Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$107.25



View/Hide Left Panel

Page 399

Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

HUGH L. POPENOE (Chairman) is professor of soils, agronomy, botany, and geography and director of the Center for Tropical Agriculture and International Programs (Agriculture) at the University of Florida, Gainesville. His principal research interest has been tropical agriculture and land use. His early work in shifting cultivation is one of the few contributions to knowledge of this system. He was born in Guatemala and has traveled and worked in most of the countries in the tropical areas of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. He is chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Escuela Agrícola Panamericana in Honduras, visiting lecturer on tropical public health at the Harvard School of Public Health, and is a fellow of the American Society of Agronomy, the American Geographical Society, and the International Soils Science Society. His father, Wilson Popenoe (1892-1975), was a plant explorer who traveled extensively through the Andes and was a pioneer in the promotion of the more extensive use of Andean fruits and other crops.

STEVEN R. KING is currently chief botanist for Latin America for The Nature Conservancy's Latin America Science Program. Prior to 1989, Dr. King was a research associate with the Committee on Managing Global Genetic Resources of the National Research Council's Board on Agriculture. He received his B.A. from the College of the Atlantic in 1980, and his M.S. from the City University of New York in 1986. In 1988, he received his Ph.D. from the City University of New York, where he worked with the Andean tuber crop complex (potatoes, oca, mashua, ulluco, and maca) and searched for the wild ancestors of modern cultigens. He has done field work throughout Latin America as well as in Southeast Asia. From 1986–1988 he was a fellow of The New York Botanical Garden's Institute of Economic Botany.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 399
Page 399 Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Panel Members HUGH L. POPENOE (Chairman) is professor of soils, agronomy, botany, and geography and director of the Center for Tropical Agriculture and International Programs (Agriculture) at the University of Florida, Gainesville. His principal research interest has been tropical agriculture and land use. His early work in shifting cultivation is one of the few contributions to knowledge of this system. He was born in Guatemala and has traveled and worked in most of the countries in the tropical areas of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. He is chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Escuela Agrícola Panamericana in Honduras, visiting lecturer on tropical public health at the Harvard School of Public Health, and is a fellow of the American Society of Agronomy, the American Geographical Society, and the International Soils Science Society. His father, Wilson Popenoe (1892-1975), was a plant explorer who traveled extensively through the Andes and was a pioneer in the promotion of the more extensive use of Andean fruits and other crops. STEVEN R. KING is currently chief botanist for Latin America for The Nature Conservancy's Latin America Science Program. Prior to 1989, Dr. King was a research associate with the Committee on Managing Global Genetic Resources of the National Research Council's Board on Agriculture. He received his B.A. from the College of the Atlantic in 1980, and his M.S. from the City University of New York in 1986. In 1988, he received his Ph.D. from the City University of New York, where he worked with the Andean tuber crop complex (potatoes, oca, mashua, ulluco, and maca) and searched for the wild ancestors of modern cultigens. He has done field work throughout Latin America as well as in Southeast Asia. From 1986–1988 he was a fellow of The New York Botanical Garden's Institute of Economic Botany.

OCR for page 399
Page 400 JORGE LEÓN is one of the world's foremost experts on Andean agriculture. A native of Costa Rica, he received his Ph.D. in botany from Washington University (under the famed economic botanist Edgar Anderson). He became botanist and head of the Plant Industry Department at IICA in Turrialba, Costa Rica, and then spent seven years heading the Andean Zone Research Program at IICA in Lima, Peru. Subsequently, he was with the FAO in Rome and was for many years chief of FAO's Crop Ecology and Genetic Resources Unit. After leaving FAO he was chief of the Genetic Resource Unit, Centro Agronómica Tropical de Investigación y Enseñanza (CATIE) until his retirement. Dr. León is a fellow of the Linnean Society and author of some 60 technical articles, 5 bulletins, 2 books, and 40 technical missions and consultations. His book Plantas Alimenticias Andinas is a classic survey of the native crops of the Andes. LUIS SUMAR KALINOWSKI, Centro de Investigaciones de Cultivos Andinos, Universidad Nacional Técnica del Altiplano, Cuzco, Peru, received his degree of agricultural engineering from the University of Cuzco in 1961. Postgraduate studies were in phytogenics at the National University of Cuzco. From 1964 to 1975, he was associate professor of vegetative therapeutics at the University of Cuzco, while also serving with the Department of Agricultural Development of Cuzco Corporation (a quasi-governmental institution). He was concurrently an instructor at the University of Lima and the National Agricultural University at La Molina during 1974. Since 1975, Dr. Sumar has been a principal professor in the Agriculture Department of the University of Cuzco. He was made head of the department in 1981. Dr. Sumar has been involved with nutrition, pathology, genetic conservation, and plant improvement for many years, and has traveled worldwide as a plant collector and as a consultant. In 1982 he became the only civilian recipient of Peru's Gold Medal of the Order of the Sun, in recognition of his contributions to the nutritional well-being of the poor. NOEL D. VIETMEYER, staff officer and technical writer for this study, is a senior program officer of the Board on Science and Technology for International Development. A New Zealander with a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, he now works on innovations in science and technology that are important for the future of developing countries.