Appendix E
Examples of Other Networks or Train-the-Trainers Programs
13

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

In 2009 the World Health Organization revamped its Biorisk Management Advanced Training Course to align with a new focus that encompasses both biosafety and laboratory biosecurity (WHO 2006). The new program reflects concepts based on the latest science and theory behind accelerated and adult learning. This highly interactive workshop builds the knowledge and skills of individuals who train and educate others in the biorisk management community. The workshop is intended to increase the number of qualified trainers able to support biorisk management globally (WHO 2010).

Participants in the workshop are expected to have some prior teaching/training experience and to be prepared to carry out at least two training sessions a year in their regions or countries. The first seminar was held in Amman, Jordan, in April 2010, and five more throughout 2010 covered all six of the WHO regions.

BRADFORD DISARMAMENT RESEARCH CENTRE

Another approach to faculty development has been created by the staff of the Disarmament Research Centre of the University of Bradford as part of a broader project on “Dual Use Bioethics.”14 This train-the-trainer program takes advantage of distance learning techniques and advanced videoconferencing capabilities at the university take relatively small groups of faculty through a series of lectures as well as a set of interactive scenarios designed to explore ethical dilemmas related to dual use research.

Working in a fully supported online learning community, participants will be able to communicate and interact with peers, developing their practice through sustained reflection and participation in a range of activities and scenarios. Participants

image

13 The contents of this appendix are largely excerpted from NRC 2010.

14 An overview of the larger project may be found at its website: http://www.dual-usebioethics.net/.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 40
Appendix E Examples of Other Networks or Train-the-Trainers Programs13 WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION In 2009 the World Health Organization revamped its Biorisk Management Advanced Training Course to align with a new focus that encompasses both biosafety and laboratory biosecurity (WHO 2006). The new program reflects concepts based on the latest science and theory behind accelerated and adult learning. This highly interactive workshop builds the knowledge and skills of individuals who train and educate others in the biorisk management community. The workshop is intended to increase the number of qualified trainers able to support biorisk management globally (WHO 2010). Participants in the workshop are expected to have some prior teaching/training experience and to be prepared to carry out at least two training sessions a year in their regions or countries. The first seminar was held in Amman, Jordan, in April 2010, and five more throughout 2010 covered all six of the WHO regions. BRADFORD DISARMAMENT RESEARCH CENTRE Another approach to faculty development has been created by the staff of the Disarmament Research Centre of the University of Bradford as part of a broader project on “Dual Use Bioethics.”14 This train-the-trainer program takes advantage of distance learning techniques and advanced videoconferencing capabilities at the university take relatively small groups of faculty through a series of lectures as well as a set of interactive scenarios designed to explore ethical dilemmas related to dual use research. Working in a fully supported online learning community, participants will be able to communicate and interact with peers, developing their practice through sustained reflection and participation in a range of activities and scenarios. Participants 13 The contents of this appendix are largely excerpted from NRC 2010. An overview of the larger project may be found at its website: http://www.dual-usebioethics.net/. 14 40

OCR for page 40
APPENDIX E 41 will be encouraged to bring their own personal ideas and experiences to the course, sharing these with peers in order to contextualise their knowledge and understanding in ways that will help them meet the ethical challenges thrown up by dual-use (Bradford Disarmament Research Centre website 2011). The program will begin its third cycle in Fall 2011, and has added a shorter course.

OCR for page 40