Appendix A

Glossary

Adverse event—An event resulting in unintended harm to a patient from a medical intervention (IOM, 2004)

Deployment—Phase when a health IT product is initially installed in a health care system

Implementation—Deployment and integration of a health IT product into clinical workflow

Interoperability—Ability for two or more systems or components to exchange information and to use the information that has been exchanged (IEEE, 1990)

Maintenance—Processes for manufacturers and health care organizations to sustain the good working condition of a health IT product and keep versions up to date

Metadata—Data describing attributes of the data themselves

Patient engagement tools—Technologies used primarily by patients to help them track, manage, and take part in their own health care

Performance requirements—A set of criteria delineating what a health IT product should achieve

Quality management principles and practices—A set of principles and practices an organization uses to improve performance and quality



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 179
Appendix A Glossary Adverse event—An event resulting in unintended harm to a patient from a medical intervention (IOM, 2004) Deployment—Phase when a health IT product is initially installed in a health care system Implementation—Deployment and integration of a health IT product into clinical workflow Interoperability—Ability for two or more systems or components to exchange information and to use the information that has been exchanged (IEEE, 1990) Maintenance—Processes for manufacturers and health care organizations to sustain the good working condition of a health IT product and keep versions up to date Metadata—Data describing attributes of the data themselves Patient engagement tools—Technologies used primarily by patients to help them track, manage, and take part in their own health care Performance requirements—A set of criteria delineating what a health IT product should achieve Quality management principles and practices—A set of principles and practices an organization uses to improve performance and quality 179

OCR for page 179
180 HEALTH IT AND PATIENT SAFETY Safe—Avoiding injuries to patients from the care that is intended to help them (IOM, 2001) Sociotechnical systems—A construct identifying the interactions between people, processes, technology, organizations, and environment that influence complex systems Usability—Extent to which a product can be used by specific users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a specific context of use (ISO, 1998) Users—Health professionals, health care organizations, and patients who may actively use health IT products Vendors—Companies that make, sell, and may provide support for health IT products and homegrown systems REFERENCES IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). 1990. IEEE standard computer dictionary: A compilation of IEEE standard computer glossaries. New York: IEEE. IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2001. Crossing the quality chasm: A new health system for the 21st century. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. IOM. 2004. Patient safety: Achieving a new standard for care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. ISO (International Organization for Standardization). 1998. International standard 9241 ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals, part 11: Guidance on usability. Geneva, Switzerland: ISO.