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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF C BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION: PLANNING COMMITTEE, SPEAKERS AND STAFF PER PINSTRUP-ANDERSEN (Committee Chair and STS Roundtable Member) is the H.E. Babcock Professor of Food, Nutrition and Public Policy, the J. Thomas Clark Professor of Entrepreneurship, and Professor of Applied Economics at Cornell University and Professor of Agricultural Economics at Copenhagen University. He is past Chairman of the Science Council of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) and Past President of the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). He has a B.S. from the Danish Agricultural University, a M.S. and Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University and honorary doctoral degrees from universities in the United States, United Kingdom, Netherlands, Switzerland and India. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the American Agricultural Economics Association. He served 10 years as the International Food Policy Research Institute’s Director General and seven years as department head; seven years as an economist at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, Colombia; and six years as a distinguished professor at Wageningen University. He is the 2001 World Food Prize Laureate and the recipient of several awards for his teaching, research and communication of research results. His research and teaching include economic analyses of food and nutrition policy, globalization and poverty, agricultural development, the interaction between the food system and human health and nutrition, and agricultural research and technology policy. TIM BENTON is Research Dean in the Faculty of Biological Sciences at the University of Leeds, and Professor of Population Ecology. He has previously been on the staff at the Universities of Stirling and Aberdeen (UEA), undertook postdoctoral work at UEA and has a PhD from Cambridge and undergraduate degree from Oxford. His research interests are broad and concern managing populations under environmental change; with much of the specific work concerning the theory of population dynamics and the practice of managing biodiversity in agricultural settings. The population dynamical work includes development of theory informed by empirical understanding derived from a laboratory model organism, a soil mite. Within the role of research dean, he has been exposed to a wide range of biomedical and molecular sciences and has developed a strong interest in “systems approaches”. He has worked on many different questions: from identifying the appropriate scale of management, to patterns of biodiversity in the fossil record, but all have at their core understanding how the environment affects behavior and life history, and how the responses are summed across individuals to produce population dynamics. MIKE BUSHELL (Committee Member) is head of Jealott’s Hill International Research Centre in the United Kingdom. Dr. Bushell has recently taken up a new role in global R&D as principal scientific adviser and is also secretary to Syngenta’s Science and Technology Advisory Board. Dr. Bushell graduated with a B.Sc. in organic chemistry from Liverpool and a Ph.D. 90

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF from Liverpool/University of California at Davis. Dr. Bushell came to Jealott’s Hill in 1980 as a team leader in insecticide research, following postdoctoral work in Cambridge. Since 1990, Dr. Bushell has held various management positions in chemistry and bioscience and has also worked within Zeneca Specialties in Manchester. He returned to Jealott’s Hill in 1999 as sector leader for insect and fungal control. Within Syngenta he has previously been head of R&T projects, head of discovery, head of strategy and technology, and head of external partnerships. DEREK BYERLEE is the chair of the Standing Panel on Impact Assessment of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) and a consultant and adviser to a number of international organizations. Formerly he was rural strategy adviser for the World Bank and co-director of the 2008 World Development Report: Agriculture for Development. Before joining the Bank, he was director of economics at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) and associate professor at Michigan State University. For most of his career he worked in several postings in Africa, Latin America and Asia conducting field research on agricultural technological change and food policy. He has published widely in several fields of agricultural development. JUDE CAPPER is an Assistant Professor of Dairy Sciences in the Department of Animal Sciences at Washington State University. She undertook her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Harper Adams University College (UK) where her post-graduate research focused on the relationship between ruminant nutrition and neonatal behavior. Following a two-year lectureship in Animal Biology at the University of Worcester (UK), her post-doctoral research at Cornell focused on two areas: ruminant lipid metabolism, and modeling the environmental impact of dairy production. At Cornell, Jude worked with Prof. Dale Bauman to develop a deterministic model of the environmental impact of dairy production, based on the NRC (2001) nutrient requirements for dairy cows. At WSU, her program focuses on quantifying the environmental impact of dairy and beef production systems, identifying the factors that contribute to mitigating resource use and greenhouse gas emissions and communicating the results to producers, consumer and policy-makers. Current projects include comparisons of the historical and modern US beef industry; evaluation of the effect of dairy breed on the environmental impact of cheese production; and quantifying the impact of performance-enhancing technologies on resource use and greenhouse gas emissions from beef production. JASON CLAY (Committee Member) is Senior Vice-President of Market Transformation in the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). Over the course of his career Jason Clay has worked on a family farm, taught at Harvard and Yale, worked in the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and spent more than twenty-five years working with human rights and environmental organizations. In 1988, Clay invented Rainforest Marketing, one of the first fair-trade ecolabels in the United States, and helped create Rainforest Crunch. From 1999-2003, Clay co-directed a consortium with WWF, World Bank, UN Food and Agriculture Organization, and National Aquaculture Centres of Asia/Pacific to identify better management practices for shrimp. He has convened multi-stakeholder roundtables to reduce the impacts of producing salmon, soy, sugarcane, cotton and palm oil. Clay leads WWF’s efforts to work with private sector companies to improve their supply chain management, particularly ingredient sourcing and carbon and water neutrality. Clay is the author of 15 books (most recently, World Aquaculture and the Environment (in press), Exploring the Links between International Business and Poverty Reduction: A Case Study of 91

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF Unilever in Indonesia (2005) and World Agriculture and the Environment (2004) and more than 250 articles and 500 invited presentations. Clay studied at Harvard and the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1979 in anthropology and international agriculture. DONALD CRANE is Senior Development Officer and Washington Area Representative for the International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC). He provides liaison with USAID and other donor agencies and partners and helps develop and manage IFDC agribusiness projects in Africa, Eastern Europe, and Asia. Mr. Crane has over 30 years of experience promoting economic growth and organizational management for development assistance. Prior to joining IFDC, Mr. Crane from 1979 to 2004 was a key leader in the growth of ACDI/VOCA where he assisted the president in perfecting the merger of Agricultural Cooperative Development International and Volunteers in Overseas Cooperative Assistance to form ACDI/VOCA. From 1997 to 2004, he served as Executive Vice President/Senior Advisor to the President and as president of ACDI/VOCA supporting organizations: Agricultural Services International, Planning Assistance, and VOCA Foundation. Mr. Crane also served as Project Officer for Africa, Near East, Asia, and the Pacific. He has served as Chairman of the Board of the Overseas Cooperative Development Council (OCDC); as Secretary of the Board of Volunteers in Economic Growth Alliance (VEGA); and, as Member of the Board of the Society for International Development (SID). Mr. Crane has an M.S. in food and resource economics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, and a B.S., accounting, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. HARTWIG DE HAEN is retired Professor, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, University of Göttingen. From 1990 to 2005 he was Assistant Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome. From 1990 to 1994 he was head of FAO’s Agriculture Department and from 1995 until his retirement head of the Economic and Social Department. He has studied at the Universities of Kiel and Göttingen and at Michigan State University/USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics. During his time in academic institutions he was a member of research and policy advisory bodies, including the Council of Scientific Advisors to the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (Chair from 1988-1990). He has published books and articles in the fields of production economics, development economics, agricultural policy and environmental economics. BERT DRAKE (Committee Member) is a former plant physiologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Maryland and the leader of two major ecosystem projects on the impacts of rising atmospheric CO2 and climate change. The Chesapeake Bay wetland study is now in the 23rd year making it the longest running experiment of its type ever undertaken. In collaboration with NASA, the CO2 study was expanded in 1996 to include similar studies of a nutrient and water limited dwarf oak forest on Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. These studies have resulted in more than 100 publications and involved collaborators, post doctoral fellows and graduate students from many foreign countries and the US. A popular lecturer, he has been invited to speak on the impact of global warming on terrestrial ecosystems to a wide range of educational and professional organizations. In 2005, he was designated the Distinguished Research Lecturer by the Smithsonian Institution for his long record of research and public outreach. 92

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF MARCO FERRONI (STS Roundtable Member) is the Executive Director of the Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture. Before joining the Foundation, Dr. Ferroni, an expert in international agriculture and sustainability issues, worked at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the World Bank in Washington, DC. As a Deputy Manager of the Sustainable Development Department of the IDB, he had responsibility for regional sector policy and technical support to the Bank’s country departments. As the Principal Officer in the Bank’s Office of Evaluation and Oversight, he directed evaluation studies that assessed the relevance, performance and results of Bank strategies and investments. As a senior advisor at the World Bank he advised on donor relations and directed work on international public goods and their role in foreign aid and international affairs. Earlier in his career, he was an economist and division chief in the government of Switzerland, working in development cooperation. Marco Ferroni holds a doctoral degree in agricultural economics from Cornell University. JAMES GORNEY currently serves as a Senior Advisor for Produce Safety at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition in the Office of Food Safety. Dr. Gorny’s primary responsibility is to advise the Director of the Office Food Safety on policies and programs affecting the safety of fresh produce. Prior to joining the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Gorny served as the executive director of the Postharvest Technology Research and Information Center at the University of California, Davis. From 2000 to 2007 Dr. Gorny served as Senior Vice President of Food Safety & Technology for the United Fresh Produce Association / International Fresh-cut Produce Association which merged in 2006. Dr. Gorny received his Ph.D. in plant biology from the University of California at Davis in 1995, and his B.S. and M.S. degrees in food science from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He is the author and editor of numerous scientific and technical publications pertaining to the quality and safety of fresh produce. He is also the 2005 recipient of the International Fresh-cut Produce Association Technical Award. Actively involved in the fresh produce industry since 1986, Dr. Gorny has worked extensively on perishables quality and food safety issues including development and implementation of Good Agricultural Practices, modified atmosphere packaging design, quality assurance, operations, and general management issues, both nationally and internationally. BRIAN GREENBERG is the Director of Sustainable Development at InterAction, an alliance of US NGOs engaged in international development and humanitarian assistance. His experience in rural development extends from sustainable agriculture and natural resource management to capacity building for NGOs and communities. The interface between climate change and agriculture has been an area of increasing focus for Dr. Greenberg over the past 10 years. His field experience includes work in Egypt, India, Jamaica, Nepal, Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Dr. Greenberg has experience in field survey methods, participatory rural appraisal, agricultural development, monitoring and evaluation, conflict assessment and mitigation, gender issues, natural resource management, strategic planning and organizational capacity assessment and strengthening. Dr. Greenberg has a B.S. in Biochemistry from Dickinson College, a M.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Brown University, and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. His prior professional experience includes academic research and teaching, a Science Policy Fellowship at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and independent consulting. 93

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF ADEL KADER is a Professor of Postharvest Physiology in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of California at Davis. His research deals with postharvest biology and technology in relation to preserving flavor and nutritional quality of intact and fresh-cut fruits. He has published more than 200 technical publications and edited and co-authored a book on Postharvest Technology. Dr. Kader received awards for outstanding teaching in 1989 and for distinguished graduate mentoring in 2003 from UC Davis. He was elected a Fellow in 1986 and President in 1996 of the American Society for Horticultural Science. Dr. Kader received the Award of Distinction in 2000 from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis. In April, 2010 he received an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Cartagena in Spain. EMI KAMEYAMA (Staff) is a Program Associate for the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS) at the National Academies. She has been involved in several STS activities including the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, workshops on global food security, and a consensus study assessing sustainability linkages in the federal government. Emi received her M.A. in International Affairs with a focus on Environment and Development from The George Washington University and a B.S. in Government from Suffolk University. MELINDA KIMBLE is a senior vice president of the United Nations Foundation, overseeing the Foundation’s International Bioenergy Initiative. She joined the UN Foundation in May 2000. Prior to the Foundation, Ms. Kimble served as a state department foreign service officer, attaining the rank of minister-counselor. She served in policy-level positions in the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs, overseeing multilateral development issues and debt policy; in the Bureau of Oceans, International Environment and Scientific Affairs (OES), leading environmental negotiations (e.g., Climate Change Conference, Kyoto, Japan, 1997). Her assignments abroad include Cote d’Ivoire, Egypt and Tunisia. She speaks French and Arabic and holds two master’s degrees: Economics (University of Denver) and MPA (Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government). PATRICIA KOSHEL (Staff) is a senior program officer with the National Academies Policy and Global Affairs Division. She has been the staff lead for a number of workshops and studies including one examining federal R&D activities related to urban sustainability, a regional workshop assessing the sustainability impacts of biofuels, and work on global food security. Before joining the National Academies, Ms. Koshel was the director of bilateral programs in the Office of International Affairs of the US Environmental Protection Agency. She has a master’s degree in economics. CAROL KRAMER-LEBLANC serves as Director of Sustainable Development at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She is an agricultural economist with broad experience in the federal government, in academia, and with international organizations. Dr. Kramer-LeBlanc has worked for several years as an associate director at USDA’s Economic Research Service in the natural resources area as well as served as Deputy Executive Director of the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion and Director of the Foreign Agricultural Service’ Research and Scientific Exchange Division. 94

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF DAVID LOBELL is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in Environmental Earth System Science, and a Center Fellow in Stanford’s Program on Food Security and the Environment. His research focuses on identifying opportunities to raise crop yields in major agricultural regions, with a particular emphasis on adaptation to climate change. Prior to his current appointment, Dr. Lobell was a Senior Research Scholar at FSE from 2008-2009 and a Lawrence Post-doctoral Fellow at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 2005-2007. He received a PhD in Geological and Environmental Sciences from Stanford University in 2005, and a Sc.B. in Applied Mathematics, Magna Cum Laude from Brown University in 2000. NANCY MCCARTHY is currently the President and Principle Analyst of LEAD Analytics, which focuses on providing research and consulting services in the area of law, economics and agriculture for development. Dr. McCarthy’s major areas of expertise include: economic and institutional analyses of policies to manage climate change mitigation and adaptation in small- holder farming systems; risk management and coping mechanisms; sustainable land management; property rights and land tenure; and, economic and legal analyses of multilateral environmental agreements and intellectual property rights in the context of technology transfer. McCarthy has extensive field experience in fifteen sub-Saharan African countries, Mexico and Chile. Dr. McCarthy holds a PhD in Agriculture and Resource Economics from the University of California at Berkeley, and a JD Cum Laude from the George Mason University School of Law. JEFFREY MILDER is an ecologist and land-use planner with fourteen years of experience in the field of conservation and sustainable development. He has worked with EcoAgriculture Partners since 2005, first as a Research Fellow associated with the Landscape Measures Initiative and payment for ecosystem services projects, and currently as Director of Strategic Planning and Research. Dr. Milder holds MSc and PhD degrees in Natural Resources from Cornell University and a BA in Earth Sciences from Harvard University. Most recently, he has conducted research on landscape-scale relations between agricultural management and biodiversity conservation in pasture-dominated landscapes of Central America. Prior to joining EcoAgriculture Partners, he founded and managed the community planning practice at Daylor Consulting Group, a design firm based in Massachusetts. UZO MOKWUNYE currently serves as a Development Strategy Consultant. Dr. Mokwunye was a Professor and Head of the Department of Soil Science at the Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. From 1996-2004, Dr. Mokwunye served as the Director of the United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa. He also served for 16 years as a staff member at the International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC) and during this time, served for 7 years as the Director of IFDC-Africa. He also served as the Chair of the Governing Board of ICRISAT and the Chair of the CGIAR Committee of Center Board Chairs. He received his Bachelor of Science and Masters of Science at Ohio State University and his doctoral degree at the University of Illinois. DAVID MOLDEN is Deputy Director General for Research at the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) with over 25 years in the field of water management. His passion for water grew from his experience helping villagers organize a drinking water well in Lesotho. He has a PhD from Colorado State University with specialties in groundwater hydrology and 95

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF irrigation, and has since developed broader interests in integrating social, technical and environmental aspects of water management with work across Asia and Africa. Now in Sri Lanka with IWMI, he enjoys interdisciplinary and cross-cultural teamwork with IWMI and partners to solve local water problems. Recently David coordinated a global program involving over 700 participants to produce a Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture, with results documented in the publication Water for Food, Water for Life. The assessment examines trends, conditions, challenges and responses in water management for agriculture to enable effective investments and management decisions for enhancing food and environmental security. David received the 2009 award for CGIAR Outstanding Scientist. MARINA S. MOSES (Staff) serves as the Director for the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS) in the Division of Policy and Global Affairs of the National Academies. In this capacity, she also serves as the Director of the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability. Under her leadership, the STS program issued the consensus report, Sustainability and the USEPA, and has recently undertaken the multi-sponsored study, Sustainability Linkages in the Federal Government. Prior to joining the Academies, Dr. Moses served on the faculty of the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, where she also directed the Doctoral Program and was the practicum coordinator for the graduate program. Dr. Moses was the recipient of the 2005 Pfizer Scholar in Public Health Award and has worked in emergency preparedness and communication with communities on public health issues. Previously, Dr. Moses held senior scientific positions in the Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, where she worked on the development of a qualitative framework to assess hazardous and nuclear waste risks, and served as the senior health risk assessor in the New York City office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund Program. Dr. Moses received her Bachelor of Arts (Chemistry) and her Master of Science (Environmental Health Sciences) degrees from Case Western Reserve University. She received her Doctorate of Public Health (Environmental Health Sciences) from Columbia University School of Public Health. JERRY NELSON is a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). He is an agricultural economist with over 30 years of professional and research experience in the areas of agriculture, policy analysis, land use and climate change. As co-leader of IFPRI’s global change program, he is responsible for developing IFPRI’s research in climate change modeling and spatially explicit assessments of potential adaptation and mitigation programs and policies. His previous professional activities includes leading the drivers of ecosystem services efforts of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, undertaking research that combines biophysical and socioeconomic data in quantitative, spatially-explicit modeling of the determinants of land use change, and understanding the effects of agricultural, trade and macroeconomic policies on agriculture and land use. Before joining IFPRI, Dr. Nelson was a professor in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (1985-2008) and an Agricultural Development Council specialist at the University of the Philippines, Los Baños. He received his PhD from Stanford University in 1982. PHILIP PARDEY (Committee Member) is Professor of Science and Technology Policy in the Department of Applied Economics and Director of the International Science and Technology 96

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF Practice and Policy (InSTePP) center at the University of Minnesota. Previously he was a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, DC where he led the institute’s Science and Technology Policy Program, and prior to 1994 at the International Service for National Agricultural Research in The Hague, Netherlands. He is a graduate of the University of Adelaide, Australia, and obtained a doctoral degree in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Minnesota. His research deals with the finance and conduct of R&D globally, methods for assessing the economic impacts of research, and the economic and policy (especially intellectual property) aspects of genetic resources and the biosciences. Dr. Pardey is a Fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association and a Distinguished Fellow of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society. ROBERT PAARLBERG is the Betty Freyhof Johnson ‘44 Professor of Political Science at Wellesley College, and a Visiting Professor of Government at Harvard University. He has consulted on African agriculture recently for IFPRI, USAID, COMESA, the Department of State, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He is also a member of the Board of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the National Research Council and has published books on agricultural trade negotiations, environmentally sustainable farming, U.S. foreign economic policy, the reform of U.S. agricultural policy, and policies toward genetically modified crops. His latest book (2008) is titled "Starved for Science: How Biotechnology is Being Kept Out of Africa." PRABHU PINGALI (NAS) (STS Roundtable Member) is Head of Agricultural Policy and Statistics Division at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He was formerly an economist and Director of the Division of Agricultural and Development Economics at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 2002-2007. He was the President of the International Association of Agricultural Economists (IAAE) from 2003-2006, Vice-President of the IAAE from 1997-2000, and chairman of the program committee for the 24th International Conference of Agricultural Economists. Dr. Pingali has over 25 years of experience in analyzing food, agriculture and development policy in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Before joining FAO, Dr. Pingali was Director of the Economics Program at the Economic Program at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Mexico, the International Rice Research Institute at Los Baños, Philippines, and the World Bank’s Agriculture and Rural Development Department. He was a visiting scholar at Stanford University, Food Research Institute, and an Affiliate professor at the University of the Philippines at Los Baños. Dr. Pingali has authored nine books and over 90 referred journal articles and book chapters on food policy, technological change, productivity growth and resource management in the developing world. An Indian national, Dr. Pingali earned a Ph.D. in Economics from North Carolina State University in 1982. DYLAN RICHMOND (Staff) is a Research Assistant for the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS) at the National Academies. Before joining the Academies the fall of 2010, he attended Georgetown University and graduated with a B.A. in Economics in May 2010. While at Georgetown, Dylan was an editor for The Georgetown Voice. AMIT ROY has been the president and chief executive officer of IFDC since 1992. Under his leadership, IFDC’s programs have broadened to help create sustainable agricultural productivity around the world, alleviating hunger and poverty and ensuring global food security, 97

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF environmental protection and economic growth. Dr. Roy joined IFDC in 1978 as a chemical engineer and special projects engineer. Dr. Roy was instrumental in organizing the Africa Fertilizer Summit in Abuja, Nigeria, in June 2006. In June 2008, he spoke before the Hunger Caucus of the U.S. House of Representatives about the role agro-inputs such as fertilizers and seeds have in providing long-term solutions to the recent food crisis and global food security. Dr. Roy is now leading IFDC in the development of the next generation of fertilizers, which will more effectively release nutrients when crops need them. He is also working to expand IFDC’s successful fertilizer deep placement technology (FDP) from Bangladesh to Sub-Saharan Africa. Before coming to IFDC, Roy was a process engineer at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Dr. Roy earned a doctorate and a master’s degree in chemical engineering from Georgia Tech. There, he served as a charter member of the Lions Club and was elected to the Graduate Student Senate. He received a bachelor’s degree with honors in chemical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in Kharagpur, India. JENNIFER SAUNDERS (Staff) is a Program Officer for the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS) at the National Academies. Ms. Saunders has over 9 years of experience with the National Academies, including working on studies related to the health concerns of veterans with the Institute of Medicine’s Board on the Health of Select Populations and on several studies related to toxicology and risk assessment with the National Research Council's Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. She also has experience as an analyst with the Government Accountability Office, where she planned and conducted evaluations of health-related agency programs in response to Congressional requests. Ms. Saunders earned a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Mary Washington and a Masters of Public Policy and Masters of Public Health from The George Washington University. EMMY SIMMONS (Committee Member) is currently an independent consultant on international development issues, with a focus on food, agriculture, and Africa. She serves on the boards of several organizations engaged in international agriculture and global development more broadly: the Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), the Washington chapter of the Society for International Development (SID), and the Africa Center for Health and Human Security at George Washington University. Ms. Simmons co-chairs the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability at the National Academies of Science and leads a Roundtable working group on Partnerships for Sustainability. She completed a career of nearly 30 years with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in 2005, having served since 2002 as the Assistant Administrator for Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade, a Presidentially-appointed, Senate-confirmed position. Prior to joining USAID, she worked in the Ministry of Planning and Economic Affairs in Monrovia, Liberia and taught and conducted research at Ahmadu Bello University in Zaria, Nigeria. She began her international career as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Philippines from 1962-64. She holds an M.S. degree in agricultural economics from Cornell University and a B.A. degree from the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee. KOSTAS STAMOULIS (Committee Member) is the Chief of Agricultural Sector in Economic Development Service (ESAE) and Agricultural and Development Economics Division (ESA), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Dr. Stamoulis’s major 98

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF focuses include: the potential of the rural economy for growth and poverty reduction; changes in food systems and commercialization with effects on smallholders, rural development and rural poverty; analysis of trends in rural development analysis and practice; seed markets as a means of promoting the sustainable utilization of crop genetic resources; introducing food security objectives and policies in Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers; and behavioral economics and development policy. His field activities include: introducing food security and agriculture-related objectives and strategies in the Poverty Reduction Strategy Processes in Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Bhutan, Laos and Cambodia; and constraints facing small farmers in supply supermarkets in Honduras and El Salvador. Dr. Stamoulis holds a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of California, Berkeley and MS in Agricultural Economics from the University of Georgia. MAXIMO TORERO is the Division Director of the Markets, Trade, and Institutions Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute, leader of the Global Research Program on Institutions and Infrastructure for Market Development and Director for Latin America. He has fifteen years of experience in applied research and in operational activities. In this capacity as director and research program leader, he directs the activities of an IFPRI unit that conducts research, with special emphasis on M&E of infrastructure and rural development interventions in urban and peri-urban areas through the use of randomized experimental design. Prior to joining IFPRI, he was a senior researcher and member of the executive committee at Group of Analysis for Development (GRADE). He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Economics and held a postdoctoral fellow position at the UCLA Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR). He is also a professor on leave at the Universidad del Pacífico, and Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at University of Bonn, Germany. DENNIS TREACY (Committee and STS Roundtable Member) is Senior Vice President, Corporate Affairs and Chief Sustainability Officer, Smithfield Foods, Inc. As Senior Vice President, Mr. Treacy oversees and directs the company’s sustainability and corporate affairs programs, including corporate communications and government relations. Since his arrival at Smithfield, he has helped enhance Smithfield’s environmental, community and sustainability policies and initiatives to become a meat industry leader in Corporate Social Responsibility programs. Mr. Treacy has more than 30 years of experience in both the public and private sectors, having previously served as: Director, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality; Manager of Government Affairs, Browning-Ferris Industries; Assistant Attorney General of Natural Resources, Office of the Attorney General of Virginia; and Advisor for regulatory and policy issues at the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources and West Virginia Assistant Attorney General, Environmental and Energy Division. Mr. Treacy received his law degree from the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon, and his Bachelor’s Degree in Fisheries and Wildlife from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia. Mr. Treacy is a member of the Virginia State Bar and West Virginia State Bar. He serves or has served as a member on dozens of statewide and national boards and commissions. LAURIAN UNNEVEHR (Committee Member) is Director of the Food Economics Division, Economic Research Service (ERS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Laurian has published over 60 journal articles and book chapters on topics in consumer demand and food 99

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOF policy as well as numerous other publications and outreach reports. She is recognized for original contributions in measuring the consumer benefits from agricultural research, the changing structure of U.S. food demand, and the cost-benefit trade-offs in food health regulation. With coauthors, she has received the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA) awards for Quality of Communication and for Publication of Enduring Quality, recognizing contributions in food policy and food demand. Laurian was inducted as a fellow of AAEA in July 2009. Prior to coming to ERS to lead the Food Economics Division, Laurian was on the faculty of the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) from 1985 to 2008. Laurian received her Ph.D. and M.A. from the Food Research Institute, Stanford University and her B.A. in economics from the University of California at Davis. PAUL VLEK (Committee Member), a Soil Scientist, is Professor and Director of the Department of Ecology and Natural Resources of the Center for Development Research at the University of Bonn, a federally funded multidisciplinary research and teaching institute concerning sustainable development issues. Prior to accepting this post, he was a Professor and Director at the Institute of Agronomy in the Tropics at Georg-August University in Goettingen. Dr. Vlek is Editor-in-Chief of “Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems,” and Editor of “Applied Botany” and “Basic and Applied Ecology.” Dr. Vlek’s research interests include the world’s soil resources, agricultural use of land, and the evidence of ongoing degradation and desertification of the soil in many food-producing regions. 100