C

Information-Gathering Agendas

May 26, 2011

Keck Center, Room 109
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

BACKGROUND AND OVERVIEW

Session Objectives: Obtain a better understanding of the background to the study and the charge to the committee. Receive a briefing from NIH about existing areas of science where chimpanzee research is supported. Hear from stakeholders about the use of chimpanzees in research, as specifically related to the committee’s charge.

1:00 p.m.           Welcome and Introductions

JOHN STOBO, Committee Chair

Senior Vice President

Health Sciences and Services

University of California System

1:10 p.m.           Background and Charge to the Committee

SALLY ROCKEY

Deputy Director for Extramural Research

National Institutes of Health



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C Information-Gathering Agendas May 26, 2011 Keck Center, Room 109 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 BACKGROUND AND OVERVIEW Session Objectives: Obtain a better understanding of the background to the study and the charge to the committee. Receive a briefing from NIH about existing areas of science where chimpanzee research is supported. Hear from stakeholders about the use of chimpanzees in research, as specifically related to the committee’s charge. 1:00 p.m. Welcome and Introductions JOHN STOBO, Committee Chair Senior Vice President Health Sciences and Services University of California System 1:10 p.m. Background and Charge to the Committee SALLY ROCKEY Deputy Director for Extramural Research National Institutes of Health 167

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168 ASSESSING THE NECESSITY OF THE CHIMPANZEE 1:30 p.m. Committee Discussion with Sponsor JOHN STOBO, Committee Chair Senior Vice President Health Sciences and Services University of California System 2:15 p.m. NIH-Supported Chimpanzee Biomedical Research HAROLD WATSON Deputy Director Division of Comparative Medicine National Center for Research Resources, NIH 2:35 p.m. Discussion with the Committee 2:45 p.m. BREAK 3:15 p.m. NIH-Supported Chimpanzee Behavioral Research RICHARD NAKAMURA Scientific Director National Institute of Mental Health, NIH 3:35 p.m. Discussion with the Committee 3:45 p.m. Panel Discussion: Is there a continued need for chimpanzee research? JOHN PIPPIN Senior Medical and Research Adviser Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine JARROD BAILEY Science Director New England Anti-Vivisection Society

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169 APPENDIX C KEVIN KREGEL Professor, Departments of Integrative Physiology and Radiation Oncology University of Iowa Chair, Animal Issues Committee Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology 4:15 p.m. Discussion with the Committee 4:45 p.m. ADJOURN __________________________________________________________ August 11, 2011 Keck Center, Room 100 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 Meeting Objectives: • To obtain background data on the current use of chimpanzees in biomedical and behavioral research. • To explore potential alternative models to chimpanzees. • To seek public comment about the scientific need for chimpanzees in biomedical and behavioral research. 8:00 a.m. Welcome and Meeting Objectives JEFFREY KAHN, Committee Chair Director and Professor Maas Family Endowed Chair in Bioethics Center for Bioethics University of Minnesota

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170 ASSESSING THE NECESSITY OF THE CHIMPANZEE SESSION I: THE CHIMPANZEE Session Objectives: Understand chimpanzee behavior and genetics and their role in biomedical research. Compare chimpanzees both to other models and to humans. Explore the usefulness of the chimpanzee as a model for biomedical and behavioral research, specifically for understanding human diseases and disorders. Discuss what scientific alternatives exist should the chimpanzee no longer be an available model. JAY KAPLAN, Session Chair Professor of Pathology (Comparative Medicine), Translational Science and Anthropology Wake Forest University Primate Center and Wake Forest Translational Science Institute Wake Forest School of Medicine 8:10 a.m. Chimpanzee Behavior FRANS DE WAAL C.H. Candler Professor of Primate Behavior Department of Psychology Emory University 8:30 a.m. Chimpanzee Genetics JEFFREY ROGERS Associate Professor Department of Molecular and Human Genetics Baylor College of Medicine 8:50 a.m. Chimpanzee Biomedical Research ROBERT PURCELL Chief, Hepatitis Viruses Section Laboratory of Infectious Diseases National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

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171 APPENDIX C 9:10 a.m. Panel Discussion with Committee • What scientific alternatives exist should the chimpanzee no longer be an available model? 9:40 a.m. BREAK SESSION II: BEHAVIORAL RESEARCH Session Objective: Review current use of chimpanzees for behavioral research. Explore alternative models also used in this research area. ROBERT SAPOLSKY, Session Chair Professor of Biology, Neurology and Neurological Sciences Stanford University 9:50 a.m. PANELISTS [15 min/talk] Chimpanzee Social Behavior and Communication WILLIAM HOPKINS Professor Department of Psychology Agnes Scott College Chimpanzee Learning and Memory CHARLES MENZEL Senior Research Scientist Language Research Center Georgia State University Potential for Non-Human Primates in Behavioral Research MARK MOSS Professor and Chair Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology Boston University

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172 ASSESSING THE NECESSITY OF THE CHIMPANZEE Chimpanzee Research in Zoos and Sanctuaries BRIAN HARE Assistant Professor Department of Evolutionary Anthropology Duke University 10:50 a.m. Panel Discussion with Committee • What scientific alternatives exist should the chimpanzee no longer be an available model? • How long would it take for science to catch up if the chimpanzee were no longer available? SESSION III: PUBLIC COMMENT Session Objectives: Seek public comment from interested stakeholders about the continued and potential future need for chimpanzees in biomedical and behavioral research. NOTE: To accommodate requests, speakers will be strictly limited to 3 minutes. JEFFREY KAHN, Committee Chair Director and Professor Maas Family Endowed Chair in Bioethics Center for Bioethics University of Minnesota 11:20 a.m. Public Comments ALICE RA’ANAN Director of Government Affairs and Science Policy The American Physiological Society ANNE DESCHAMPS Science Policy Analyst Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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173 APPENDIX C JUSTIN GOODMAN Associate Director People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals LAURA BONAR Program Director Animal Protection of New Mexico STEPHEN ROSS Assistant Director, Lester Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes Lincoln Park Zoo RAIJA BETTAUER Bettauer BioMed Research PAMELA OSENKOWSKI Director of Science Programs National Anti-Vivisection Society SUE LEARY President Alternatives Research & Development Foundation THEODORA CAPALDO President/Executive Director New England Anti-Vivisection Society/Project Release & Restitution ERIC KLEIMAN Research Director In Defense of Animals RYAN MERKLEY Associate Director of Research Policy Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine MATTHEW BAILEY Vice President National Association for Biomedical Research

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174 ASSESSING THE NECESSITY OF THE CHIMPANZEE JOSEPH ERWIN Consulting Primatologist KATHLEEN CONLEE Director of Program Management The Humane Society of the United States BETH CATALDO Director Cetacean Society USA CATHY LISS President Animal Welfare Institute DAVID DEGRAZIA Professor of Philosophy George Washington University C. JAMES MAHONEY Research Professor New York University School of Medicine 12:20 p.m. LUNCH SPECIAL LECTURE 1:00 p.m. Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research JANE GOODALL (via video conference) Founder Jane Goodall Institute 1:30 p.m. Discussion with Committee

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175 APPENDIX C SESSION IV: HEPATITIS Session Objectives: Review the role of chimpanzees in hepatitis research. Explore alternative models also used in this research area. DIANE GRIFFIN, Session Chair Professor and Chair Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 1:40 p.m. PANELISTS [15 min/talk] The Current State of Hepatitis Research ROBERT LANFORD Scientist Department of Virology and Immunology Texas Biomedical Research Institute The Next Drug for Hepatitis B and C CHRISTOPHER WALKER Professor of Pediatrics Nationwide Children’s Hospital The Ohio State University Cellular and Molecular Technique Advances in Hepatitis Research STANLEY LEMON Professor of Medicine Division of Infectious Diseases University of North Carolina School of Medicine

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176 ASSESSING THE NECESSITY OF THE CHIMPANZEE Humanized Mice for the Study of Human Infectious Diseases ALEXANDER PLOSS Research Assistant Professor Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease The Rockefeller University From Chimpanzee to Human—Translational Research in Viral Hepatitis EUGENE SCHIFF Leonard Miller Professor of Medicine Director, Schiff Liver Institute/Center for Liver Disease University of Miami Medical School 2:55 p.m. Panel Discussion with Committee • What scientific alternatives exist should the chimpanzee no longer be an available model? • How long would it take for science to catch up if the chimpanzee were no longer available? 3:40 p.m. BREAK SESSION V: INFECTIOUS DISEASES Session Objectives: Review the role of chimpanzees in infectious disease research. Explore alternative models also used in this research area. JOHN BARTLETT, Session Chair Professor Department of Medicine Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 4:00 p.m. PANELISTS [15 min/talk] The Role of Chimpanzees in HIV Research NANCY HAIGWOOD Professor of Microbiology and Immunology Director Oregon National Primate Research Center

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177 APPENDIX C The Role of Chimpanzees in RSV Research PETER COLLINS Director RNA Viruses Section National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Current Experimental Models for Malaria Vaccine Development ANN-MARIE CRUZ Program Officer, Research and Development PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative Monoclonal Antibody Therapeutics THERESA REYNOLDS Director Safety Assessment Genentech Alternative Models for Infectious Disease Research ROBERT HAMATAKE Director of HCV Biology GlaxoSmithKline 5:15 p.m. Panel Discussion with Committee • What scientific alternatives exist should the chimpanzee no longer be an available model? • How long would it take for science to catch up if the chimpanzee were no longer available? 6:00 p.m. ADJOURN

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178 ASSESSING THE NECESSITY OF THE CHIMPANZEE August 12, 2011 Keck Center, Room 100 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 Meeting Objectives: • To obtain background data on the current use of chimpanzees in biomedical and behavioral research • To explore potential alternative models to chimpanzees • To seek public comment about the scientific need for chimpanzees in biomedical and behavioral research SESSION VI: POTENTIAL FUTURE NEEDS Session Objectives: Explore potential future needs for chimpanzees in biomedical and behavioral research. Consider emerging threats and novel technologies. EDWARD HARLOW, Session Chair Special Assistant to the Director National Cancer Institute 8:30 a.m. PANELISTS [15 min/talk] Surveying the Future of Chimpanzee Research THOMAS J. ROWELL Director New Iberia Research Center University of Louisiana at Lafayettte Is Chimpanzee Research Critical to the Health Security of the United States? JOSEPH BIELITZKI Associate Director Office of Research and Commercialization University of Central Florida

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179 APPENDIX C The Role of Chimpanzees in Biodefense Research— DoD Perspective JAMES SWEARENGEN Director (retired) Comparative Medicine Veterinarian National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center The Role of Chimpanzees in Biodefense Research— NIH Perspective MICHAEL KURILLA Director Office of Biodefense Research Affairs National Institutes of Health 9:45 a.m. Discussion with the Committee • In the event of a public health emergency, what would the consequences be if there were no chimpanzees available for biomedical research? • What would the impact be if chimpanzees were unavailable for testing during drug development and research? • How long would it take for science to catch up if the chimpanzee were no longer available? 10:45 a.m. ADJOURN

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