Classes of Constituents in Human Milk

Protein and Nonprotein Nitrogen Compounds

Carbohydrates

Proteins

Lactose

Caseins

Oligosaccharides

α-Lactalbumin

Bifidus factors

Lactoferrin

Glycopeptides

Secretory IgA and other immunoglobulins

Lipids

β-Lactoglobulin

Triglycerides

Lysozyme

Fatty acids

Enzymes

Phospholipids

Hormones

Sterols and hydrocarbons

Growth factors

Fat-soluble vitamins

Nonprotein Nitrogen Compounds

A and carotene

Urea

D

Creatine

E

Creatinine

K

Uric acid

Minerals

Glucosamine

Macronutrient Elements

α-Amino nitrogen

Calcium

Nucleic acids

Phosphorus

Nucleotides

Magnesium

Polyamines

Potassium

Water-Soluble Vitamins

Sodium

Thiamin

Chlorine

Riboflavin

Sulfur

Niacin

Trace Elements

Pantothenic acid

Iodine

Biotin

Iron

Folate

Copper

Vitamin B6

Zinc

Vitamin B12

Manganese

Vitamin C

Selenium

Inositol

Chromium

Choline

Cobalt

Cells

 

Leukocytes

 

Epithelial cells

 

and properties can be found in several recent review articles and books (e.g., Blanc, 1981; Carlson, 1985; Gaull et al., 1982; Goldman et al., 1987; Goldman and Goldblum, 1990; Hamosh and Goldman, 1986; Jensen, 1989; Jensen and Neville, 1985; Koldovskỳ, 1989; Lönnerdal, 1985a, 1986a; Picciano, 1984a, 1985; Ruegg and Blanc, 1982).



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