Strategy 2-1: Adopt policies and implement practices to reduce over-consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Decision makers in the business community/private sector, in nongovernmental organizations, and at all levels of government should adopt comprehensive strategies to reduce over-consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.3

For schools and other locations where children and adolescents are cared for, potential actions include

  prohibiting access to sugar-sweetened beverages;

  providing a variety of beverage options that are competitively priced and are recommended by and included in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans; and

  making clean, potable water available.

For the business community/private sector, nongovernmental organizations, and governments, potential actions include

  making clean, potable water readily available in public places, worksites, and recreation areas;

  making a variety of beverage options that are competitively priced readily available in public places, worksites, and recreation areas;

  implementing fiscal policies aimed at reducing overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages through (1) pricing and other incentives to make healthier beverage options recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans more affordable and, for governments, (2) substantial and specific excise taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages (e.g., cents per ounce of liquid, cents per teaspoon of added sugar), with the revenues being dedicated to obesity prevention programs;

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3Sugar-sweetened beverages are defined to include all beverages containing added caloric sweeteners, including, but not limited to, sugar- or otherwise calorically sweetened regular sodas, less than 100 percent fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, and ready-to-drink teas and coffees.



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