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Biographical Sketches of Committee Members PETER S. EAGLESON (Chairman) received his B.S. and M.S. in civil engineering from Lehigh University in 1949 and 1952, respectively. He received his Sc.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1956 and is currently professor of civil engineering there. Originally a fluid dynamicist, he moved into hydrology in 1964. Recently his research interest has been hydroclimatology, with particular atten- tion to questions of global scale. Dr. Eagleson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and of the National Research Council's Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources, and he was a founding member of the Water Science and Technology Board. He is a past president of the American Geophysical Union. WILFRIED H. BRUTSAERT received his B.S. from the State Univer- sity of Ghent in Belgium in 1958, and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in engi- neering from the University of California in 1960 and 1962, respec- tively. His area of expertise is hydrology. Presently he is professor of hydrology at Cornell University. His areas of research include flow through porous media, permeability, infiltration and drainage, microclimatology, evaporation, surface water hydrology, and hydro- logic systems. SAMUEL C. COLBECK obtained his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Pittsburgh in 1962 and 1965, respectively. He received his Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Washington in 1970. His area of expertise is properties of snow and ice. Currently he is a geophysicist 331

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332 APPENDIX D with the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Labora- tory. Previously he was adjunct professor of engineering at Dartmouth College. His areas of research include the properties of snow, including mechanics, electromagnetics, metamorphism, water, and heat flow; and growth of ice crystals from both melt and vapor. --r KENNETH W. CUMMINS acquired his B.A. from Lawrence College in 1955 and his M.S. in fisheries and wildlife and Ph.D. in zoology, both from the University of Michigan, in 1957 and 1961, respectively. His area of expertise is aquatic ecology. Previously he held positions at Michigan State University, Oregon State University, and the Uni- versity of Maryland. He is currently director of the Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology of the University of Pittsburgh. His research interests include the structure and function of stream ecosystems. JEFF DOZIER obtained his B.A. in geography from California State University, Hayward in 1968 and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in geography from the University of Michigan in 1969 and 1973, respectively. He currently holds a joint appointment as professor of geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he has taught since 1974, and as a senior member of the technical staff of the let Propul- sion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. His research in- terests include snow hydrology, remote sensing, terrain analysis, and image processing. He is also the chairman of the Polar Research Board's Committee on Glaciology of NASA's Science Advisory Panel for the EOS Data and Information System. THOMAS DUNNE is a hydrologist and geomorphologist who is a professor of geology at the University of Washington. He holds a Ph.D. in geography from The Johns Hopkins University. His research inter- ests include hillslope hydrology and geomorphology, and fluvial geomorphology and sedimentation. He is also a member of the Water Science and Technology Board's Committee on Water Resources Re- search and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1988. jOHN M. EDMOND acquired his B.Sc. in chemistry from the Uni- versity of Glasgow in 1965 and his Ph.D. in marine chemistry from the University of California, San Diego in 1970. Currently he is pro- fessor of marine chemistry at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include processes and mechanisms controlling the composition of oceanic and continental waters and sediments in space and time. He is a member of the National Research Council's Ocean Studies Board.

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APPENDIX D 333 VIJAY K. GUPTA received his M.S. from Colorado State University and his Ph.D. in hydrology from the University of Arizona. Cur- rently he is professor of hydrology at the University of Colorado- Boulder. Until recently, he was professor of civil engineering at the University of Mississippi and adjunct professor of civil engineering at Utah State University. His research has focused on scientific as- pects of water and solute transport in porous media, statistical mod- els of space-time rainfall, analytical modeling of hydrologic processes at the basin scale, and statistical structure of streamflows, including extremes. GORDON C. JACOBY obtained his Ph.D. in hydrogeology from Co- lumbia University in 1971. Currently he is a research scientist with the Tree-Ring Laboratory at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University. He is also adjunct associate professor with the Department of Geology and Geoaranhv at the Universitv of Mas- sachusetts, Amherst. ~ ~ J J SYUKURO MANABE acquired his B.S., M.A., and D.Sc. from Tokyo University in 1953, 1955, and 1958, respectively. His areas of exper- tise are climate dynamics and climate modeling. Currently he is a research meteorologist of climate modeling at the Geophysics Fluid Dynamics Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad- ministration at Princeton University. His areas of research include physical mechanisms for climate variation by use of mathematical models of climate and climate change resulting from the future in- crease of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Dr. Manabe was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 1990, just prior to the completion of this project. SHARON E. NICHOLSON received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in me- teorology from the University of Wisconsin in 1971, 1972, and 1976, respectively. Currently she is associate professor of meteorology at Florida State University. Previously she was adjunct assistant pro- fessor of physics at Clark University, assistant professor in the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University, and research associate in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Vir- ginia. Her areas of interest include tropical meteorology, climatic change, paleoclimatology and historical climatology, drought and arid lands, urban climatology and microclimatology, and remote sensing. an DONALD R. NIELSEN is professor of soil science at the University of California-Davis and chairman of the Department of Agronomy

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334 APPENDIX D and Range Science. He holds a Ph.D. in soil physics from Iowa State University and specializes in research topics such as monitoring wa- ter and solute movement within and below the root zone of plants and assessing the spatial variability of water-conductina DroDerties of field soils. 1 ~ 1 1 IGNACIO RODRIGUEZ-ITURBE received his M.S. from California Institute of Technology in 1965 and his Ph.D. from Colorado State University in 1967. Currently he is professor of civil and environ- mental engineering at the University of Iowa. Until recently, he was professor at the Instituto Internacional de Estudios Avanzados in Caracas. His academic and professional interests include analysis, synthesis, and sampling of hydrologic processes; stochastic modeling of natural phenomena; and design of data collection networks. Dr. Rodriguez- Iturbe is a foreign associate of the National Academy of Engineering. JACOB RUBIN obtained his Ph.D. in soil physics from the Univer- sity of California-Berkeley. Currently he is a research soil scientist with the National Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division, Menlo Park, California. He conducts and supervises research on water flow in unsaturated porous media and on transport of reacting solutes in sediments and soils. He is also a consulting professor at Stanford University, where he has taught and also supervised Ph.D. students. I. LESLIE SMITH acquired his B.S. at the University of Alberta in 1974 and his Ph.D. at the University of British Columbia in 1978. Currently he is a professor with the Department of Geological Sci- ences at the University of British Columbia. His areas of research include stochastic simulation of fluid flow and solute transport in porous media, transport processes in fractured rocks, and the role of ground water flow in geologic and ~eodvnamic Processes. O O ~ J 1 GARRISON SPOSITO received his B.S. and M.S. in soil science from the University of Arizona in 1961 and 1963, respectively. He re- ceived his Ph.D. in soil science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1965. He is currently professor of Soil Physical Chemis- try at Berkeley. Previously he served on the faculties of the Univer- sity of California, Riverside and Sonoma State University. His areas of research include the surface chemistry of soils, metal-organic matter reactions, computer simulation of soil solutions, and the physics of mass transport in porous media.

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APPENDIX D 335 WAYNE T. SWANK obtained his B.S. in forestry from West Virginia University and his M.F. and Ph.D. from the University of Washing- ton. His area of expertise is forest hydrology and ecology. At present he is project leader at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, USDA, Forest Service and adjunct professor in botany at the University of Georgia. Previously, he served as program director of ecosystem studies at the National Science Foundation. His areas of research include hydrologic process studies in the context of watershed-scale experiments, nutrient cycling and forest productivity, and atmospheric deposition to vegetated surfaces. EDWARD I. ZIPSER received his B.S.E. in aeronautical engineering from Princeton University in 1958 and his M.S. and Ph.D. in meteo- rology from Florida State University in 1960 and 1965, respectively. He is head of the Department of Meteorology at Texas A & M Uni- versity. Previously he was a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, including a period as director of the Con- vective Storms Division. He has organized national and international field programs to investigate the properties of storm systems. His research expertise is in mesoscale and tropical meteorology. STEPHEN BURGES (ex officio) acquired his B.Sc. in physics and mathematics and B.E. in civil engineering at the University of Newcastle, Australia, in 1967. He received an M.S. (1968) and Ph.D. (1970) in civil engineering from Stanford University. He has been a member of the faculty at the University of Washington since 1970 and cur- rently is a professor of civil engineering. Dr. Burges was a member of the Water Science and Technology Board until July 1989.

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