Appendix D

Committee Biographies

Robert B. Wallace, M.Sc., M.D., is the Irene Ensminger Stecher Professor of epidemiology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa Colleges of Public Health and Medicine, and director of the University’s Center on Aging. He has been a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the National Advisory Council on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), past chair of IOM’s Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and current chair of IOM’s Board on the Health of Select Populations. He is the author or coauthor of over 300 publications and 22 book chapters and has been the editor of 4 books, including the current edition of Maxcy-Rosenau-Last’s Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Wallace’s research interests are in clinical and population epidemiology and focus on the causes and prevention of disabling conditions of older persons. He has had substantial experience in the conduct of both observational cohort studies of older persons and clinical trials, including preventive interventions related to fracture, cancer, coronary disease, and women’s health. He is an investigator in the Health Initiative, a national intervention trial exploring the prevention of breast and colon cancer and coronary disease. He is also a co-principal investigator of the Health and Retirement Study, a national cohort study of the health and economic status of older Americans, and a co-investigator of the National Health and Aging Trends Study, a national cohort study of the causes and prevention of disability among older Americans. Dr. Wallace received an M.Sc. from SUNY Buffalo and his M.D. degree from Northwestern University Medical School.



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Appendix D Committee Biographies Robert B. Wallace, M.Sc., M.D., is the Irene Ensminger Stecher Professor of epidemiology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa Colleges of Public Health and Medicine, and director of the University’s Center on Aging. He has been a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the National Advisory Council on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), past chair of IOM’s Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and current chair of IOM’s Board on the Health of Select Populations. He is the author or coauthor of over 300 publications and 22 book chapters and has been the editor of 4 books, including the current edition of Maxcy- Rosenau-Last’s Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Wallace’s re- search interests are in clinical and population epidemiology and focus on the causes and prevention of disabling conditions of older persons. He has had substantial experience in the conduct of both observational cohort studies of older persons and clinical trials, including preventive interven- tions related to fracture, cancer, coronary disease, and women’s health. He is an investigator in the Health Initiative, a national intervention trial exploring the prevention of breast and colon cancer and coronary disease. He is also a co-principal investigator of the Health and Retirement Study, a national cohort study of the health and economic status of older Ameri- cans, and a co-investigator of the National Health and Aging Trends Study, a national cohort study of the causes and prevention of disability among older Americans. Dr. Wallace received an M.Sc. from SUNY Buffalo and his M.D. degree from Northwestern University Medical School. 323

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324 LIVING WELL WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS Ronald T. Ackermann, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.P., is a general internist, population health researcher, and associate professor of medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He is director of the Community Engaged Research Center at the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute and is considered a national expert in health care–community partnerships to address unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and improve the prevention and control of common chronic ill- nesses such as asthma, congestive heart failure, and diabetes. He is the prin- cipal architect and director of a large ongoing research program to evaluate the feasibility, costs, and effectiveness of partnered approaches for prevent- ing and managing type 2 diabetes. He has also served as a lead evaluation consultant for AHRQ, the Lewin Group, and the Center for Health Care Strategies in a series of learning initiatives designed to improve the imple- mentation and evaluation of disease and care management interventions by both Medicaid and commercial managed care programs in 20 U.S. states. Karen Basen-Engquist, Ph.D., M.P.H., is a professor in the Department of Behavioral Science at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. She received her doctoral degree in psychology from the University of Texas at Austin, and an M.P.H. in health promotion and health education from the University of Texas School of Public Health. Her research focuses on cancer survivors and the role of health behavior interventions in decreasing the severity of late effects of cancer, improving physical functioning, optimizing their quality of life, and reducing their risk of developing other chronic diseases. In particular she has led sev- eral studies of the effect of exercise interventions on physical functioning, symptoms, and cardiovascular health in breast, endometrial, and colorectal cancer survivors. Dr. Basen-Engquist chairs MD Anderson’s working group for cancer survivorship research and in that role is in charge of organizing the development of a survivorship research center, which will provide seed money funding to researchers and provide research symposia on cancer sur- vivorship. In addition, she directs the Patient-Reported Outcomes, Survey, and Population Shared Resource, which provides technical assistance and support for investigators who conduct clinical, behavioral, and survivor- ship research that uses participant-reported outcomes. Dr. Basen-Engquist also chairs MD Anderson’s Comprehensive Cancer Control committee on energy balance and obesity, which involves collaboration with researchers and community members to develop and implement evidence-based popula- tion interventions to increase physical activity and diet quality and decrease obesity in the greater Houston area. Dr. Basen-Engquist also has expertise in both assessment and intervention related to chronic diseases and other problems experienced by cancer survivors.

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325 APPENDIX D Bobbie A. Berkowitz, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is currently the Dean and Mary O’Neil Mundinger Professor of Nursing at Columbia University School of Nursing and senior vice president of the Columbia University Medical Center. She was previously the Alumni Endowed Professor of Nursing and Chair of the Department of Psychosocial and Community Health at the University of Washington School of Nursing and adjunct professor in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine. In addition, she served as a consulting professor with Duke University and the University of Cali- fornia at Davis. Dr. Berkowitz directed the NIH/NINR funded Center for the Advancement of Health Disparities Research and the National Program Office for the RWJF funded Turning Point Initiative. She joined the faculty at the University of Washington after having served as deputy secretary for the Washington State Department of Health and chief of nursing services for the Seattle-King County Department of Public Health. Dr. Berkowitz has been a member of the Washington State Board of Health, the Wash- ington Health Care Commission, the board of the American Academy of Nursing, and chaired the Board of Trustees of Group Health Cooperative. She serves on a number of editorial boards, including the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, and American Journal of Public Health, Policy, Politics, and Nursing Practice, and as associate editor of Nursing Outlook. Dr. Berkowitz is an elected fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and elected member of the Institute of Medicine. She holds a Ph.D. in nursing science from Case Western Reserve University and an M.A. in nursing and a B.S. in nursing from the University of Washington. Her areas of expertise and research include public health systems and health equity. Leigh F. Callahan, Ph.D., has research interests including self-management of disease outcomes, musculoskeletal outcomes, evaluation of exercise and arthritis, and social predictors of chronic disease outcomes. Dr. Callahan has 20-plus years of experience in arthritis and health outcomes research, and experience in public health as a former arthritis epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has authored more than 170 publications and articles, is a frequent presenter at confer- ences and meetings worldwide, and continues to spearhead a number of projects examining the factors surrounding arthritis and physical activity, health outcomes, and health disparities. Dr. Callahan received her B.S. in radiologic science from the University of North Carolina and her Ph.D. in public policy from Vanderbilt University. She is an associate professor in the Departments of Medicine and Social Medicine and an adjunct as- sociate professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the director of the Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Center’s Methodology Core at the Thurston Arthritis Re- search Center, codirector of the North Carolina Family Medicine Research

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326 LIVING WELL WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS Network, and has taught Clinical Epidemiology and Aging and Health courses at UNC Chapel Hill. Ronni Chernoff, Ph.D., R.D., FADA, CSG, is the associate director of the Geriatric Research, Education & Clinical Center for Education and Evaluation for the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, director of the Arkansas Geriatric Education Center, and professor of geriatrics at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. She is past president of the American Dietetic Association, where she also served as chair, Coun- cil on Research, and chair of the Commission on Dietetic Registration. Dr. Chernoff has published numerous abstracts, journal articles, and book chapters and is editor of the text Geriatric Nutrition: The Health Profes- sional’s Handbook, third edition (2006). She has served as editor-in-chief of Perspectives in Applied Nutrition; section coeditor of Current Opinions in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care; on the editorial board of the Jour- nal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Journal of the American Dietetic Association; and associate editor of Nutrition in Clinical Practice. She also served on the editorial boards of Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation, Nutrition Support Services, Clinical Management Newsletter, Directions in Clinical Nutrition, Senior Patient (Postgraduate Medicine), and the Journal of Nutrition for the Elderly. Her primary research interests are nutrition and aging and health promotion and nutrition and wound healing. Dr. Chernoff received her B.S. from Cornell University and her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. She is also professor of health behavior and health education in the College of Public Health at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. David B. Coultas, M.D., is currently Vice President for Clinical Affairs and Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler. He completed training in internal medicine and pulmonary disease at the University of New Mexico and was a member of the University of New Mexico faculty for 16 years and Chief of the Division of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine for 6 years. Subse- quently, he was Associate Chairman of Internal Medicine at the University of Florida HSC/Jacksonville. His personal research interests include the epidemi- ology of pulmonary diseases and health outcomes research, and his projects have focused on patients with interstitial lung diseases, environmental and occupational lung diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Sherita Hill Golden, M.D., M.H.S., is an associate professor of medi- cine in the division of endocrinology and metabolism at the Johns Hop- kins University School of Medicine. She also holds joint appointments in the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research,

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327 APPENDIX D and in the department of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Univer- sity Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is the director of the Johns Hopkins Inpatient Diabetes Management Service, serves as a chairperson of the Glucose Steering Committee for the Johns Hopkins Hospital, is chairperson of the Epidemiology and Biostatistics Interest Group of the American Diabetes Association, and is vice chair of the Diabetes Commit- tee for the American Heart Association’s Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism. Dr. Golden’s primary research interest centers around identifying endocrine risk factors associated with the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Her current research focuses on studying the neuroendocrine response to chronic psychological stress as a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. She is a former Robert Wood Johnson Minority Medical Faculty Career Development Award re- cipient, and her current research is funded through the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Dr. Golden graduated Phi Beta Kappa and summa cum laude from the Univer- sity of Maryland, College Park, and alpha omega alpha from the University of Virginia School of Medicine before training in internal medicine and endocrinology and metabolism at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. During her fellowship in endocrinology, she received an M.H.S. in clinical epidemiol- ogy from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Jeffrey R. Harris, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., is a professor of health services in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington (UW). He moved to the UW in 2001 after a 20-year career at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he began as an epidemic intelligence service officer. His research focuses on healthy aging, community-based prevention of chronic diseases, and dissemination and adoption of best practices. His research methods include dissemination and implementation research, epidemiology, and evaluation. Dr. Harris serves as director and PI for the Health Promotion Research Center (HPRC), a CDC Prevention Research Center. The mission of the HPRC is to improve health by con- ducting high-quality prevention research that has an emphasis on healthy aging and can be incorporated into community practice. Teaching interests include the history, organization, and effectiveness of the U.S. health care system. Board-certified in both internal medicine and preventive medicine, Dr. Harris received his M.D. from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, his M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and his M.B.A. from UW. Russell Harris, M.D., M.P.H., is professor of medicine and adjunct profes- sor of epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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328 LIVING WELL WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS He is director of the M.D.-M.P.H. Program at UNC. He has worked with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) since 1997, including conducting systematic reviews, consulting on methods, and serving a 5-year term as a member of the USPSTF. He has led five large studies of improv- ing preventive care in community primary-care practice. He is board certi- fied in both internal medicine and preventive medicine. He is interested in preventive medicine, heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and high blood pressure. His research interests include preventive care, screening, health disparities, and cost of care. He is principal investigator and director of the UNC Research Center for Excellence in Clinical Preventive Services within the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research at UNC. He received his M.D. degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and his M.P.H. from UNC School of Public Health. He is a former Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at Case-Western Reserve University and UNC. Katie B. Horton, R.N., M.P.H., J.D., is a research professor at George Washington University’s School of Public Health and Health Services, De- partment of Health Policy. Professor Horton’s research focuses primarily on the implementation of health reform, specifically issues that relate to public health, health insurance coverage, quality of and access to care—especially for those with chronic disease. Prior to joining GW, Ms. Horton was presi- dent of Health Policy R&D, a health policy firm in Washington, DC, and spent more than a decade on Capitol Hill working for the Senate Finance Committee and Congressman Pete Stark (D-CA) where she was responsible for the member’s legislative agenda. Ms. Horton has broad experience working with congressional advisory organizations such as the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, the Government Accountability Office, and the Congressional Budget Office and has also worked extensively with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Ms. Horton also served as director of clinical services for Operation Smile, a humanitarian organiza- tion providing health services to indigent children in developing countries. M. Jeanne Miranda, Ph.D., is professor, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and assistant director of the Center for Health Ser- vices at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Miranda is a mental health services researcher who has focused her work on providing mental health care to low-income and minority communities. Dr. Miranda’s major research contributions have been in evaluating the impact of mental health care for ethnic minority communities. Her research has demonstrated the ef- fectiveness of care for depression in impoverished women, but that outreach is necessary to engage these women in care. Dr. Miranda is an investigator in three UCLA centers focusing on improving disparities in health care for ethnic minorities. She directs community cores and an innovative research

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329 APPENDIX D core focusing on translating lifestyle interventions (diet and exercise) for low-income and minority communities. She was the senior scientific editor of Mental Health: Culture, Race and Ethnicity, A Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General, published August 2001. She is currently developing and testing interventions to improve outcomes for older children adopted from foster care. Dr. Miranda received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from University of Kansas and completed post-doctoral training at University of California, San Francisco. She served on the IOM Committee on Crossing the Quality Chasm: Adaptation to Mental Health and Addictive Disorders and the IOM Committee, Review and Assessment of the NIH’s Strategic Research Plan and Budget to Reduce and Ultimately Eliminate Health Disparities. She has been a member of the Institute of Medicine since 2005. Marcia Nielsen, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the executive director of the Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative, a large coalition of provider, pur- chaser, and consumer stakeholders who have joined together to develop and advance the patient centered medical home model of health care delivery. She previously served as associate dean for Health Policy, vice chair, and associate professor within the Department of Health Policy and Manage- ment at the University of Kansas School of Medicine where her research and teaching focused on health system reform at the federal and state level, the relationship between socioeconomic disparities and health, access to primary health care and the patient centered medical home, and public health. Prior to rejoining the KU faculty, she was the first executive direc- tor (2006–2009) and board chair (2005) of Kansas’s health care agency, the Kansas Health Policy Authority (KHPA). While at KHPA, Dr. Nielsen oversaw Kansas Medicaid, the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, the State Employee Health Program, and developed a coordinated health policy agenda for the state. Prior to moving to Kansas in 2002, Dr. Nielsen spent 10 years in Washington, DC. During the debate over comprehensive health care reform in the 1990s, she worked as a legislative assistant to then U.S. Senator Bob Kerrey (D-NE). She later served as the health lob- byist and assistant director of legislation for the AFL-CIO. Dr. Nielsen has a B.S. in biology and psychology from Briar Cliff College, an M.P.H. from the George Washington University, and a Ph.D. in health policy and management from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. She served as a Peace Corps volunteer working for Ministry of Public Health in Thailand, and also served for 6 years in the U.S. Army Reserves. Olugbenga G. Ogedegbe, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., is an assistant professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine and the director of the Center for

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330 LIVING WELL WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS Healthful Behavior Change at NYU Lagone Medical Center. His research interest is focused primarily on minority health with special emphasis on the mechanisms and reduction of health disparities in hypertension-related outcomes. Specifically, he is conducting multi- and interdisciplinary behav- ioral interventions targeted at improving medication adherence and blood pressure control among hypertensive African American patients who re- ceive care in community-based primary care settings. This line of research will ultimately lead to the development and implementation of community- based behavioral interventions targeted at cardiovascular risk reduction in minority patients. Dr. Ogedegbe is the principal investigator on two NHLBI-funded R01 behavioral intervention trials. Using a multidisciplinary focus, one of such studies will investigate the effectiveness of interventions targeted at both patients and physicians in improving BP control among 1,058 hypertensive African Americans in 30 community-health centers in New York City. Co-investigators in this endeavor include clinical psy- chologists, clinical hypertension specialists, social epidemiologist, registered dieticians/nutritionist and health educators. Other behavioral intervention studies are focused on blood pressure reduction among minority elders in senior centers and faith-based organizations. To this end, Dr. Ogedegbe has formed community-based partnerships with several organizations, includ- ing the New York City Department of Health’s Office of Minority Health, several senior centers, and faith-based organizations in New York City. His long-term goal is to develop a cadre of effective practice-based behavioral approaches that are easily sustainable and can be translated into practice among low-income minority patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Patrick Remington, M.D., M.P.H., is associate dean for public health and professor of population health sciences at the School of Medicine and Pub- lic Health, University of Wisconsin–Madison. His research interests are on methods used to measure the health of communities and communicate this information to the public and policy makers. He is currently codirecting an RWJ-funded project entitled Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH). This 3-year, $5-million project ranks the health of the counties in all 50 states and examines strategies to improve population health. Dr. Remington worked for 15 years practicing public health, first at the CDC (1982–1988) and then at the Wisconsin Division of Public Health (1988– 1997). Since joining the Department of Population Health Sciences in 1997, he has directed the UW Population Health Institute and was the founding director of the Master of Public Health Program. Dr. Remington earned a B.S. in molecular biology (1976) and an M.D. (1981) from the University of Wisconsin–Madison; completed an internal medicine internship at the Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle (1982); the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) (1984) and Preventive Medicine Residency (1985) at the CDC;

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331 APPENDIX D and an M.P.H. degree (1986) from the University of Minnesota. He has au- thored or coauthored over 300 publications and teaches courses on public health practice to undergraduate, medical, and public health students. David B. Reuben, M.D., is director, Multicampus Program in Geriatrics Medicine and Gerontology, and chief, Division of Geriatrics at the Univer- sity of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Center for Health Sciences. He is the Archstone Foundation Chair and Professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and director of the UCLA Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center. Dr. Reuben sustains professional interests in clinical care, education, research, and administrative aspects of geriatrics. He has won seven awards for excellence in teaching and maintains a clinical primary care practice of frail older persons and attends on inpatient, and geriatric psychiatry units at UCLA. Dr. Reuben is a geriatrician-researcher with expertise in studies linking common geriatric syndromes (e.g., func- tional impairment, sensory impairment, malnutrition) to health outcomes such as mortality, costs, and functional decline. He also has extensive ex- perience with interventional research (e.g., comprehensive geriatric assess- ment) that has focused on health care delivery to older persons. His most recent work focuses on developing and testing interventions to improve the quality of care that primary care physicians provide for geriatric conditions. In 2000, Dr. Reuben was given the Dennis H. Jahnigen Memorial Award for outstanding contributions to education in the field of geriatrics, and in 2008, he received the Joseph T. Freeman Award by the Gerontologi- cal Society of America. Dr. Reuben was part of the team that received the 2008 John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award for Research— Joint Commission and National Quality Forum (NQF), for Assessing Care of the Vulnerable Elderly (ACOVE). He is a past-president of the American Geriatrics Society and the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs (ADGAP). Dr. Reuben is past-chair of the board of directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine. He is lead author of the widely distributed book Geriatrics at Your Fingertips. Dr. Reuben has served on four previous IOM committees and a NAS committee. Michael Schoenbaum, Ph.D., is senior advisor for mental health services, epidemiology, and economics in the Office of the Director at the National Institute of Mental Health. In that capacity, he directs a unit charged with conducting analyses of mental health burden, service use and costs, intervention opportunities, and other policy-related issues, in support of institute decision making. Dr. Schoenbaum’s research has focused par- ticularly on the costs and benefits of interventions to improve health and health care, evaluated from the perspectives of patients, providers, payers, and society. Prior to joining NIMH, Dr. Schoenbaum spent 9 years at the

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332 LIVING WELL WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS RAND Corporation, where his work included studies of the feasibility and consequences of improving care for common mental disorders, particularly depression; studies of the social epidemiology and economic consequences of chronic illness and disability; design and evaluation of decision-support tools to help consumers make health benefits choices; and international health sector development projects. Dr. Schoenbaum was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in health policy at the University of California, Berkeley, from 1995–1997. Dr. Schoenbaum received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Michigan.