Biographical Sketches

JAMES V.NEEL is Lee R.Dice Distinguished University Professor of Human Genetics, Emeritus, and Professor of Internal Medicine, Emeritus, at The University of Michigan Medical School, where for 25 years he was chairman of the Department of Human Genetics, the first such department in the country. He received his Ph.D. and M.D. degrees at the University of Rochester. Elections to learned societies include the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has been President of the American Society of Human Genetics and of the Sixth International Congress of Human Genetics, and has served on numerous national and international advisory committees. Honors include the Allan Award of the American Society of Human Genetics, the Lasker Award of the American Public Health Association, the Presidential Medal of Science, and the Medal of the Smithsonian Institution. His association with the investigations reported in this book began in 1946, when he went to Japan as a member of a five-man team charged to advise the National Academy on the feasibility of studies on the delayed effects of atomic bombs.

WILLIAM J.SCHULL is Director of the Genetics Center of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences of the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, and Ashbel Smith Professor of Academic Medicine. Soon after the completion of his doctoral degree at Ohio State University, he went to Japan (in 1949) to participate in the genetics studies initiated by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. In the 40 subsequent years, he has served the Commission, and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, in a variety of positions—as head of the Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Chief of Research, Vice-Chairman, and is currently one of the Foundation's Permanent Direc-



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OCR for page 495
THE CHILDREN OF ATOMIC BOMB SURVIVORS: A Genetic Study Biographical Sketches JAMES V.NEEL is Lee R.Dice Distinguished University Professor of Human Genetics, Emeritus, and Professor of Internal Medicine, Emeritus, at The University of Michigan Medical School, where for 25 years he was chairman of the Department of Human Genetics, the first such department in the country. He received his Ph.D. and M.D. degrees at the University of Rochester. Elections to learned societies include the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has been President of the American Society of Human Genetics and of the Sixth International Congress of Human Genetics, and has served on numerous national and international advisory committees. Honors include the Allan Award of the American Society of Human Genetics, the Lasker Award of the American Public Health Association, the Presidential Medal of Science, and the Medal of the Smithsonian Institution. His association with the investigations reported in this book began in 1946, when he went to Japan as a member of a five-man team charged to advise the National Academy on the feasibility of studies on the delayed effects of atomic bombs. WILLIAM J.SCHULL is Director of the Genetics Center of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences of the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, and Ashbel Smith Professor of Academic Medicine. Soon after the completion of his doctoral degree at Ohio State University, he went to Japan (in 1949) to participate in the genetics studies initiated by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. In the 40 subsequent years, he has served the Commission, and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, in a variety of positions—as head of the Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Chief of Research, Vice-Chairman, and is currently one of the Foundation's Permanent Direc-

OCR for page 495
THE CHILDREN OF ATOMIC BOMB SURVIVORS: A Genetic Study tors. Prior to 1972, when he assumed his current position in Texas, he was a member of the Department of Human Genetics at the University of Michigan. Dr. Schull is a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, and a consultant to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.