Appendix C

Planning Committee Biographical Sketches

Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P. (Chair), is executive director of the Task Force for Global Health. Previously, for 20 years, Dr. Rosenberg was at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he led its work in violence prevention and later became the first permanent director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. He also held the position of the special assistant for behavioral science in the Office of the Deputy Director (HIV/AIDS). Dr. Rosenberg is board certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine with training in public policy. He is on the faculty at Morehouse Medical School, Emory Medical School, and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Rosenberg’s research and programmatic interests are concentrated on injury control and violence prevention, HIV/AIDS, and child well-being, with special attention to behavioral sciences, evaluation, and health communications. He has authored more than 120 publications and recently coauthored the book Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed (University of California Press, 2010). Dr. Rosenberg has received numerous awards including the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and his organization, the Task Force for Global Health, participated in the IOM-sponsored workshop Violence Prevention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Finding a Place on the Global Agenda. The Task Force remains interested in helping to continue the momentum of this workshop through the Forum on Global Violence Prevention. The Task Force is heavily involved the delivery of a number of global health programs and sees many ways in which interpersonal violence and conflict exacerbate serious health problems and inequities.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 161
Appendix C Planning Committee Biographical Sketches Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P. (Chair), is executive director of the Task Force for Global Health. Previously, for 20 years, Dr. Rosenberg was at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he led its work in violence prevention and later became the first permanent director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. He also held the position of the special assistant for behavioral science in the Office of the Deputy Director (HIV/AIDS). Dr. Rosenberg is board certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine with training in public policy. He is on the faculty at Morehouse Medical School, Emory Medical School, and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Rosenberg’s re- search and programmatic interests are concentrated on injury control and violence prevention, HIV/AIDS, and child well-being, with special attention to behavioral sciences, evaluation, and health communications. He has au- thored more than 120 publications and recently coauthored the book Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed (University of California Press, 2010). Dr. Rosenberg has received numerous awards including the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and his organization, the Task Force for Global Health, participated in the IOM-sponsored workshop Violence Prevention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Finding a Place on the Global Agenda. The Task Force remains interested in helping to continue the momentum of this workshop through the Forum on Global Violence Prevention. The Task Force is heavily involved the delivery of a number of global health programs and sees many ways in which interpersonal violence and conflict exacerbate serious health problems and inequities. 161

OCR for page 161
162 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE Mindy Thompson Fullilove, M.D., is a research psychiatrist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and professor of clinical psychiatry and public health at Columbia University. She is a board-certified psychiatrist, having received her training at New York Hospital-Westchester Division and Montefiore Hospital. She has conducted research on AIDS and other epidemics of poor communities, with a special interest in the relationship between the collapse of communities and decline in health. Her work in AIDS is featured in Jacob Levenson’s The Secret Epidemic: The Story of AIDS in Black America (Random House, 2004). She is the author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It (Random House, 2004) and The House of Joshua: Meditations on Family and Place (University of Nebraska Press, 1999). Her current work focuses on the connection between urban function and mental health. Peggy Murray, Ph.D., M.S.W., is senior adviser for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (IAAA) and is responsible for IAAA’s research translation initiatives in health professions education. She also serves as an adjunct professor at the Catholic University School of Social Work. She is coauthor of A Medical Education Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Alcohol-Use Disorders, a 20-module cur- riculum and faculty development course for medical school faculty in the primary care specialties. The model has been translated into five languages and implemented in eight countries to date. The relationship of alcohol misuse to aggressive behavior and violence is a complex one, and research has shown that this relationship is more than associative. In addition to alcohol misuse promoting aggressive behavior, victimization as a result of violence can lead to excessive alcohol consump- tion. Strategies to prevent violence must take this into account and, to be effective, must deal with the alcohol use of both the perpetrators and the victims of violence. Alcohol affects the person and behavior at many lev- els from the cell, to the brain, to the individual as a whole, to particular neighborhoods and micro cultures, to the global society. For more than 20 years, Dr. Murray has worked at the IAAA in positions that have led to collaboration with scientists across all of its divisions and offices. She hopes to bring a broad perspective on alcohol misuse to the identification of effective approaches to global violence prevention. Pamela B. Teaster, Ph.D., is director of the Graduate Center for Gerontol- ogy, chairperson of the Department of Gerontology, associate dean for research, and professor at the College of Public Health at the University of Kentucky (KY). She serves on the editorial board of the Gerontologist, the Journal of Applied Gerontology, and the Journal of Elder Abuse and

OCR for page 161
163 APPENDIX C Neglect. She is president of the KY Guardianship Association, director of the KY Justice Center for Elders and Vulnerable Adults, member of the Task Force on Older Adult Ministries for the National Episcopal Church, and immediate past president of the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse. She has served on the National Academy of Sciences’ Commit- tee on Social Security and Representative Payees, the American Bar Asso- ciation’s Commission on Law and Aging, and the Center for Guardianship Certification. She is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and a recipient of the Rosalie Wolf Award for Research on Elder Abuse (National Association of Adult Protective Services), the Outstanding Affiliate Member Award (Kentucky Guardianship Association), and the Distinguished Edu- cator Award (Kentucky Association for Gerontology). She is the author of Public Guardianship After 25 Years: In the Best Interests of Incapacitated People? (Praeger, 2010). Elizabeth Ward, M.B.B.S., M.Sc., is a medical epidemiologist with years of public health experience in the Jamaican government health system. Dr. Ward is a consultant at the Institute of Public Safety and Justice at the Uni- versity of the West Indies and chair of the board of directors of the Violence Prevention Alliance Jamaica. She was formerly the director of disease pre- vention and control of the Health Promotion and Protection Division in the Ministry of Health. She has coordinated program development, research, and data analysis and has been responsible for disease prevention and con- trol. She spearheaded the development of the Jamaica Injury Surveillance System, which tracks hospital-based injuries island-wide. Additionally, Dr. Ward has contributed to the development of Jamaican government policies as a task force member for the National Security Strategy for Safe Schools and as a member of the working groups for the Security Component of the National Development Plan, the National Strategic Plan for Children and Violence, and the Strategic Plan for Healthy Lifestyles.