References

Brewer, C., and D. Smith, eds. 2011. Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Ebert-May, D., T. L. Derting, J. Hodder, J. L. Momsen, T. M. Long, and S. E. Jardeleza. 2011. What we say is not what we do: Effective evaluation of faculty professional development programs, BioScience 61(7):550-558.

Handelsman, J., S. Miller, and C. Pfund. 2006. Scientific Teaching. San Francisco: Freeman and Sons.

Knight, J.K., and W. B. Wood. 2005. Teaching more by lecturing less. Cell Biol Educ 4:298-310.

Michael, J. 2006. Where’s the evidence that active learning works? Adv Physiol Educ 30:159-167.

NAE (National Academy of Engineering). 2009. Ethics Education and Scientific and Engineering Research: What’s Been Learned? What Should Be Done? Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

NRC (National Research Council). 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School (Expanded Edition). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

NRC. 2003. BIO2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

NRC. 2004. Biotechnology Research in an Age of Terrorism. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

NRC. 2005. America’s Lab Report: Investigations in High School Science. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

NRC. 2007. Taking Science to School. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

NRC. 2008. Ready, Set, Science! Washington, DC: National Academies Press

NRC. 2009a. On Being A Scientist. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.



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References Brewer, C., and D. Smith, eds. 2011. Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science. Ebert-May, D., T. L. Derting, J. Hodder, J. L. Momsen, T. M. Long, and S. E. Jardeleza. 2011. What we say is not what we do: Effective evaluation of faculty professional development programs, BioScience 61(7):550-558. Handelsman, J., S. Miller, and C. Pfund. 2006. Scientific Teaching. San Francisco: Freeman and Sons. Knight, J.K., and W. B. Wood. 2005. Teaching more by lecturing less. Cell Biol Educ 4:298-310. Michael, J. 2006. Where’s the evidence that active learning works? Adv Physiol Educ 30:159-167. NAE (National Academy of Engineering). 2009. Ethics Education and Scientific and Engineering Research: What’s Been Learned? What Should Be Done? Washington, DC: National Academies Press. NRC (National Research Council). 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School (Expanded Edition). Washington, DC: National Academy Press. NRC. 2003. BIO2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. NRC. 2004. Biotechnology Research in an Age of Terrorism. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. NRC. 2005. America’s Lab Report: Investigations in High School Science. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. NRC. 2007. Taking Science to School. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. NRC. 2008. Ready, Set, Science! Washington, DC: National Academies Press NRC. 2009a. On Being A Scientist. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. 21

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RESEARCH IN THE LIFE SCIENCES WITH DUAL USE POTENTIAL 22 NRC. 2009b. Responsible Research with Biological Select Agents and Toxins. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. NRC. 2010. Challenges and Opportunities for Education about Dual Use Issues in the Life Sciences. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. NRC. 2011a. Promising Practices in Undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education: Summary of Two Workshops. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. NRC. 2011b. A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. NSABB (National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity). 2007. Proposed framework for the oversight of dual use life sciences research: Strategies for minimizing the potential misuse of research information. Available at http://www.biosecurityboard.gov/news.asp. NSABB. 2008. Strategic plan for outreach and education on dual use research issues. Available at http://oba.od.nih.gov/biosecurity/biosecurity_documents.html. Pfund, C., S. Miller, K. Brenner, P. Bruns, A. Chang, D. Ebert-May, A. F. Fagen, J. Gentile, S. Gossens, I. M. Khan, J. B. Labov, C. Mail Pribbenow, M. Susman, L. Tong, R. Wright, R. T. Yuan, W. B. Wood, and J. Handelsman. 2009. Summer institute to improve university science teaching. Science 324:470. Rappert, B., ed. 2010. Education and Ethics in the Life Sciences: Strengthening the Prohibition of Biological Weapons. Canberra: Australian National University E Press. Rappert, B., and C. McLeish, eds. 2007. A Web of Prevention: Biological Weapons, Life Sciences and the Governance of Research. London: Earthscan. Wiggins, G, and J. McTighe. 2005. Understanding by Design, Expanded 2nd ed. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. WHO (World Health Organization). 2006. Biorisk Management: Laboratory Biosecurity Guidance. WHO. 2010. WHO Biorisk Management Advanced Trainer Programme: Concept Sheet. Photocopy.