C

Planning Committee Biographies

Scott A. Mugno, J.D. (Co-chair) is the Vice President, Safety and Vehicle Maintenance at FedEx Ground. Mr. Mugno and his department of 200 employees focus to create a safe work environment for all employees, contractors, and the public, eliminating accidents and injuries while maintaining regulatory compliance. They are responsible for ensuring all equipment meets Department of Transportation requirements and is operational to service the transportation needs of the company. They manage fuel inventory reconciliation, retail pricing, and administration of a fleet retail fuel card. Mr. Mugno has been in the environmental, health, safety, or transportation arenas for more than 20 years. He joined FedEx Express as a senior attorney in the Legal and Regulatory Affairs Department. He was promoted to the position of Managing Director, Safety, Health and Fire Prevention, where he worked in Memphis before accepting his current position at FedEx Ground in Pittsburgh. Prior to FedEx, Mr. Mugno was division counsel at Westinghouse Electric Corporation’s Waste Isolation Division and deputy staff judge advocate for the Eastern Region U.S. Army Military Traffic Management command. He has held other legal positions in the Army JAG Corps and in private-practice law firms. Mr. Mugno regularly represents FedEx at various trade and safety association and committee meetings and is a frequent speaker before those and other groups.

William F. Raub, Ph.D. (Co-chair), retired in January 2009 after more than 42 years in the employ of the Federal Government, primarily the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Current activities include advising the U.S. Postal Service on public health emergency pre-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 93
C Planning Committee Biographies Scott A. Mugno, J.D. (Co-chair) is the Vice President, Safety and Vehi- cle Maintenance at FedEx Ground. Mr. Mugno and his department of 200 employees focus to create a safe work environment for all employ- ees, contractors, and the public, eliminating accidents and injuries while maintaining regulatory compliance. They are responsible for ensuring all equipment meets Department of Transportation requirements and is op- erational to service the transportation needs of the company. They man- age fuel inventory reconciliation, retail pricing, and administration of a fleet retail fuel card. Mr. Mugno has been in the environmental, health, safety, or transportation arenas for more than 20 years. He joined FedEx Express as a senior attorney in the Legal and Regulatory Affairs Depart- ment. He was promoted to the position of Managing Director, Safety, Health and Fire Prevention, where he worked in Memphis before accept- ing his current position at FedEx Ground in Pittsburgh. Prior to FedEx, Mr. Mugno was division counsel at Westinghouse Electric Corporation’s Waste Isolation Division and deputy staff judge advocate for the Eastern Region U.S. Army Military Traffic Management command. He has held other legal positions in the Army JAG Corps and in private-practice law firms. Mr. Mugno regularly represents FedEx at various trade and safety association and committee meetings and is a frequent speaker before those and other groups. William F. Raub, Ph.D. (Co-chair), retired in January 2009 after more than 42 years in the employ of the Federal Government, primarily the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Current activities include advising the U.S. Postal Service on public health emergency pre- 93

OCR for page 93
94 BIOSURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SHARING AND COLLABORATION paredness, advising HHS on vaccine safety infrastructure, serving as Ad- junct Staff for the RAND Corporation, serving on the Science Advisory Board of George Mason University, and performing volunteer work for St. John’s Church, Chevy Chase, Maryland. Dr. Raub held a wide variety of positions within the federal government, including Science Advisor to the Secretary, HHS (1995-2009); Science Advisor to the Administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (1992-1995); Special Assistant within the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President of the United States (1991-1992); Act- ing Director, National Institutes of Health (NIH) (1989-1991); and Depu- ty Director, NIH (1986-1991). Dr. Raub received numerous awards, including the Presidential Distinguished Executive Rank Award, the Presidential Meritorious Executive Rank Award, the HHS Distinguished Service Award, the American Medical Association’s Nathan Davis Award, and the Society of Research Administrators’ Award for Distin- guished Contribution to Research Administration. James W. Buehler, M.D., is the director of the Public Health Surveil- lance Program Office (PHSPO) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 1981 to 2002, Dr. Buehler served as a medical epidemiologist in the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) at CDC, where he worked in general field epidemiology, maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS prevention, and, for a short period in 2001, anthrax. His work in public health surveillance has spanned analysis, methods development, surveillance system design and management, assurance of ethical prac- tice, and linkage of surveillance and other scientific evidence to program management, policy development, and community-based prevention planning. In 2002, he joined the faculty of the Epidemiology Department at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, where he focused on the role of epidemiology in public health preparedness and response programs and on the emerging field of public health systems research. In 2009, he returned to CDC to contribute to surveillance of pandemic H1N1 influenza. Since 2010, he has served as the Director of PHSPO, which is responsible for managing several national surveillance systems, including the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, BioSense, and the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, and for providing a focal point at CDC for advancing surveillance science and practice in support of public health programs.

OCR for page 93
95 APPENDIX C Joseph Kielman, Ph.D., serves as Science Advisor in the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), where he is the Chief Scientist for the Infrastructure Protection and Disaster Management Division (IDD) and also Chief of its Visuali- zation Analytics Technologies Branch. He also manages two Centers of Excellence for the S&T Office of University Programs. Dr. Kielman es- tablished and directs the National Visualization and Analytics Center; manages the Precision Information Environments program; and oversees joint programs with the National Science Foundation (FODAVA), De- fence Research and Development Canada, and the German BMBF. Im- mediately prior to joining DHS, Dr. Kielman worked for 20 years at the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), where he was successively Chief of the Advanced Technology Group in the Engineering Section, Chief of Research and Development for the Technical Services Division, and Chief Scientist and also Chief Architect at the Information Resources Division. His work at the FBI included development of advanced infor- mation collection and surveillance systems, microelectronic and micro- mechanical design capabilities, advanced computer architectures, and information processing and analysis technologies. Dr. Kielman has an undergraduate degree in physics and graduate degrees in biophysics and did postdoctoral work in genetics. In 2006 he was awarded the Presiden- tial Rank of Meritorious Senior Professional. Richard C. Larson, Ph.D., is the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Mitsui Professor in the Engineering Systems Division. He is founding director of the Center for Engineering System Fundamentals. He has focused on operations research as applied to services industries, primarily in the fields of criminal justice, technology-enabled education, urban service systems, queueing, logistics, workforce planning, and planning for and response to disasters. He is Past-President of INFORMS, INstitute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, an INFORMS Founding Fellow, and a recipient of the INFORMS Presi- dent’s Award, Lanchester Prize and Kimball Medal. From 1995 to mid- 2003, Dr. Larson served as Director of MIT’s CAES, Center for Advanced Educational Services. He was founder, with Glenn Strehle, of MIT World (http://mitworld.mit.edu). He is founding Director of LINC (http://linc.mit.edu), Learning International Networks Consortium, an MIT-based international project that has held five international symposia and sponsored a number of initiatives in Africa, China and the Middle

OCR for page 93
96 BIOSURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SHARING AND COLLABORATION East. With Elizabeth Murray, he recently started LINC’s newest and largest initiative, BLOSSOMS, Blended Learning Open Source Science or Math Studies (http://blossoms.mit.edu). Mark E. Teachman, D.V.M., is Director for Interagency Coordination in the National Center for Animal Health Emergency Management, which resides in the Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Veterinary Services (VS). He leads a team of subject-matter expert liaisons that are either imbedded in another federal agency or liaise with other agencies as needed. These subject-matter experts are focused on identifying assets (people, teams, information, or other tools) that can be used to support a response to an animal health emergency. They also provide the agencies they liaise with appropriate information about National Center for Animal Health Emer- gency Management (NCAHEM) activities and animal health emergency response requirements. Dr. Teachman graduated from Michigan State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, in 1984. From 1984 until joining the federal government, Dr. Teachman was in private practice and involved in a family computer business. In 1988, he joined the USDA, APHIS, VS, and was assigned to APHIS, VS Headquarters on the Import-Export Staff working animal import issues. He worked on trade related issues on the Import-Export Staff for three years before transferring to the Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health (CEAH) in Fort Collins, Colorado. At CEAH, Dr. Teachman focused on infor- mation management, epidemiology, and animal production food safety for 3 years. In 1997, he returned to APHIS, to work for the VS, Emer- gency Management & Diagnostics (EM&D) Staff in Riverdale, Mary- land. Dr. Teachman focused on long-range strategic planning, liaison, or outreach activities to explain APHIS response actions or recruit re- sources to help in a global response, and defining information manage- ment strategies for animal health emergency management community. As a Staff Officer on EM&D, he developed, implemented, and partici- pated in many international and national exercises to evaluate and im- prove the nation’s ability to respond to animal health emergencies. Some of the groups he exercised with over the years include the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), Department of Defense (DOD), various states, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and Mexico. He also promoted the use of modeling tools such as APHIS, VS’s North American Animal Disease Spread Model to support animal health emergency management-response planning, and was inti-

OCR for page 93
97 APPENDIX C mately involved in an interagency working group to develop a long term vision for research and development of animal disease spread models. Michael M. Wagner, M.D., Ph.D. (P.I.), is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Informatics (primary appointment) and of Intelligent Sys- tems (secondary) at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Wagner is the Di- rector of the Real-Time Outbreak and Disease Surveillance (RODS) Laboratory of the Department of Biomedical Informatics of the Universi- ty of Pittsburgh. He obtained a B.S. in biology from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook in 1975, an M.D. from the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine in 1979, and a Ph.D. in arti- ficial intelligence from the University of Pittsburgh in 1995. Dr. Wag- ner’s primary research interest is informatics in public health. Since 1999, he has been developing information technology to detect out- breaks. He has served as principal investigator on several large grants involving the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) to develop and deploy advanced methods of biosurveillance. He was chief editor and a principle contributor to Handbook of Biosurveillance. At present, Dr. Wagner is principal investigator on a grant entitled “Decision Making in Biosurveillance,” and of the Universi- ty of Pittsburgh’s Center of Excellence in Public Health Informatics, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Wagner has served on two Defense Science Boards (2001, 2002) in the areas of intelligence for biological warfare and on defense against bio- logical attacks. The Defense Science Boards advise the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Secretary of Defense about science priorities for the De- partment of Defense (DOD). After the Anthrax attacks of October 2001, Dr. Wagner testified before the House Committee on Energy and Com- merce, Subcommittee on Hearing of the Oversight and Investigations (November 1, 2001), and, with Dr. Andrew Moore, briefed President Bush, Secretary Thompson, and Governor Ridge on the RODS research (February 5, 2002).

OCR for page 93