APPENDIX D
COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES

Lori B. Andrews, J.D., a research fellow at the American Bar Foundation and a senior scholar at the Center for Clinical Ethics at the University of Chicago, is the author of numerous articles and books including Legal Liability and Quality Assurance in Newborn Screening (1985) and Medical Genetics: A Legal Frontier (1987). She has written extensively on issues related to newborn screening and genetic technologies and has lectured widely on the legal and ethical issues involved in HIV screening of pregnant women and newborns.

Molly J. Coye, M.D., M.P.H., M.A., is currently chair of the Division of Public Health Practice at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. She completed her term as commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Health in December 1989. Prior to joining the New Jersey Department of Health, Dr. Coye served as special adviser for health planning to Governor Thomas Kean's Office of Policy and Planning. In that capacity, she developed programs to address state health problems in three areas: maternal and child health, indigent care and hospital reimbursement, and occupational and environmental hazards. She has been chair of the Executive Board of the American Public Health Association and is affiliated with the Maryland Public Health Association, the American College of Preventive Medicine, the Society for Occupational and Environmental Health, and the National Association for Public Health Policy.

Robert A. Derzon, M.B.A., joined Lewin/ICF as vice president in 1980 and in 1984 opened the firm's San Francisco office, which he now directs. He also directs the Lewin/ICF institutional health care practice. Mr. Derzon has more than two decades of experience in administering public and private teaching hospitals and in public service and education. He was the first administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration, the



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HIV Screening of Pregnant Women and Newborns APPENDIX D COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES Lori B. Andrews, J.D., a research fellow at the American Bar Foundation and a senior scholar at the Center for Clinical Ethics at the University of Chicago, is the author of numerous articles and books including Legal Liability and Quality Assurance in Newborn Screening (1985) and Medical Genetics: A Legal Frontier (1987). She has written extensively on issues related to newborn screening and genetic technologies and has lectured widely on the legal and ethical issues involved in HIV screening of pregnant women and newborns. Molly J. Coye, M.D., M.P.H., M.A., is currently chair of the Division of Public Health Practice at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. She completed her term as commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Health in December 1989. Prior to joining the New Jersey Department of Health, Dr. Coye served as special adviser for health planning to Governor Thomas Kean's Office of Policy and Planning. In that capacity, she developed programs to address state health problems in three areas: maternal and child health, indigent care and hospital reimbursement, and occupational and environmental hazards. She has been chair of the Executive Board of the American Public Health Association and is affiliated with the Maryland Public Health Association, the American College of Preventive Medicine, the Society for Occupational and Environmental Health, and the National Association for Public Health Policy. Robert A. Derzon, M.B.A., joined Lewin/ICF as vice president in 1980 and in 1984 opened the firm's San Francisco office, which he now directs. He also directs the Lewin/ICF institutional health care practice. Mr. Derzon has more than two decades of experience in administering public and private teaching hospitals and in public service and education. He was the first administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration, the

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HIV Screening of Pregnant Women and Newborns agency responsible for administering the Medicare program and the federal government's participation in Medicaid and other health financing programs. From 1970 to 1977, he directed the University of California, San Francisco, hospital and clinics. He also served as first deputy commissioner of hospitals in New York City and as associate administrator of the New York University Medical Center. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and is currently chairman of the board of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Norman C. Fost, M.D., is professor and vice chairman of pediatrics and director of the Program in Medical Ethics at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine. He is also chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics' Committee on Bioethics. At Wisconsin, he directs the Residency Training Program, coordinates the Child Protection Team, and serves as chairman of the Hospital Ethics Committee and the Institutional Review Board. He is the author of numerous publications on ethical and legal issues in health care, particularly those involving children, and was a consultant to the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Committee on Screening for Inborn Errors of Metabolism, whose report (Genetic Screening: Programs, Principles, and Research ) was published in 1975. Laurence R. Foster, M.D., M.S., M.P.H, is state epidemiologist for the Oregon Health Division. He received his medical training at the University of Oregon Medical School and his M.P.H. and M.S. degrees in epidemiology from the Harvard University School of Public Health. He has served as a local public health officer and has thirteen years of experience in public health epidemiology at the state level. He managed the development of Oregon's HIV prevention program. Since 1985 he has served on numerous national HIV policy and guideline-setting panels. He is president-elect of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists and the AIDS representative of that organization. Rodney Hoff, D.Sc., M.P.H., is currently chief of the Pediatric and Family Section in the Epidemiology Branch of the Division of AIDS of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Prior to joining NIH in April 1990, Dr. Hoff was assistant director of the New England Regional Newborn Screening Program at the Massachusetts Public Health Laboratory and associate professor of community health at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. Dr. Hoff's research interests include the epidemiology of perinatally acquired HIV infection and the development of methods for the diagnosis of HIV infection in infants. Dr. Hoff's group at the Massachu-

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HIV Screening of Pregnant Women and Newborns setts Public Health Laboratory developed the methodology for estimating the seroprevalence of HIV among childbearing women by testing anonymous samples of blood collected for routine newborn screening tests. Michael M. Kaback, M.D., is professor and chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego, and pediatrician-in-chief at the Children's Hospital of San Diego. He also serves as director of the State of California's Tay-Sachs Disease Prevention Program and as director of the International Center for Tay-Sachs Disease Quality Control and Data Collection. Dr. Kaback is currently editor for North America for the international journal Prenatal Diagnosis and is president-elect of the American Society of Human Genetics. He is the author of numerous scientific and medical publications and is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Pediatric Society, the Society of Pediatric Research, and the American Federation for Clinical Research. Dr. Kaback's major research interests include the application of biochemical and molecular methods to the delineation and detection of genetic disease and the psychosocial implications of applying genetic technology to large populations. Marie C. McCormick, M.D., Sc.D., is currently associate professor of pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School and a member of the Joint Program in Neonatology, where she is director of the Infant Follow-Up Program. Her training at Johns Hopkins University included the Clinical Scholars Program in which she combined a residency in pediatrics with a doctoral degree in health program evaluation. Since then, Dr. McCormick has conducted several large-sole program evaluations and assessed perinatal programs among disadvantaged women. In addition, she is a nationally recognized expert in approaches to defining appropriate infant/child outcomes. Her research interests have continued in this area with a primary focus on the effect of perinatal and neonatal health services in improving the health of high-risk infants. Dr. McCormick was a member of the previous IOM Committee to Study the Prevention of Low Birthweight and also contributed to the work of the IOM Committee to Study Outreach for Prenatal Care. Barbara J. Sabol, R.N., M.A., is currently administrator/commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration. Prior to this appointment, she served as executive deputy commissioner of the New York State Department of Social Services. From 1983 until 1987, Ms. Sabol served as secretary of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. During the Carter administration, she administered the Title XX program in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)

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HIV Screening of Pregnant Women and Newborns and directed the ten regional offices of the Office of Human Development Services. Following her tenure at DHHS, Ms. Sabol remained in Washington as director of the Office of Policy and Planning for the District of Columbia's Department of Human Services. A. Eugene Washington, M.D., M.P.H., M.Sc., is co-director of the Center for Reproductive Health Policy Research, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. He is an attending physician in obstetrics and gynecology at San Francisco General Hospital and holds appointments in the Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and the Institute for Health Policy Studies. HIS research focuses on the prevention of diseases in women, cost-effectiveness of medical practices and public health programs, and development of health policy. He is recognized internationally for his work on prevention and treatment policy for sexually transmitted diseases.