning processes resulting in Oxnard, California’s Strategic Action Framework for Empow- ered, Thriving Youth (SAFETY) BluePrint, the Alameda County Violence Prevention Initiative, Cultivating Peace in Salinas, California, and San Mateo County’s Primary Prevention Framework for Behavioral Health. XinQi Dong, M.D., M.P.H., is the Associate Director, Rush Institute for Healthy Aging and an Associate Professor of Medicine, Nursing, and Be- havioral Sciences at the Rush University Medical Center. Having emigrated from China, he has had long standing interests in human rights and social justice issues in vulnerable populations. Dr. Dong’s research focuses on the epidemiological studies of elder abuse in the United States and China, with particular emphasis on its adverse health outcomes and its relationship be- tween psychological and social wellbeing. Dr. Dong currently is an APSA Congressional Policy Fellow/Health and Aging Policy Fellow working with a diverse group of policy leaders at the national, state, and local levels on the issues relevant to elder abuse. He has been working with CDC, NIA, and NAS on the state-of-the-science for the issues of elder abuse. More- over, he has been working with the Chicago Wellbeing Task Force and the Legislative Task Force to revise and ultimately pass the IL Elder Abuse Act. Currently, Dr. Dong serves as a Senior Policy and Research Advisor for the HHS Administration on Aging (AoA) and a Senior Policy Advisor for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Dr. Dong is actively working with Chinese communities to promote understanding and civic engagement on the issues of elder abuse through innovative, culturally, and linguistically appropriate ways. He serves on the Board of Directors for the

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151 APPENDIX B Chinese American Service League, the largest social services organization in the Midwest serving the needs of Chinese population. He is a fellow of the Institute of Medicine of Chicago (IOMC) and a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Global Violence Prevention. Dr. Dong is a Beeson Scholar, and is the recipient of the Nobuo Maeda International Aging and Public Health Research Award, the National Physician Advocacy Merit Award, and the Maxwell A. Pollack Award in productive aging by the Gerontological Society of America. Mindy Thompson Fullilove, M.D., is a research psychiatrist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and professor of clinical psychiatry and public health at Columbia University. She is a board-certified psychiatrist, having received her training at New York Hospital-Westchester Division and Montefiore Hospital. She has conducted research on AIDS and other epidemics of poor communities, with a special interest in the relationship between the collapse of communities and decline in health. Her work on AIDS is featured in Jacob Levenson’s The Secret Epidemic: The Story of AIDS in Black America (Random House, 2004). She is the author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It (Random House, 2004), and The House of Joshua: Meditations on Family and Place (University of Nebraska Press, 1999). Her current work focuses on the connection between urban function and mental health. Elected in 2011, Rodrigo V. Guerrero, M.D., Dr.P.H., once again serves as mayor of Cali, Colombia. Previously, he has held the posts of professor, department head, dean of health sciences, and president at Universidad del Valle in Colombia. In his previous stint as mayor, Dr. Guerrero developed an epidemiological approach to urban violence prevention through the Program DESEPAZ, which has been successfully applied in several cities of Colombia and in other countries. After leaving his first mayoral post, he joined the Pan American Health Organization in Washington, DC, where he started the Violence Prevention Program. Dr. Guerrero has written numer- ous articles on youth violence and violence as a health issue. In addition to his current post as mayor, Dr. Guerrero dedicates his time to Vallenpaz, a nonprofit organization devoted to helping rural communities in conflict- ridden areas of Colombia. He is a member of CISALVA, the Violence Research Center of Universidad del Valle, and the Institute of Medicine. J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., is the endowed professor of prevention and founding director of the Social Development Research Group at the School of Social Work of the University of Washington, Seattle. His research fo- cuses on understanding and preventing child and adolescent health and

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152 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE behavior problems. He develops and tests prevention strategies that seek to reduce risk through the enhancement of strengths and protective fac- tors in families, schools, and communities. He is principal investigator of the Community Youth Development Study, a randomized field experiment involving 24 communities across 7 states testing the effectiveness of the Communities That Care prevention system developed by Dr. Hawkins and Richard F. Catalano. He is a fellow of the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Experimental Criminology and a member of the IOM/ NRC Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Dr. Hawkins has authored numerous articles and several books as well as prevention programs for parents and families, including Guiding Good Choices, Parents Who Care, and Supporting School Success. His prevention work is guided by the social development model, his theory of human behavior. David Hemenway, Ph.D., is an economist and professor at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and a James Marsh Visiting Professor-at-Large at the University of Vermont. Additionally, he is director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center and the Youth Violence Prevention Cen- ter. He was president of the Society for the Advancement of Violence and Injury Research and, in 2007, received the Excellence in Science Award from the Injury Section of the American Public Health Association. He has received fellowships from the Pew, Soros, and Robert Wood Johnson foun- dations. Dr. Hemenway has written more than 150 journal articles and is sole author of 5 books. Recent books include Private Guns Public Health (University of Michigan Press, 2006) and While We Were Sleeping: Success Stories in Injury and Violence Prevention (University of California Press, 2009). Dr. Hemenway has received 10 HSPH teaching awards. L. Rowell Huesmann, Ph.D., M.S., is the Amos N. Tversky Collegiate Pro- fessor of Psychology and Communication Studies and Director of the Re- search Center for Group Dynamics at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research. He is also editor of the journal Aggressive Behavior and past-president of the International Society for Research on Aggres- sion. His research over the past 40 years has focused on the psychological foundations of aggressive and violent behavior and on how predisposing personal factors interact with precipitating situational factors to engender violent behavior. This research has included several life span longitudinal studies showing how the roots of aggressive behavior are often established in childhood. One particular interest has been investigating how children learn through imitation and how children’s exposure to violence in the family, schools, community, and mass media stimulates the development of their own aggressive and violent behavior over time. He has conducted longitudinal studies on the effects of exposure to violence at multiple sites in

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153 APPENDIX B the United States as well as in Finland, Poland, Israel, and Palestine. These studies have shown that simply seeing a lot of violence (political violence, family violence, community violence, media violence) in childhood changes children’s thinking and perceptions, and increases the risk of interpersonal aggressive behavior later in life. He has also conducted research showing that interventions that change children’s beliefs about the appropriateness of conflict and aggression can be effective in preventing aggression. In 2005, Dr. Huesmann was the recipient of the American Psychological Associa- tion’s award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to Media Psychology. In 1990, Ivan Juzang, M.B.A., founded MEE Productions Inc., a unique and groundbreaking research and communications company with offices in Philadelphia, Chicago, and Los Angeles. For the past two decades, Mr. Juzang and his senior management team have tackled some of the toughest social and public health issues across America. Mr. Juzang has become a leading expert in the field of strategic communications and social market- ing, and he has an exceptional knowledge of the public health, social, and educational issues impacting underserved communities. He also special- izes in conducting qualitative research that elicits informative, accurate, and authentic responses, using proprietary focus group research and data analysis methodologies he designed in order to determine the motiva- tion and persuasion techniques that best reach and influence any target population. In collecting and analyzing thousands of hours of qualita- tive, grassroots research, Ivan Juzang has talked to thousands of adults and youth living in underserved communities impacted by violence, grind- ing poverty, and other social issues. His long track record of grassroots community-based research began with MEE’s first groundbreaking report on urban youth culture, The MEE Report: Reaching the Hip-Hop Genera- tion (1992), funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Mr. Juzang also served as principal investigator (PI) for a 10-city sexuality research study that explains how the hip-hop generation navigates its way through sexual situations and responds to today’s sexually explicit media messages, This Is My Reality—The Price of Sex: An Inside Look at Black Urban Youth Sexuality and the Role of Media. He was also a PI on the research that led to the In Search of Love dating violence report and L-Evated: The Blunt Truth, an exploration of marijuana use and abuse in the inner city. Moving Beyond Survival Mode, released in May 2010, is his sixth major research report on urban culture, behavior, and communications. This 2-year research project examined the mental and emotional needs that lead to disastrous choices and behavioral consequences among youth. Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H., joined the Institute of Medicine in July 2003 serving as the director of the Board on Global Health and the Board

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154 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE on African Academy Science Development. Previously he served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemi- ologist, and program manager. In his last Department of Defense (DoD) position, Dr. Kelley founded and directed the presidentially mandated DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS). This responsibility entailed managing approximately $42 million dollars of emerging infections surveillance, response, training, and capacity-building activities undertaken in partnership with numerous elements of the fed- eral government and with health ministries in more than 45 developing countries. He also designed and established the DoD Accessions Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity, the first systematic DoD effort to apply epidemiology to the evidence-based development and evaluation of physical and psychological accession standards. Dr. Kelley is an experienced communicator having lectured in more than 20 countries and authored more than 50 scholarly papers and book chapters. He also designed and served as the specialty editor for the two-volume textbook entitled Military Preventive Medicine: Mobilization and Deployment. Dr. Kelley obtained his M.D. from the University of Virginia and his Dr.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Aslihan Kes, M.S., is a specialist at the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) where she is currently working on a research study in Kenya exploring the economic and social costs of poor maternal health for women and their households, as well as on a series of projects that focus on gender and agricultural development in sub-Saharan Africa. Ms. Kes has also been involved in a number of studies that examine various dimensions of women’s asset rights in sub-Saharan Africa and their effect on women and their households’ well-being. At ICRW she coauthored (with Caren Grown and Geeta Rao Gupta) Taking Action: Achieving Gen- der Equality and Empowering Women (Earthscan Press, 2005) and (with Hema Swaminathan) “Gender and Time Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa” (in Gender, Time Use and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa, edited by Mark Blackden and Quentin Wodon). Stephen Lewis is board chair of the Stephen Lewis Foundation, distinguished visiting professor at Ryerson University, and co-founder and co-director of AIDS-Free World. He is a member of the board of directors of the Clinton Health Access Initiative and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative. He also serves as a commissioner on the newly formed Global Commission on HIV and the Law, created by United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) with the support of Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). Mr. Lewis’s work with the United Nations (UN) spanned more than two decades. He has served as the UN secretary-general’s special envoy

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155 APPENDIX B for HIV/AIDS in Africa and deputy executive director of the United Na- tions Children’s Fund (UNICEF) at the organization’s global headquarters in New York. Mr. Lewis is the author of the best-selling book Race Against Time (House of Anansi Press, 2005). He holds 32 honorary degrees from Canadian universities, and in June 2010 he received an honorary degree from Dartmouth College. In 2003, Mr. Lewis was appointed a companion of the Order of Canada, Canada’s highest honor for lifetime achievement. He was awarded the Pearson Peace Medal in 2004 by the UN Association in Canada; the award celebrates outstanding achievement in the field of international service and understanding. In 2007, King Letsie III, monarch of the Kingdom of Lesotho (a small mountainous country in Southern Africa), invested Mr. Lewis as a knight commander of the Most Dignified Order of Moshoeshoe. Gary Milante, Ph.D., came to the World Bank in 2003 as a researcher, focusing on the causes and impacts of conflict and fragility as well as on effective post-conflict recovery. His interests are in applied game theory and modeling the political economy of peaceful compromise. Before joining the World Development Report 2011 team, Dr. Milante held a joint position in the Development Economics Research Group and the bank’s Fragile and Conflict Affected Countries Group. He led the bank’s “Peace and Devel- opment” research project focusing on successful post-conflict economic recovery through effective power-sharing arrangements, political systems, and macroeconomic policy. He has conducted research in Sudan and has recently written on the upcoming referendum. Additionally, he manages research projects on landmines and geography-of-conflict data, has written on the Arab “democracy deficit,” and was a guest editor for a special edi- tion on post-conflict transitions for the Journal of Peace Research. Peggy Murray, Ph.D., M.S.W., is senior adviser for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (IAAA) and is responsible for IAAA’s research translation initiatives in health professions education. She also serves as an adjunct professor at the Catholic University School of Social Work. She is coauthor of A Medical Education Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Alcohol-Use Disorders, a 20-module cur- riculum and faculty development course for medical school faculty in the primary care specialties. The model has been translated into five languages and implemented in eight countries to date. The relationship of alcohol misuse to aggressive behavior and violence is a complex one, and research has shown that this relationship is more than associative. In addition to alcohol misuse promoting aggressive behavior, victimization as a result of violence can lead to excessive alcohol consumption. Strategies to prevent violence must take this into account and, to be effective, must deal with the

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156 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE alcohol use of both the perpetrators and the victims of violence. Alcohol affects the person and behavior at many levels from the cell, to the brain, to the individual as a whole, to particular neighborhoods and micro cultures, to the global society. For more than 20 years, Dr. Murray has worked at the IAAA in positions that have led to collaboration with scientists across all of its divisions and offices. She hopes to bring a broad perspective on alcohol misuse to the identification of effective approaches to global vio- lence prevention. Michael Phillips, M.D., M.P.H., is currently director of the Suicide Re- search and Prevention Center of the Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, executive director of the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Research and Training in Suicide Prevention at Beijing Hui Long Guan Hospital, professor of psychiatry and global health at Emory University, professor of clinical psychiatry and clinical epide- miology at Columbia University, vice chairperson of the Chinese Society for Injury Prevention and Control, and treasurer of the International As- sociation for Suicide Prevention. He is currently the principal investigator on a number of multicenter collaborative projects on suicide, depression, and schizophrenia. His recent publications include “Repetition of Suicide Attempts: Data from Emergency Care Settings in Five Culturally Different Low- and Middle-Income Countries Participating in the WHO SUPRE- MISS Study” (Crisis, 2010) and “Nonfatal Suicidal Behavior Among Chi- nese Women Who Have Been Physically Abused by Their Male Intimate Partners” (Suicide Life-Threatening Behavior, 2009). Dr. Phillips is a Cana- dian citizen who has been a permanent resident of China for more than 25 years. He runs a number of research training courses each year; supervises Chinese and foreign graduate students; helps coordinate WHO mental health activities in China; promotes increased awareness of the importance of addressing China’s huge suicide problem; and advocates improving the quality, comprehensiveness, and access to mental health services around the country. Deborah Prothrow-Stith, M.D., specializes in senior-level searches for ac- ademic medical centers, public health schools, healthcare systems, and hospitals as a member of Spencer Stuart’s Life Sciences Practice. Prior to joining Spencer Stuart, Dr. Prothrow-Stith was associate dean and profes- sor of public health practice at the Harvard School of Public Health. She is recognized as one of the creators of a nationwide social movement to prevent violence and is the coauthor of Deadly Consequences (Harper Perennial, 1993, with Michaele Weissman), the first book to present the public health perspective on the topic to a mass audience; Sugar and Spice and No Longer Nice (Jossey-Bass, 2005); Murder Is No Accident

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157 APPENDIX B (Jossey-Bass, 2004); and Health Skills for Wellness (Prentice Hall, 2001), a state-of-the-art high school health text. As a board-certified internist, Dr. Prothrow-Stith has extensive clinical experience including service as attend- ing physician at Boston City Hospital and chief of the Adolescent Clinic at Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center. In addition to 10 honorary doctorates, Dr. Prothrow-Stith has received the 1993 World Health Day Award, the 1989 Secretary of Health and Human Services Award, and a presidential appointment to the National Commission on Crime Control and Prevention. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P., is executive director of the Task Force for Global Health. Previously, for 20 years, Dr. Rosenberg was at the CDC, where he led its work in violence prevention and later became the first per- manent director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. He also held the position of the special assistant for behavioral science in the Office of the Deputy Director (HIV/AIDS). Dr. Rosenberg is board certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine with training in public policy. He is on the faculty at Morehouse Medical School, Emory Medical School, and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Rosenberg’s research and programmatic interests are concentrated on injury control and violence prevention, HIV/AIDS, and child well-being, with special attention to behavioral sciences, evaluation, and health communica- tions. He has authored more than 120 publications and recently coauthored the book Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed (University of California Press, 2010). Dr. Rosenberg has received numer- ous awards including the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Rosenberg’s organization, the Task Force for Global Health, participated in the IOM-sponsored work- shop Violence Prevention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Finding a Place on the Global Agenda, and the Task Force remains interested in helping to continue the momentum of the workshop through the Forum on Global Violence Prevention. The Task Force is heavily involved the de- livery of a number of global health programs and sees many ways in which interpersonal violence and conflict exacerbate serious health problems and inequities. Working on drug policy issues for more than 16 years, Kevin A. Sabet, Ph.D., currently serves in the Obama Administration as the special adviser for policy and strategic planning at the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). In this position, Dr. Sabet advises the ONDCP director on all matters affecting priorities, policies, and programs of the National Drug Control Strategy. He worked on policy and speech- writing at ONDCP in 2000, and from 2003 to 2004, he worked for the

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158 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE Clinton and Bush Administrations. Dr. Sabet has published widely in peer- reviewed journals and books on the topics of marijuana policy, cocaine sentencing, legalization, medical marijuana, addiction treatment, and other issues. He is a regular contributor to editorial pages and the television news media, including the Washington Post, New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, CNN, CNBC, and more than a dozen other media outlets. Dr. Sabet first offered testimony on drug policy to the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee in 1996. Before joining ONDCP in 2009, Dr. Sabet consulted in a private capacity on drug policy initiatives for the United Nations, local governments, and various nonprofit organizations. Dr. Sabet is the founder of two antidrug coalitions and has keynoted major antidrug conferences and professional meetings in Brunei, Canada, Ecuador, Italy, Lithuania, Macau, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and other countries. Jack P. Shonkoff, M.D., is the Julius B. Richmond FAMRI Professor of Child Health and Development at the Harvard School of Public Health and the Harvard Graduate School of Education; professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital Boston; and director of the university-wide Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. He also chairs the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, a multi-university collaboration comprising leading scholars in neuroscience, psychology, pediatrics, and economics, whose mission is to bring credible science to bear on policy affecting young children. Under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Shonkoff chaired a blue-ribbon committee that produced a landmark report titled From Neurons to Neigh- borhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development. He has authored more than 150 publications and has received multiple professional honors, including elected membership to the IOM of the National Academy of Sciences, the C. Anderson Aldrich Award in Child Development from the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Distinguished Contributions to Social Policy Award from the Society for Research in Child Development. Pamela B. Teaster, Ph.D., is director of the Graduate Center for Gerontol- ogy, chairperson of the Department of Gerontology, associate dean for research, and professor at the College of Public Health at the University of Kentucky (KY). She serves on the editorial board of the Gerontologist, the Journal of Applied Gerontology, and the Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect. She is president of the KY Guardianship Association, director of the KY Justice Center for Elders and Vulnerable Adults, a member of the Task Force on Older Adult Ministries for the National Episcopal Church, and immediate past president of the National Committee for the Preven- tion of Elder Abuse. She has served on the National Academy of Sciences’

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159 APPENDIX B Committee on Social Security and Representative Payees, the American Bar Association’s Commission on Law and Aging, and the Center for Guardianship Certification. She is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, a recipient of the Rosalie Wolf Award for Research on Elder Abuse (National Association of Adult Protective Services), the Outstand- ing Affiliate Member Award (Kentucky Guardianship Association), and the Distinguished Educator Award (Kentucky Association for Gerontology). She is the author of Public Guardianship After 25 Years: In the Best Inter- ests of Incapacitated People? (Praeger, 2010). Elizabeth Ward, M.B.B.S., M.Sc., is a medical epidemiologist with years of public health experience in the Jamaican government health system. Dr. Ward is a consultant at the Institute of Public Safety and Justice at the Uni- versity of the West Indies and chair of the board of directors of the Violence Prevention Alliance Jamaica. She was formerly the director of disease pre- vention and control of the Health Promotion and Protection Division in the Ministry of Health. She has coordinated program development, research, and data analysis and has been responsible for disease prevention and con- trol. She spearheaded the development of the Jamaica Injury Surveillance System, which tracks hospital-based injuries island-wide. Additionally, Dr. Ward has contributed to the development of Jamaician government policies as a task force member for the National Security Strategy for Safe Schools and as a member of the working groups for the Security Component of the National Development Plan, the National Strategic Plan for Children and Violence, and the Strategic Plan for Healthy Lifestyles. Hugh Waters, M.D., Ph.D., is a senior health specialist with Rand Health. He has 22 years’ experience working with public health programs and has expertise in the areas of (1) health insurance and health financing re- forms; (2) evaluation of the effects of health financing mechanisms on ac- cess, equity, and quality; and (3) economic evaluation of health programs. He speaks French and Spanish fluently and has worked in more than 30 countries. Dr. Waters is a coeditor of the book Good Practices in Health Financing, published in 2008 by the World Bank, and the author of several chapters in this book, which contains a series of case studies of health in- surance in low- and middle-income countries and draws lessons from these experiences. Dr. Waters has lived and worked in Kenya, Cameroon, and Peru and has worked on a short-term basis on health projects in numerous countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. He teaches a course entitled “Comparative Health Insurance” at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

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160 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE Michael Wells, Ph.D., is a federal project officer with the Safe Schools Healthy Students Initiative of the Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools at the Department of Education, where he also has served as a research analyst and grants manager. Before joining the Department of Education in 2005, Dr. Wells was director of the Safe Schools-Healthy Students Initiative for Stokes County Schools in North Carolina. A psychologist by training, Dr. Wells has specialized in administering programs for and counseling at-risk middle and high school students. He is a licensed counselor.