TABLE 4-2 Lipoprotein Lipids and Apoproteins for Lactating and Nonlactating Women 6 Weeks Post Partuma

 

Mean Value, mg/dl ± SDb

Type of Lipoprotein

Lactating Women (N = 56)

Nonlactating Women (N = 16)

Total

Triglyceridesc

92 ± 71

112 ± 56

Cholesterolc

207 ± 31

188 ± 29

Phospholipids

227 ± 29

217 ± 32

Apoprotein B

79 ± 29

69 ± 20

Very low density lipoprotein

Triglyceridesc

54 ± 67

78 ± 52

Cholesterol

14 ± 14

17 ± 11

Phospholipidsc

16 ± 17

24 ± 16

Apoprotein B

3 ± 3

4 ± 2

Low-density lipoprotein

Triglycerides

26 ± 12

24 ± 9

Cholesterol

129 ± 31

121 ± 30

Phospholipids

70 ± 21

70 ± 26

Apoprotein B

76 ± 28

66 ± 20

High-density lipoprotein

Triglycerides

12 ± 5

10 ± 4

Cholesterolc

65 ± 15

51 ± 8

Phospholipidsc

141 ± 22

123 ± 20

Apoprotein A-Ic

142 ± 23

126 ± 19

Apoprotein A-IIc

34 ± 6

31 ± 3

a From Knoop et al. (1985) with permission.

b SD = Standard deviation.

c Significant difference (p < .05) between lactating and nonlactating subjects.

These measurements (like those for biochemical indicators) have been reported for very few women at any stage of lactation. Two longitudinal studies (Butte and Garza, 1986; Butte et al., 1984; Manning-Dalton and Allen, 1983) and one abstract (Heinig et al., 1990) provide the data base for examining anthropometric changes during lactation. These data reveal a consistent average rate of weight loss of 0.6 to 0.8 kg/month during the first 4 to 6 months post partum, although mean weight early in lactation differed among the groups of women studied (Figure 4-1). Heinig and colleagues (1990) followed lactating women longitudinally for 12 months and found that, on average, weight loss continued between 6 and 12 months post partum, but at a slower rate than that in the first 6 months.

Not all the lactating women studied lost weight post partum; for example,



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