Appendix D

Biosketches of Committee Members

Paul J. Wallace, M.D., is director of the Center for Comparative Effectiveness Research at the Lewin Group. Formerly, Dr. Wallace was medical director of health and productivity management programs at the Permanente Federation. Dr. Wallace is an active participant, program leader, and perpetual student in clinical quality improvement, especially in the area of translation of evidence into care delivery using people-and technology-based innovation supported by performance measurement. As Kaiser Permanente’s (KP’s) medical director for health and productivity management programs, he led work to extend KP’s experience with population-based care to further develop and integrate wellness, health maintenance, and productivity enhancement interventions. He also is active in the design and promotion of systematic approaches to comparative effectiveness assessment and accelerated organizational learning. Dr. Wallace was previously executive director of KP’s Care Management Institute (CMI) from 2000 to 2005, and he continues as a senior advisor to CMI and to Avivia Health, the KP disease management company established in 2005. Dr. Wallace is a graduate of the University of Iowa School of Medicine and completed further training in internal medicine and hematology at Strong Memorial Hospital and the University of Rochester. Board-certified in internal medicine and hematology, he previously taught clinical and basic sciences and investigated bone marrow function as a faculty member at the Oregon Health Sciences University. Dr. Wallace is a member of the Board for AcademyHealth and serves as board chair for the Center for Information Therapy. He has previously served on the National Advisory Council for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Medical



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Appendix D Biosketches of Committee Members Paul J. Wallace, M.D., is director of the Center for Comparative Effective- ness Research at the Lewin Group. Formerly, Dr. Wallace was medical director of health and productivity management programs at the Perman- ente Federation. Dr. Wallace is an active participant, program leader, and perpetual student in clinical quality improvement, especially in the area of translation of evidence into care delivery using people- and technology- based innovation supported by performance measurement. As Kaiser Permanente’s (KP’s) medical director for health and productivity manage- ment programs, he led work to extend KP’s experience with population- based care to further develop and integrate wellness, health maintenance, and productivity enhancement interventions. He also is active in the design and promotion of systematic approaches to comparative effectiveness as- sessment and accelerated organizational learning. Dr. Wallace was previ- ously executive director of KP’s Care Management Institute (CMI) from 2000 to 2005, and he continues as a senior advisor to CMI and to Avivia Health, the KP disease management company established in 2005. Dr. Wallace is a graduate of the University of Iowa School of Medicine and completed further training in internal medicine and hematology at Strong Memorial Hospital and the University of Rochester. Board-certified in internal medicine and hematology, he previously taught clinical and basic sciences and investigated bone marrow function as a faculty member at the Oregon Health Sciences University. Dr. Wallace is a member of the Board for AcademyHealth and serves as board chair for the Center for Informa- tion Therapy. He has previously served on the National Advisory Council for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Medical 183

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184 PRIMARY CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH Coverage Advisory Committee for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Medical Advisory Panel for the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Technology Evaluation Center, the board of directors for DMAA: The Care Continuum Alliance, and the Committee on Performance Measurement and Standards Committee for the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). Dr. Wallace is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice and has participated in a number of IOM activities. Anne M. Barry, J.D., M.P.H., has 30 years of experience in state public service in a career that includes gubernatorial appointments to high-level leadership positions in four separate administrations. She currently serves as deputy commissioner for the Minnesota Department of Human Services, where she oversees both programmatic and operational activities. Immedi- ately prior to her recent appointment as deputy commissioner in January 2011, Ms. Barry was chief compliance officer for the Department of Health and Human Services, with responsibility for legal, ethical, licensing, internal and external audit, and program oversight activities. Before joining the De- partment of Health and Human Services, Ms. Barry was appointed deputy commissioner of finance in the Governor Pawlenty administration after 4 years in that position for the Governor Ventura administration. As deputy commissioner of finance, she was responsible for overall agency leadership and management in the areas of accounting, budget, cash and debt man- agement, economic forecasting, and financial information systems. Prior to her appointments in the Department of Finance, Ms. Barry was appointed by Governor Carlson as commissioner of health, a position she held from June 1995 to January 1999. She also served as deputy commissioner of health. Ms. Barry serves as adjunct faculty for the School of Public Health in the Academic Health Center at the University of Minnesota. She earned her juris doctorate from William Mitchell College of Law and her master of public health administration degree from the University of Minnesota. She also holds a bachelor of arts degree in occupational therapy from the Col- lege of St. Catherine. She is currently a candidate for a Ph.D. in kinesiology at the University of Minnesota. Jo Ivey Boufford, M.D., is president of the New York Academy of Medi- cine. Dr. Boufford also is professor of public service, health policy, and management at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and clinical professor of pediatrics at New York University School of Medicine. She served as dean of the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University from June 1997 to November 2002. Prior to that, she served as principal deputy assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) from November 1993

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185 APPENDIX D to January 1997, and as acting assistant secretary from January 1997 to May 1997. While at HHS, she served as U.S. representative on the execu- tive board of the World Health Organization (WHO) from 1994 to 1997. From May 1991 to September 1993, Dr. Boufford served as director of the King’s Fund College, London, England, a royal charity dedicated to the support of health and social services in London and the United Kingdom. She served as president of the New York City Health and Hospitals Cor- poration, the largest municipal system in the United States, from December 1985 until October 1989. Dr. Boufford was elected to membership in the IOM in 1992. She is currently the IOM foreign secretary and is a member of its Executive Council, Board on Global Health, and Board on African Science Academy Development. She attended Wellesley College for 2 years and received her B.A. (psychology) magna cum laude from the University of Michigan and her M.D., with distinction, from the University of Michigan Medical School. She is board-certified in pediatrics. Shaun Grannis, M.D., M.S., FAAFP, is a research scientist with the Regenstrief Institute, Inc. and assistant professor of family medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine. He received an aerospace engineer- ing degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and under- went postdoctoral training in medical informatics and clinical research at Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine. He joined Indiana University in 2001 and collaborates closely with national and in- ternational public health stakeholders to advance technical infrastructure and data sharing capabilities. Dr. Grannis is a member of WHO’s Col- laborating Center for the Design, Application, and Research of Medical Information Systems, where he provides consultancy on issues related to health information system identity management; the implementation of au- tomated patient record matching strategies; and collaboration with WHO on the design, development, and implementation of enterprise medical record system architectures. Dr. Grannis recently completed an analysis of automated regional electronic laboratory reporting that revealed substan- tial increases in the electronic capture rates for diseases of public health significance as compared with traditional, manual, paper-based procedures. He developed methods for protecting the privacy and confidentiality of protected health information used for public health syndromic surveillance. He also is project director for an ongoing initiative integrating data flows from more than 120 hospitals across the state of Indiana for use in public health disease surveillance and clinical research. He serves as director of the Indiana Center of Excellence in Public Health Informatics. Dr. Grannis oversees the development of operational standards-based laboratory data interfaces between public health clinical laboratories and an electronic clini- cal messaging application used by both public health officials and clinicians.

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186 PRIMARY CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH As co-chair of the U.S. Health Information Technology Standards Panel’s Population Health technical work group, he helped lead the development of technical interoperability specifications for nationally recognized public health information technology use cases. Larry A. Green, M.D., is professor and Epperson Zorn chair for innovation in family medicine and primary care at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Previously, he practiced medicine in Van Buren, Arkansas, in the National Health Service Corps. He has remained a faculty mem- ber throughout his career, during which he has served in various roles, including practicing physician, residency program director, developer of practice-based research networks, and department chair. In 1999 he be- came founding director of the Robert Graham Center in Washington, DC, a research policy center sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians focused on family medicine and primary care. He served on the steering committee for the Future of Family Medicine Project, which ad- vanced the development of the patient-centered medical home. He directed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Prescription for Health national program, focused on incorporating health behavior change in redesigned primary care practices. He is a founding board member for Partnership 2040, a community-based participatory research enterprise in the Denver area. Dr. Green has received the Curtis Hames Award and the Maurice Wood Award for Lifetime Contribution to Primary Care Research. He is a member of the IOM. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and performed his residency in family medicine in Roch- ester, New York, at Highland Hospital and the University of Rochester. Kevin Grumbach, M.D., is professor and chair of the Department of Fam- ily and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He is director of the UCSF Center for California Health Workforce Studies, co-director of the UCSF Center for Excellence in Primary Care, and co-director of the Community Engagement and Health Policy Program for the UCSF Clinical Translational Science Institute. His research interests include the health care workforce, innovations in the delivery of primary care, translational and implementation science, and racial and ethnic di- versity in the health professions. With Tom Bodenheimer, he co-authored the best-selling textbook on health policy Understanding Health Policy: A Clinical Approach and the book Improving Primary Care: Strategies and Tools for a Better Practice. Dr. Grumbach received a Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Health Resources and Services Administration Award for Health Workforce Research on Diversity, and the Richard E. Cone Award for Excellence and Leadership in Cultivating Community Partnerships in Higher Education.

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187 APPENDIX D He is a member of the IOM. He practices family medicine at the Family Health Center at San Francisco General Hospital, and chairs the Primary Care Steering Committees for the San Francisco Department of Public Health and the UCSF Medical Center. Fernando A. Guerra, M.D., M.P.H., is director of health for the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District. Dr. Guerra’s career reflects a long-standing interest and involvement in pediatric care, public health, and health policy. His expertise is in improving access to health care systems for infants, women, children, and the elderly and improving access to health care for migrant children. He is also active with local, national, and international forums on a variety of health issues. Dr. Guerra has served on the Commit- tee on Ethical Issues in Housing-Related Health Hazard Research Involv- ing Children; the Frontiers of Research on Children, Youth, and Families Steering Committee; the Committee on Using Performance Monitoring to Improve Community Health; and the Committee on Overcoming Barriers to Immunization. He is an IOM member and a former member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and has participated as a member of the Roundtable on Head Start Research. He has received the James Peavey Award from the Texas Public Health Association and the Job Lewis Smith Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics, and is a Kellogg Fellow of the Harvard School of Public Health, among many other awards and honors. Dr. Guerra holds a B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin, an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health, and an M.D. from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. James Hotz, M.D., is clinical services director and co-founder of Albany Area Primary Health Care, a community health center with 13 clinical sites that serves 40,000 citizens in rural Southwest Georgia. In addition to being a practicing internist, Dr. Hotz is heavily involved in health policy around issues of access and health disparity. He was a board member of the Georgia Association of Primary Health Care and was the first physician to be president of the association. Dr. Hotz served two terms on the board of the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC), is a member of the NACHC Clinical Services and Legislative Affairs Com- mittees, and is coordinator for cancer screening for the NACHC Quality Center. Since 2006 Dr. Hotz has been on the Steering Committee of the Georgia State Cancer Plan and is co-chairperson of the Early Detection and Screening Work Group. He is medical director and serves on the board of directors of the Southwest Georgia Cancer Coalition, an organization that he helped found in 2001. Dr. Hotz is a member of the Council of Regional Cancer Coalitions of Georgia and was chairperson from 2004-2008. He is active in medical education, serving on the faculty of the Medical College

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188 PRIMARY CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH of Georgia and the Admissions Committee of Mercer University School of Medicine. He is on the board of directors of the Southwest Georgia Area Health Education Center and was the founding president of the board in 1990. Dr. Hotz received the Clinical Recognition Award for Education and Training from NACHC in 1991, the Community Health Leadership Award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 1995, the Leadership Award of the Georgia Chapter of the American College of Physicians in 2008, and the James Alley Award for Outstanding Lifetime Achievement in Ru- ral Health Care in 2009. In 2011 he was made a Master of the American College of Physicians. He is the author of the novel Where Remedies Lie based on his experience as a rural health center physician. A graduate of Cornell University and the Ohio State University School of Medicine, Dr. Hotz started his career as a legislative assistant to Kansas Representative Dr. William Roy addressing health reform issues. Alvin D. Jackson, M.D., is former director of the Ohio Department of Health. Previously he served as medical director of the Community Health Services Center in Fremont, Ohio; he began his career at the center during his 4-year family practice residency. During his tenure, the center expanded access to services with a fully equipped mobile unit, which extended health care services to 12 counties and has served as an immunization center at local schools. Dr. Jackson also served as chief of staff at Memorial Hospi- tal in Fremont and staff physician at the Sandusky County Department of Health. He served as president of the Midwest Clinicians Network in 2000 and was clinician’s state representative to the Ohio Association of Commu- nity Health Centers in 2001. Dr. Jackson has received Pfizer’s Ohio Quality Care Award, HHS’s Clinician Award, and a Robert Wood Johnson Com- munity Health Leadership Award. He graduated from Andrew University in Michigan with a B.S. in biology, received his medical degree from the Ohio State University, and received an honorary doctor of humane letters degree from Heidelberg College. Bruce E. Landon, M.D., M.B.A., M.Sc., is professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School and professor of medicine at the Beth Is- rael Deaconess Medical Center, where he practices internal medicine. Dr. Landon’s primary research interest has been assessing the impact of differ- ent characteristics of physicians and health care organizations on physician behavior and the provision of health care services. He currently serves as principal investigator for an RO1 grant from the National Institute on Aging that involves studying the impact of physician financial incentives and other practice-related characteristics on the costs and intensity of care for Medicare beneficiaries. Dr. Landon has also been particularly inter- ested in studying organizational approaches to improving the quality of

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189 APPENDIX D care. He recently completed a national evaluation of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Health Disparities Collaboratives, the primary quality improvement activity for the nation’s community health centers. Dr. Landon has been interested in larger organizational entities, such as managed care health plans, as well, and has studied quality of care and patient experiences in Medicare’s managed care program. He has extensively studied the experiences of state Medicaid agencies with man- aged care and compared quality within Medicaid managed care and private managed care plans. He also developed a research program with vascular surgeons to study the comparative effectiveness of treatment strategies for vascular disease. Dr. Landon graduated summa cum laude from the Whar- ton School at the University of Pennsylvania with a major in finance. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and an M.B.A. with a concentration in health care management from the Wharton School. He also received an M.Sc. in health policy and management from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Landon is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation. Danielle Laraque, M.D., is chair of the Department of Pediatrics and vice president of the Infants & Children’s Hospital of Brooklyn, Maimonides Medical Center. Previously, she was chief of the Division of General Pe- diatrics and vice chair for public policy and advocacy at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics. Her academic appointments have included professor of pediatrics, professor of preventive medicine, and the Endowed Debra and Leon Black Professor of Pediatrics. Dr. Laraque received her B.S. in chemistry from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She completed her medical studies at UCLA, where she received the Roy Markus Scholarship. Her internship and residency were completed at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, where she was also a Robert Wood Johnson fellow in general academic pediatrics. Dr. Laraque directed the joint Mount Sinai Faculty Development Program for Primary Care and Clinician Research Fellowship (General Academic Pediatrics and General Internal Medicine), and over a period of about a decade trained countless fellows, residents, and medical students. She is a nationally and internation- ally recognized expert in injury prevention, child abuse, adolescent health risk behaviors, and health care delivery in underserved communities. In the past several years, she has focused on system changes to integrate the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of children’s mental health prob- lems in primary care settings. Dr. Laraque is immediate past president of the Academic Pediatric Association and was vice chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) District II (New York State). She was AAP representative as the 2001 U.S. Public Health Service primary care policy

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190 PRIMARY CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH fellow and was a member of the National Institute of Mental Health Stand- ing Committee on Interventions for Disorders Involving Children and Their Families (2006-2010). Catherine G. McLaughlin, Ph.D., is a senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR). and professor in the Department of Health Manage- ment and Policy at the University of Michigan. Dr. McLaughlin has studied various topics related to health economics. She has published numerous articles on issues surrounding the working uninsured, the determinants of health plan choice, and market competition and health care costs. Her current research interests are focused on the impact of health information technology on health care markets, Medicare beneficiary enrollment be- havior, patient-centered medical homes and low-income uninsured adults, disparities in health care utilization, and barriers to access. Dr. McLaughlin is an elected member of the IOM and the National Academy of Social Insur- ance and a member of the Council on Health Care Economics and Policy. She served as a senior associate editor of Health Services Research and is currently on its editorial board. J. Lloyd Michener, M.D., is professor and chairman of the Department of Community and Family Medicine at Duke University and director of the Duke Center for Community Research. He is a member of the board of the Association of Academic Medical Colleges, co-chair of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Community Engagement Steering Committee, a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Founda- tion Working Group on Public Health and Medical Education and the NIH Fogarty/Ellison Fellowship Program Selection Committee, and director of the Duke/CDC program in primary care and public health of the American Austrian Foundation Open Medical Institute. Dr. Michener is past president of the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research and past chair of the Council of Academic Societies of the Association of American Medical Colleges, and has served as a member of the board of the Association of Departments of Family Medicine and the National Patient Safety Founda- tion board of governers. He has played a leadership role in system rede- sign at Duke, including expansion of the physician assistant program and development of the master’s program in clinical leadership. Dr. Michener has focused on finding ways of making health care work better through teams, community engagement, and practice redesign. He has overseen the obesity and chronic disease prevention programs of the Kate B. Reynolds Trust, a program designed to lower chronic disease rates in low-income areas across North Carolina, and the obesity prevention programs of the North Carolina Health and Wellness Trust Fund. Dr. Michener earned his undergraduate degree from Oberlin College in Ohio in 1974 and his

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191 APPENDIX D medical degree from Harvard Medical School in 1978. He joined Duke as a resident in 1978, receiving the national Mead Johnson Award in Family Medicine in his senior year. He went on to become a Kellogg Fellow, after which he joined the Duke faculty in 1982. Robert L. Phillips, Jr., M.D., M.S.P.H., is a family physician and director of the Robert Graham Center: Policy Studies in Family Medicine and Primary Care in Washington, DC. The Graham Center functions as a division of the American Academy of Family Physicians, with editorial independence, staffed by a small research team focused on providing evidence to help inform policy making. It publishes extensively, most recently in the special primary care issue of Health Affairs, and was recently cited in both Parade magazine and Forbes. Dr. Phillips is a graduate of the University of Florida College of Medicine and underwent residency training at the University of Missouri, Columbia. He completed a 2-year National Research Ser- vice Award research fellowship and practiced in a federal housing feder- ally qualified health center in Boone County, Missouri. He now practices part-time in a community-based residency program in Fairfax, Virginia. Dr. Phillips holds faculty appointments at Georgetown University, The George Washington University, and Virginia Commonwealth University. He recently served as vice chair of the U.S. Council on Graduate Medical Education, which advises the U.S. Congress and the administration. David N. Sundwall, M.D., is clinical professor of public health, University of Utah School of Medicine, and vice chair of the Medicaid and CHIP Pay- ment and Access Commission (MACPAC). Dr. Sundwall served as execu- tive director of the Utah State Department of Health from 2005 to 2010, where he supervised a workforce of more than 1,200 employees and a budget of almost $2 billion. He was president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials from 2007 to 2008. Dr. Sundwall served as president of the American Clinical Laboratory Association (ACLA) from September 1994 through May 2003, when he was appointed senior medical and scientific officer. The ACLA is a not-for-profit organization representing the leading national, regional, and local independent clini- cal laboratories. Previously, he was vice president and medical director of American Healthcare System (AmHS), at that time the largest coalition of not-for-profit multihospital systems in the country. Dr. Sundwall has extensive experience in federal government and national health policy, in- cluding service as administrator, HRSA, Public Health Service, HHS, and assistant surgeon general in the Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Service (1986-1988). During this period, he had adjunct responsibilities at HHS, including serving as co-chairman of the HHS Secretary’s Task Force on Medical Liability and Malpractice and as the HHS Secretary’s designee

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192 PRIMARY CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH to the National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality (1981-1986). Dr. Sundwall is board-certified in internal medicine and family practice and licensed to practice medicine in Utah and the District of Columbia. Mary Wellik, M.P.H., B.S.N., is former director of public health, Olmsted County, Minnesota, and has practiced public health in the community setting in clinic services and administration. Her practice has focused on strengthening community partnerships to improve health status and the development of public health policy. Ms. Wellik is past co-chair of the Minnesota eHealth Initiative and is a member of the National Association of County and City Health Officials Informatics work group. She has held numerous leadership positions, including in the local Community Health- care Access Collaborative and in development of the Olmsted County Multicultural Healthcare Alliance. She served as co-chair of the Minne- sota Health Improvement Partnership, member (current) of the governance board of the Southeast Minnesota Beacon Program, chair of the Local Public Health Association of Minnesota, and co-chair of its Legislative Committee. Winston F. Wong, M.D., M.S., serves as medical director for community benefit at Kaiser Permanente, with joint appointments at the Permanente Federation and the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan. In this role, he is re- sponsible for developing and cultivating partnerships with communities and agencies in advancing population management and evidence-based medi- cine, with particular emphasis on safety net providers and the elimination of health disparities. Dr. Wong also is a member of multiple national advisory committees, addressing issues in cultural competence, health care access, and improving health care for vulnerable populations. A previous captain in the Commissioned Corp of the U.S. Public Health Service, Dr. Wong was awarded the Outstanding Service Medal while serving as both chief medical officer for HRSA, Region IX, and its director of California Operations. Dr. Wong received both his master’s degree in health policy and his medical de- gree from the University of California, Berkeley-San Francisco Joint Medi- cal Program. A board-certified family practitioner, he continues a practice in family medicine at Asian Health Services in Oakland, where he previously served as medical director. Dr. Wong also serves as vice chairperson for the National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians.