Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

A. DAN TARLOCK, Chair, is a professor of law at Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago-Kent College of Law. He received his LL.B. from Stanford University. His professional experience includes private practice, consulting, and teaching. Mr. Tarlock has authored and coauthored many publications concerning water resource management, land use, and environmental law and policy, including a treatise and a casebook on water law. He is the vice-chair of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) and a member of its Committee to Review the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies.

D. CRAIG BELL, executive director, Western States Water Council, received his law degree from the University of Utah in 1973. He has served as secretary-treasurer and member of the Board of Trustees of Water & Man, Inc. He has published numerous articles on water rights, Indian water rights, and the states ' role in national water policy.

BONNIE COLBY, associate professor of agricultural economics at the University of Arizona (1983 to present), received her Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Wisconsin. She previously served as a policy analyst with the Department of Food and Agriculture, state of California. Her research and teaching focus on the economics of natural resource management and on valuation of environment quality, natural amenities, and water



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Water Transfers in the West: Efficiency, Equity, and the Environment Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff A. DAN TARLOCK, Chair, is a professor of law at Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago-Kent College of Law. He received his LL.B. from Stanford University. His professional experience includes private practice, consulting, and teaching. Mr. Tarlock has authored and coauthored many publications concerning water resource management, land use, and environmental law and policy, including a treatise and a casebook on water law. He is the vice-chair of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) and a member of its Committee to Review the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies. D. CRAIG BELL, executive director, Western States Water Council, received his law degree from the University of Utah in 1973. He has served as secretary-treasurer and member of the Board of Trustees of Water & Man, Inc. He has published numerous articles on water rights, Indian water rights, and the states ' role in national water policy. BONNIE COLBY, associate professor of agricultural economics at the University of Arizona (1983 to present), received her Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Wisconsin. She previously served as a policy analyst with the Department of Food and Agriculture, state of California. Her research and teaching focus on the economics of natural resource management and on valuation of environment quality, natural amenities, and water

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Water Transfers in the West: Efficiency, Equity, and the Environment rights. Dr. Colby has been one of the leading scholars in the area of water reallocation and was major author of Water Markets in Theory and Practice, a book published in 1987. She is a member of the WSTB's Committee to Review the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies. LEO M. EISEL, of Wright Water Engineering in Denver, Colorado, received his Ph.D. in engineering from Harvard University in 1970. From 1971 to 1973 he was a staff scientist with the Environmental Defense Fund in New York; later he became director of the Illinois Division of Water Resources, and from 1977 to 1980 was director of the U.S. Water Resources Council. He is a former WSTB member and was a member of the Committee to Review the Metropolitan Washington Area Water Supply Study. Dr. Eisel is broadly experienced in water supply planning and hydrologic engineering. DAVID H. GETCHES, professor of law, University of Colorado School of Law (1979 to present), received his J.D. from the University of Southern California. Previous positions include executive director, State of Colorado Department of Natural Resources, 1983 to 1987; founding director, Native American Rights Fund, Boulder, Colorado, 1970 to 1976; directing attorney, California Indian Legal Services, 1968 to 1970; and private practice. Mr. Getches has an extensive publication list, especially in the water resource management and Indian law areas. THOMAS J. GRAFF, attorney, Environmental Defense Fund, received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1967. Previous positions include lobbyist for New York City and clerk for a federal judge and teaching law at the University of California, Berkeley, and Harvard. He was a governor 's appointee to the Colorado River Board of California and a member of the Citizens Advisory Committee to the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program. FRANK GREGG, professor, Department of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona, is a former director of the Bureau of Land Management and former chairman of the New England River Basins Commission. He recently directed the first phase of a continuing study of severe drought coping strategies for the U.S. Southwest and is principal investigator of a study now nearing completion of institutional innovation in the field of water resources. He served on the Policy Subcommittee of the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on Irrigation-Induced Water Quality Problems.

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Water Transfers in the West: Efficiency, Equity, and the Environment R. KEITH HIGGINSON, director, Idaho Department of Water Resources, received a B.S. in civil engineering from Utah State University in 1957. His professional career has included water resource consulting engineering; water and agricultural research; commissioner, Bureau of Reclamation (1977 to 1981); and more than 23 years as a state water resource administrator. He is a former WSTB member and has also been a member of a number of interstate water resource boards and commissions. MARVIN E. JENSEN, director, Colorado Institute for Irrigation Management, Colorado State University, has a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Colorado State University. He was previously national program leader, Water Management/Salinity Program (1979 to 1987), and director, Snake River Conservation Research Center (1969 to 1978). He served as chairman of the Council for Agriculture Science and Technology Task Force on Effective Use of Water in Irrigated Agriculture (1988) and as senior editor of ASCE Manual on Evapotranspiration and Irrigation Water Requirements (1990). He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. DUNCAN T. PATTEN, professor of botany and director of the Center for Environmental Studies, Arizona State University (ASU), received his Ph.D. from Duke University. Other academic experience includes assistant professor of botany at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and associate professor and assistant academic vice president at ASU. He is senior scientist for the U.S. Department of Interior's Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon research program. He served on the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST) and the WSTB Committee to Review Glen Canyon Environmental Studies. He chaired the BEST committee on the Mono Basin Ecosystem and is on BEST's committee to study science in the national parks. He is also a member of the National Research Council's Commission on Geoscience, Environment, and Resources. CLAIR B. STALNAKER, chief, Riverine and Wetland Ecosystems Branch, National Ecology Research Center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; adjunct professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Colorado State University; and adjunct professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Utah State University, received a B.S. in forestry from West Virginia University and a Ph.D. in animal ecology from North Carolina State University in 1966. Previous experience with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service includes leader, Utah Cooperative Fishery Research Unit; leader, Instream Flow and Aquatic Systems Group;

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Water Transfers in the West: Efficiency, Equity, and the Environment fishery research specialist, Division of Federal Assistance and Endangered Species; and fishery research biologist, Western Water Allocation Program. LUIS S. TORRES is a staff member with Southwest Research and Information Center, Inc. He is currently working under a Ford Foundation grant in northern New Mexico, providing water management education and technical assistance to acequias and other community groups. He has worked continuously in community-assistance-related work in northern New Mexico for the past 18 years, including 10 years as program director of American Friends Service Committee. RICHARD TRUDELL, a member of the Santee Sioux Tribe in Nebraska, is executive director and principal founder of the American Indian Lawyer Training Program, Inc. (AILTP). Mr. Trudell has served on the boards of numerous organizations, including the Executive Committee and Board of Trustees of the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial and the National Board of Directors of the Legal Services Corporation under an appointment by President Carter. He is a member of the American and Nebraska bar associations and has been active in organized bar activities. He was appointed by the president of the American Bar Association to serve on its Commission on Opportunities for Minorities in the Profession. He received his law degree from Catholic University in 1972. HENRY J. VAUX, JR., professor of resource economics, Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, received a Ph.D. in natural resource economics from the University of Michigan in 1973. He has been director of the Water Resources Center since 1986 and has been employed by the University of California since 1970. He was an economist with the National Water Commission and an examiner in the Resources and Civil Works Division of the Office of Management and Budget. Dr. Vaux has written extensively on the economics of land and water resources. SUSAN WILLIAMS, attorney, Gover, Stetson, Williams & West, received her law degree from Harvard Law School in 1981. Previous experience includes lecturer in law, Harvard Law School; adjunct professor of law, Arizona State University; and chair and executive director of the Navajo Tax Commission. She has extensive experience dealing with Indian water rights and resources.

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Water Transfers in the West: Efficiency, Equity, and the Environment CHRIS ELFRING, a senior program officer at the Water Science and Technology Board, served as study director for the Committee on Western Water Management. She has worked with the National Research Council in various capacities since 1987, and has directed studies of irrigation-induced water quality problems, soil and water research priorities for developing countries, climate change and water resource management, and ground water recharge. ANITA HALL is an administrative secretary for the Water Science and Technology Board and served as project assistant to the Committee on Western Water Management. She has been on the staff of the National Research Council since 1987.