Appendix A

Committee Biographies

L. Catherine Brinson, Chair, is the Jerome B. Cohen Professor of Engineering at Northwestern University, with a primary appointment in the Mechanical Engineering Department and a secondary appointment in the Materials Science and Engineering Department. After receiving her Ph.D. in applied mechanics in 1990 from the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Brinson performed postdoctoral studies in at the German Air & Space Agency. Since 1992 she has been on the faculty at Northwestern University. Her primary research focus is on the modeling and characterization of advanced material systems, including high-performance composites and intelligent materials. Her current research investigations involve studies of aging in polymeric-based systems, the nanomechanics of nano-reinforced polymers, the characterization of titanium foams for bone implants, and experiments and modeling of shape memory alloys, where investigations span the range of molecular interactions, micromechanics, and macroscale behavior. Dr. Brinson has received several awards, including the 2006 Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Prize of the Humboldt Foundation, the 2003 ASME Special Achievement Award for Young Investigators, the 1995-1999 NSF CAREER Award, and the ASEE New Mechanics Educator Award; she has served as a member of the Defense Science Study Group (1998-1999) and is currently on the National Research Council’s National Materials Advisory Board (2005-2010). She has served as a member of three NRC committees, chairing one of them. Dr. Brinson makes numerous technical presentations on her research, organizes symposia at many conferences, and has authored more than 60 journal publications. She is an active member of several professional societies and served for 5 years on the Society of Engineering Science Board of Directors, including 1 year as president of the society. She has also been an associate editor of the Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures and the Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology.

John Allison (NAE) is a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He recently retired from Ford Motor Company, where he was a senior technical leader in Research and Advanced Engineering. At Ford, he led teams focused on the science and technology required for low-cost, durable components fabricated from cast aluminum and magnesium alloys. A major focus of Dr. Allison’s work is the development of a comprehensive suite of integrated computational materials engineering tools for modeling of cast metal components, with approaches ranging from casting process simulation to first-principle atomistic calculations. His research expertise is in processing-structure-property relationships, complex failure processes such as fatigue and creep in advanced metals, and material selection processes. His past work has included development of titanium, intermetallics, and metal matrix composites for the automotive industry. Dr. Allison joined



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Appendix A Committee Biographies L. Catherine Brinson, Chair, is the Jerome B. Cohen Professor of Engineering at Northwestern University, with a primary appointment in the Mechanical Engineering Department and a secondary appointment in the Materials Science and Engineering Department. After receiving her Ph.D. in applied mechanics in 1990 from the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Brinson performed postdoctoral studies in at the German Air & Space Agency. Since 1992 she has been on the faculty at Northwestern University. Her primary research focus is on the modeling and characterization of advanced material systems, including high-performance composites and intelligent materials. Her current research investigations involve studies of aging in polymeric-based systems, the nanomechanics of nano-reinforced polymers, the characterization of titanium foams for bone implants, and experiments and model - ing of shape memory alloys, where investigations span the range of molecular interactions, micromechanics, and macroscale behavior. Dr. Brinson has received several awards, including the 2006 Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Prize of the Humboldt Foundation, the 2003 ASME Special Achievement Award for Young Investigators, the 1995- 1999 NSF CAREER Award, and the ASEE New Mechanics Educator Award; she has served as a member of the Defense Science Study Group (1998-1999) and is currently on the National Research Council’s National Materials Advisory Board (2005-2010). She has served as a member of three NRC committees, chairing one of them. Dr. Brinson makes numerous technical presentations on her research, organizes symposia at many conferences, and has authored more than 60 journal publications. She is an active member of several professional societies and served for 5 years on the Society of Engineering Science Board of Directors, including 1 year as president of the society. She has also been an associate editor of the Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures and the Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology. John Allison (NAE) is a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He recently retired from Ford Motor Company, where he was a senior technical leader in Research and Advanced Engineering. At Ford, he led teams focused on the science and technology required for low-cost, durable components fabricated from cast aluminum and magnesium alloys. A major focus of Dr. Allison’s work is the development of a comprehensive suite of integrated computational materials engineering tools for modeling of cast metal components, with approaches ranging from casting process simulation to first-principle atomistic calculations. His research expertise is in processing-structure-property relationships, complex failure processes such as fatigue and creep in advanced metals, and material selection processes. His past work has included devel - opment of titanium, intermetallics, and metal matrix composites for the automotive industry. Dr. Allison joined 139

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140 APPLICATION OF LIGHTWEIGHTING TECHNOLOGY TO MILITARY AIRCRAFT, VESSELS, AND VEHICLES Ford Research Laboratories in 1983. His work prior to that included service as an officer in the U.S. Air Force at the Wright Aeronautical Laboratories and as a visiting scientist at the Brown-Boveri Corporate Research Center in Baden, Switzerland. Dr. Allison has more than 120 publications and four patents. He was the 2002 President of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS), a global technical society for materials professionals. He is a fellow of ASM and has received numerous awards, including the Arch T. Colwell Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers, the Henry Ford Technology Award, Ford Technical Achievement awards, Ford Innova - tion awards, and the Air Force Systems Command Scientific Achievement Award. Dr. Allison was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2011. He holds a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering and materials science from Carnegie Mellon University, an M.S in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University, and a B.S. in engineering mechanics from the U.S. Air Force Academy. Julie Chen is a professor of mechanical engineering and interim vice provost for research at the University of Massachusetts–Lowell (UML). She is one of three co-directors of the UML Nanomanufacturing Center of Excel - lence and is also co-director of the Advanced Composite Materials and Textile Research Laboratory. Before coming to UML, Dr. Chen was a program director for materials processing and nanomanufacturing at the National Science Foundation. She has served on the faculty of Boston University, has been a NASA-Langley Summer Faculty Fellow, has been a visiting researcher at two French universities, and has been an invited participant on three occasions in the National Academy of Engineering’s Frontiers of Engineering Program. Dr. Chen has more than 20 years of experience in the mechanical behavior and deformation of fiber structures, fiber assemblies, and composite materials, with an emphasis on composites processing and nanomanufacturing. She serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Nanoparticle Research and the International Journal of Green Nanotechnology: Materials Sci- ence and Engineering. Dr. Chen holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. David R. Clarke (NAE) is the Gordon McKay Professor of Materials and Applied Physics in the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He holds a B.Sc. degree in applied sciences from Sussex University in the United Kingdom and a Ph.D. in physics, as well as an Sc.D. degree from the University of Cambridge. Prior to moving to Harvard, he was a professor of materials at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Previous posi - tions include senior manager, IBM Research Division; associate professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; group leader, Rockwell International Science Center; and senior scientific officer, the National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom). Dr. Clarke has published more than 450 papers and holds five patents. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Physical Society, and he received an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Senior Scientist Award. In addition, he is a Distinguished Life Member of the American Ceramic Society and was recently listed as author of one of the 11 best papers in the 110 years of publication of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society. Bradford Cowles is an aerospace materials and structures consultant to both industry and government agency clients. Mr. Cowles has extensive experience in aerospace propulsion materials, specializing in materials behavior, materials-structure interactions, and life prediction. Mr. Cowles recently retired after 37 years at Pratt & Whitney, where his final position was senior fellow–Discipline Lead for Materials & Processes Engineering. This was the most senior technical position in a 325-person comprehensive materials engineering organization specializing in gas turbine engine materials and processes, including all phases of their development, characterization, and use in prod- ucts. His responsibilities included oversight of technical projects and technology development programs, resolution of technical and product issues, and strategic planning for future technology and discipline development efforts. Mr. Cowles has extensive experience in titanium and nickel-based superalloys, including directionally solidified and single-crystal materials, as well as in advanced materials such as structural intermetallics. He has extensive expertise in the mechanics of materials, life prediction and damage tolerance methods, and experimental methods related to testing of materials and engine components. Recent focus areas include advanced surface treatments such as laser shock processing as well as materials and structures prognosis technology for gas turbine engines. In 2010, Mr. Cowles focused on developing materials-related strategic plans for a major aerospace company, con -

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141 APPENDIX A sulting for aerospace companies on critical field issues involving materials and structures assessments, developing an actionable plan for integrated computational materials engineering (ICME), and using probabilistic methods for propulsion system validation for the U.S. Air Force. Mr. Cowles holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering science from Florida State University and an M.S. degree in management from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. George T. Gray III is a laboratory fellow and staff member in the dynamic properties and constitutive modeling team within the Materials Science Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). He came to LANL fol - lowing a 3-year visiting scholar position at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg (Germany) after having received his Ph.D. in materials science in 1981 from Carnegie Mellon University. As a staff member (1985-1987) and later team leader (1987-2003) in the LANL Dynamic Materials Properties and Constitutive Modeling Section within the Structure / Property Relations Group, he has directed a research team working on investigations of the dynamic response of materials. He conducts fundamental, applied, and focused programmatic research on materi - als and structures, in particular in response to high strain rate and shock deformation. His research is focused on experimental and modeling studies of substructure evolution and mechanical response of materials. These consti - tutive and damage models are used in engineering computer codes to support large-scale finite element modeling simulations of structures for applications ranging from national defense (DOE, DoD, DARPA), to industry (GM, Ford, Chrysler, and Bettis), to foreign object damage, to manufacturing. Dr. Gray is a Life Member of Clare Hall, Cambridge University, where he was on sabbatical in the summer of 1998. He is currently the president of the Min - erals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS); is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of ASM International; and serves on the International Scientific Advisory Board of the European DYMAT Association. He also serves on the board of governors for Acta Materialia. Dr. Gray is a member of the NRC National Materials Advisory Board. Eric Greene is a naval architect and marine engineer who focuses on marine composites. He has lectured nation - ally and internationally on the topic and is the author of the highly acclaimed book Marine Composites. In 1988, he founded Eric Greene Associates, Inc., with the goal of advancing the understanding of composite materials for marine structures. The company focuses on large composite structures for naval, commercial, and recreational applications, allowing for technology transfer among diverse industries. Its research and development also covers non-destructive evaluation (NDE), repair, and wave impact. The company’s recent projects include technology transfer assistance for a major Norwegian shipbuilder supporting the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR); cost modeling of a next-generation Navy hovercraft for the ONR ManTech program; development of a “stowable” megayacht helicopter landing platform; calculation of riser loads for a floating transit offloading and storage plat - form; revision of NAVSEA Technical Publication T9074-AX-GIB-010/100, “Material Selection Requirements,” to include updated guidelines for composites; and development of the Technology Road Map for Shipboard Naval Composites for the ONR ManTech program. Mr. Green holds a B.S. in naval architecture and marine engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Wesley L. Harris (NAE) is the Charles Stark Draper Professor and head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on theoretical and experimental unsteady aerodynamics and aeroacoustics, computational fluid dynamics, and the government policy impact on procurement of high-technology systems. Prior to this position he served as the associate administrator for aeronautics at NASA. He has also served as the vice president and chief administrative officer of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. Dr. Harris has served on committees of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Helicopter Society (AHS), and the National Technical Association (NTA) and has been an advisor to eight colleges, universities, and institutes. He was elected a fellow of the AIAA and of the AHS for personal engineering achievements, engineering education, management, and advancing cultural diversity. Dr. Harris has served as chair and member of various boards and committees of the National Research Council (NRC), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Army Science Board, and several state governments. He holds a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University.

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142 APPLICATION OF LIGHTWEIGHTING TECHNOLOGY TO MILITARY AIRCRAFT, VESSELS, AND VEHICLES Manish Mehta has been director of collaboration programs at the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) since 2001. He is also executive director of Technologies Research Corporation, a subsidiary of NCMS, established to provide professional technology management services for new technologies and alliances. His responsibilities include assessing emerging manufacturing-related technology needs in the national interest and developing collaborative research and development projects with NCMS’s defense, industrial, and academic members. These collaborations include projects in fuel cell component manufacturing, lightweight materials, and nanomanufacturing technologies. He previously served as director of the Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites Consortium (a supplier group hosted by NCMS) and was the convener of the Steel Joint Industry Alliance of steel-making, forging, heat-treating, powder metal, and end-user industries and trade organizations, formed to promote greater cross-industry leveraging in research. He also served as Peer Review Agency director of the 2008 Michigan 21st Century Jobs Fund Business Plan Competition. Dr. Mehta is a former member of the NRC’s Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. Gregory B. Olson (NAE) is the Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwest - ern University, where he directs the Materials Technology Laboratory/Steel Research Group at the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2010 for his contribution to research, development, implementation, and teaching of science-based materials by design. Dr. Olson is considered one of the founders of computational materials design. He developed a systematic science- based approach for designing alloys that takes the desired properties and calculates the optimum composition and processing route. In 1997, he founded QuesTek Innovations LLC, a materials design company. Dr. Olson is a fellow of ASM and of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS). He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in materials science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and remained there in a series of senior research positions before joining the faculty of Northwestern University in 1988. Beyond materials design, his research interests include phase transformations, structure/property relationships, and applications of high-resolution microanalysis. Recent awards include the ASM Campbell Memorial Lectureship, the TMS-SMD Distinguished Scientist/Engineer Award, and the Cambridge University Kelly Lectureship. Charles Saff is chief engineer for structural certification and qualification for Boeing Research and Technology. In addition to his Boeing responsibilities, Mr. Saff leads a multi-national working group for NATO-RTO on the development of guidelines for structural design and qualification of unmanned military aircraft. He also serves on the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He has led multicompany programs in technology development and transition for DARPA/USAF (X-45A and Composites Affordability Initiative), DARPA/Navy (Accelerated Insertion of Materials program), and NASA (High Speed Research program). He has performed full-scale test reviews for the Boeing 787, structural integration for the X-45A Prototype UCAV, and structural qualification for the YF-23 aircraft. Mr. Saff has performed more than 50 research and development projects in strength and fatigue of metallic, composite, metal matrix composite, and hybrid materials and structures over his career at McDonnell Douglas and Boeing. He served on the NRC Committee on Aging of Air Force Aircraft in 1996-1997 and has also served on several review committees for U.S. Air Force and NASA internal research and development. Mr. Saff has been active for many years in both the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), serving as committee member, committee chair, and inter- national conference chair for ASTM. For AIAA, Mr. Saff has served nationally as deputy director, director, and vice president of technical activities. He is currently a member of the Ethics Committee for the board of directors of AIAA. Mr. Saff is an AIAA fellow and a Boeing technical fellow. Darrell R. Tenney is retired from the NASA Langley Research Center, where he was chief of the Materials Divi - sion and former director of the Airframe Systems Program. Dr. Tenney has extensive experience and expertise in researching and developing advanced composites and metallic materials; in applying advanced composites to aerospace structures for both aircraft and spacecraft; in determining the environmental effects on materials in both aircraft and space applications; in conducting technology assessments; in identifying critical barriers and devel - oping solutions to them; in identifying key challenges for developing new R&D efforts; and in formulating and

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143 APPENDIX A advocating for new programs. He has conducted numerous technology assessments, including assessments of the R&D programs under European Frameworks V and VI and assessments of European efforts to build composite primary structures for the Airbus family of aircraft. He was the lead on the study “Evaluation of Advanced Com - posite Structure Technologies for Application to NASA’s Vision for Space Exploration,” conducted by AS&M, Inc., for NASA Langley. Francis W. Zok is a professor and associate chair of the Materials Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research over the past 20 years has addressed the thermal and mechanical properties of multiphase materials and structures. His recent activities have focused on three specific areas. The first involves protection systems for military ground vehicles, principally against improvised explosive devices. The second focuses on personnel protection systems. The third is on high-temperature ceramic composites for use in future propulsion systems in military and civilian aircraft as well as hypersonic flight vehicles. Dr. Zok has been an associate editor of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society since 1993. He has served on the editorial board for Current Opinion in Solid State and Materials Science; the Scientific Advisory Board for the AFRL Materials and Manufacturing Directorate; the National Academies Technical Assessment Board for the ARL Panels on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology and on Armor and Armaments; the National Science Foundation Panel on Nanomechanics; and the Expert Review Committee on Materials Science, Canada Foundation for Innovation. He is currently chair of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Canadian Magnesium Network. Dr. Zok is the author of five book chapters and more than 150 scientific publications.