Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Barbara Abrams, Dr.P.H., R.D., is assistant professor in the Departments of Social and Administrative Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, and the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. She worked as a perinatal nutritionist for more than a decade and has conducted several epidemiologic studies on maternal weight gain, nutrition, and pregnancy outcome.

Lindsay Allen, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. She has conducted research on relationships between nutrition and the outcome of human pregnancy and lactation in the United States as well as in other countries. In recent years, her special interest has been the effect of marginal malnutrition on the function of women and children in Mexico.

Kathryn Dewey, Ph.D., is associate professor in the Department of Nutrition and associate director of the program in International Nutrition at the University of California, Davis. She has conducted research related to the biological and behavioral determinants of lactation performance, the impact of early nutrition on infant growth and development, and maternal and child nutrition in industrialized and developing countries. Dr. Dewey is secretary-treasurer of the International Society for Research on Human Milk and Lactation and has served on the Expert Panel on Core Indicators of Nutritional Status in Difficult-to-Sample Populations for the Life Sciences Research Office.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 287
Nutrition During Lactation Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Barbara Abrams, Dr.P.H., R.D., is assistant professor in the Departments of Social and Administrative Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, and the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. She worked as a perinatal nutritionist for more than a decade and has conducted several epidemiologic studies on maternal weight gain, nutrition, and pregnancy outcome. Lindsay Allen, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. She has conducted research on relationships between nutrition and the outcome of human pregnancy and lactation in the United States as well as in other countries. In recent years, her special interest has been the effect of marginal malnutrition on the function of women and children in Mexico. Kathryn Dewey, Ph.D., is associate professor in the Department of Nutrition and associate director of the program in International Nutrition at the University of California, Davis. She has conducted research related to the biological and behavioral determinants of lactation performance, the impact of early nutrition on infant growth and development, and maternal and child nutrition in industrialized and developing countries. Dr. Dewey is secretary-treasurer of the International Society for Research on Human Milk and Lactation and has served on the Expert Panel on Core Indicators of Nutritional Status in Difficult-to-Sample Populations for the Life Sciences Research Office.

OCR for page 287
Nutrition During Lactation Cutberto Garza, M.D., Ph.D., is director and professor of the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University. He has conducted research on milk composition, physiologic responses of full-term and preterm infants to human milk, and relationships of maternal nutritional status to milk production. Dr. Garza has served on several committees of the National Institutes of Health and on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on International Nutrition Programs. Armond S. Goldman, M.D., is professor of pediatrics, and chief of the Division of Immunology/Allergy at The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. He has conducted research on the immunology of human milk, anti-inflammatory properties of human milk, effects of length of pregnancy and lactation on the immunologic system in human milk, evaluation of lactation performance, and the evaluation of human milk for banking. Dr. Goldman chaired the International Conference on the Effects of Human Milk on the Recipient Infant, which was sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Jere D. Haas, Ph.D., is professor of nutritional sciences at Cornell University. He has conducted research on the maternal, fetal, and infant responses to stresses at extreme high altitudes as well as on relationships between maternal nutritional status and fetal growth, postnatal growth, and postnatal development and morbidity in Bolivia, Peru, Guatemala, Indonesia, and the United States. Margit Hamosh, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Pediatrics and chief of the department's Division of Developmental Biology and Nutrition at Georgetown University Medical Center. She is also adjunct professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Systems at the University of Maryland. She has conducted research on lung development as well as on fat digestion and absorption, lipid clearance, the composition of human milk, and the function of its components in the neonate. Dr. Hamosh has served on several committees of the National Institutes of Health. Francis E. Johnston, Ph.D., is professor and chairman of the Department of Anthropology of the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on the growth, development, and body composition of children and youth, especially in relationship to nutritional status. Janet C. King, Ph.D., is professor of nutrition and chair of the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. She has conducted research on nutritional needs during pregnancy and has published on the protein, energy, and zinc requirements of pregnant women. She has served on many national committees involved in establishing policies relating to prenatal care.

OCR for page 287
Nutrition During Lactation Ruth A. Lawrence, M.D., is professor of pediatrics and obstetrics/gynecology and the director of the Breastfeeding and Lactation Study Center at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. She was chair of the Surgeon General's Workshop on Breastfeeding and Lactation and has conducted research concerning motivation to breastfeed, lactation management, and maternal medications during lactation. Charles S. Mahan, M.D., is deputy secretary for health and state health officer for Florida, director of the Robert Wood Johnson Healthy Futures Program, and professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Florida College of Medicine. His special interests have been preterm birth prevention, food supplementation in pregnancy, family-centered maternity care, prevention of unnecessary cesarean deliveries, infant mortality, improved care for low-income women, and out-of-hospital birth centers. Mary Frances Picciano, Ph.D., is professor of nutrition at The Pennsylvania State University. She has conducted research on the content, bioavailability, and metabolism of protein, iron, folacin, and selenium in human milk. Her work has also included methods of measurement and selenium content of prepared infant cereal. Roy M. Pitkin, M.D., is professor and chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Before assuming this post in 1987, he was professor and head of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Iowa, Ames. He previously chaired the Committee on Nutrition of the Mother and Preschool Child of the Food and Nutrition Board, National Academy of Sciences. Sara A. Quandt, Ph.D., is associate professor of anthropology and of nutrition and food science at the University of Kentucky. She has conducted research on the interaction of breastfeeding styles, early infant growth, and maternal nutritional status. Her work has also focused on methodological issues in measuring dietary intake of infants. Kathleen M. Rasmussen, Sc.D., R.D., is associate professor of nutrition at Cornell University and program director of a National Institutes of Health training grant in maternal and child nutrition. Her research has focused on the effects of maternal malnutrition on reproductive performance, with an emphasis on lactation. David Rush, M.D., is professor of nutrition and community health and head of the Epidemiology Program at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, all at Tufts University. In the recent past, he was principal investigator of the National Evaluation of the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).

OCR for page 287
Nutrition During Lactation John W. Sparks, M.D., is associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado. A neonatologist, he has served as director of Newborn Services and medical director of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at University Hospital, Denver. His scientific interests include the physiology, metabolism, and nutrition of the fetus and newborn. Mervyn Susser, M.B., B.Ch., D.P.H., is Sergievsky Professor of Epidemiology and founder and director of the Sergievsky Center at Columbia University in New York. The Center is endowed for the study of the epidemiology of neurodevelopmental disorders. He has also been head of epidemiology in the Columbia University School of Public Health. His work covers several specific fields, including prenatal development and prenatal nutrition, as well as such general topics as causality and the social sciences in epidemiology.