Page 349

F
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE

HARVEY V. FINEBERG (Chairman), Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and Professor of Health Policy and Management, is a leading figure in the health policy field in the United States. His research has focused on the process of policy development and implementation, assessment of medical technology, and dissemination of medical innovations. He was a founder and past president of the Society for Medical Decision Making, chairman of the Health Care Technology Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research, and a member of the Public Health Council of Massachusetts. He is co-author of two books, Clinical Decision Analysis and The Epidemic That Never Was, a policy analysis of the national immunization program against swine flu. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a prominent spokesman in the fight against AIDS.

JOHN C. BAILEY is Director of the Bear River District Health Department in Logan, Utah. He is Adjunct Professor of Public Health at Utah State University. He received his M.D. from the University of Utah School of Medicine. He is board certified in public health by the American Board of Preventive Medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for the National Association of County Health Officials. He has also been on several 



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 349
Page 349 F Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE HARVEY V. FINEBERG (Chairman), Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and Professor of Health Policy and Management, is a leading figure in the health policy field in the United States. His research has focused on the process of policy development and implementation, assessment of medical technology, and dissemination of medical innovations. He was a founder and past president of the Society for Medical Decision Making, chairman of the Health Care Technology Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research, and a member of the Public Health Council of Massachusetts. He is co-author of two books, Clinical Decision Analysis and The Epidemic That Never Was, a policy analysis of the national immunization program against swine flu. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a prominent spokesman in the fight against AIDS. JOHN C. BAILEY is Director of the Bear River District Health Department in Logan, Utah. He is Adjunct Professor of Public Health at Utah State University. He received his M.D. from the University of Utah School of Medicine. He is board certified in public health by the American Board of Preventive Medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for the National Association of County Health Officials. He has also been on several 

OCR for page 349
Page 350 advisory bodies to the Utah State Health Department, including one on the development and administration of public immunization policy. MARY LUZ COADY is Director of the Department of Pediatrics at Bryn Mawr Hospital, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania; Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics at the Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia; and a board-certified pediatrician in private practice in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. Dr. Coady received an M.D. from the Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania and completed residencies in pediatrics at Children's Hospital of San Francisco and St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and a member of the Pennsylvania Medical Society. LINDA D. COWAN is Associate Professor in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, at the University of Oklahoma, where she has been a faculty member since 1983. Dr. Cowan received her Ph.D. degree in epidemiology in 1979 from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. After completing her degree, she was a postdoctoral fellow in neuroepidemiology at Children's Hospital, Boston, and the Harvard School of Public Health. From 1980 to 1983, Dr. Cowan was Assistant Member at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation where she worked on the national, collaborative Lipid Research Clinics Program. Dr. Cowan's research focuses on cardiovascular disease in adults, especially studies to elucidate gender differences in risk, and on the epidemiology of neurological disorders in infants and children, especially childhood epilepsy. Dr. Cowan has served as a member of the Epidemiology and Disease Control Study Section for the National Institutes of Health, is on the Editorial Board of Brain and Development, and is a member of the American Epidemiologic Society. She is currently on sabbatical at the Department of Pediatrics, New York University Medical Center. MARIE R. GRIFFIN is Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine and Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. She received her M.D. from Georgetown University School of Medicine and her M.P.H. from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. She served as an Epidemiologic Intelligence Officer at the Centers for Disease Control. She is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Epidemiologic Society.  She is currently a Pharmacoepidemiology Scholar of the not-for-profit Burroughs Wellcome Fund. Her major area of interest for the past 5 years has been in the field of pharmacoepidemiology. RICHARD B. JOHNSTON, JR., is the William H. Bennett Professor of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and Director of Research Education, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He received

OCR for page 349
Page 351 his undergraduate and medical education at Vanderbilt University and his postgraduate training at Children's Hospital, Boston, and Harvard Medical School. He has been chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine and at the University of Pennsylvania. He is board certified in pediatrics and serves as a clinical immunologist for children. His clinical and research interests center about host defense against infection; his research involves the biochemical basis for the killing of invading microorganisms by phagocytic cells. He presently chairs the Advisory Committee for Vaccines and Related Biological Products for the Food and Drug Administration. MICHAEL KATZ is Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University and Director of Pediatrics at Babies Hospital, a division of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. He is also the Reuben S. Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Public Health (Tropical Medicine). Dr. Katz has a clinical specialty of infectious diseases and parasitology, and his research interests have dealt with host defense in malnourished children and mechanisms of latent virus infections. He is an author and co-author of original scientific papers dealing with these subjects and, with two colleagues, an author of a textbook on parasitic diseases. Dr. Katz is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a number of professional societies and a recipient of several awards, among them the Humboldt Award for Senior U.S. Scientists, given by the German government. He has been a visiting professor in universities in the United States and abroad. He has been a consultant to the World Health Organization, United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, and various government organizations. DARWIN L. LABARTHE is the James W. Rockwell Professor of Public Health in the School of Public Health at The University of Texas Houston Health Science Center. He received an M.D. degree from Columbia University and M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees in public health and epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a member or fellow of the American Heart Association, the Society for Epidemiologic Research, and the American Public Health Association and a diplomate of the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Labarthe's research interests include epidemiology and prevention, especially of cardiovascular and other chronic conditions among both children and adults; issues in the interpretation of epidemiologic evidence, especially concerning causation; and occupational and other environmental exposures potentially related to cancer. DAVID A. LANE is a Professor in the Department of Theoretical Statistics at the University of Minnesota. He received an M.S. in mathematics from the University of North Carolina and a Ph.D. in statistics from the

OCR for page 349
Page 352 University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Lane joined the faculty of the University of Minnesota in 1976. He has been a visiting professor at Duke University, McGill University, and Bocconi University in Milan, Italy, and he recently completed a sabbatical year as Director of the Economics Research Program with the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico. Dr. Lane was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1986-1987. He is a member or fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Statistical Association, and the International Statistical Institute. Dr. Lane's research interests include the assessment of causality of adverse drug reactions. FREDERICK MOSTELLER is the Roger I. Lee Professor of Mathematical Statistics, Emeritus, and Director of the Technology Assessment Group at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Mosteller received Sc.B. and M.Sc. degrees from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie-Mellon University) and A.M. and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton University. He is also the recipient of honorary doctorates from the University of Chicago, Carnegie-Mellon University, Wesleyan University, Yale University, and Harvard University. He is the author or co-author of numerous articles and books on biostatistics and mathematical statistics. Dr. Mosteller is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Sciences, and the International Statistical Institute and is past president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. BENNETT A. SHAYWITZ is Professor of Pediatrics, Neurology and Child Study Center, and Chief of Pediatric Neurology at the Yale University School of Medicine. Most recently, Dr. Shaywitz has been named Co-Director of the first federally funded Center for the Study of Learning and Attention Disorders. A graduate of Washington University (A.B., 1960; M.D., 1963), Dr. Shaywitz trained first in pediatrics and then child neurology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and served as Lieutenant Colonel in the Air Force before joining the Yale University faculty in 1972. Dr. Shaywitz's primary and long-standing research has focused on the neurobiological influences in learning and attention disorders, and the great majority of his over 200 articles and chapters emphasize the relationships between brain neurotransmitters and disorders of learning and attention. His most recent area of investigation involves the nosology and classification of learning and attention disorders. In addition to service on advisory boards of the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Shaywitz has served on advisory boards and committees at the National Institutes of Health, the Professional Advisory Board of the National Center for Children with Learning Disabilities, the Professional Advisory Board of the Reye Syndrome Foundation, and the Editorial Board of Pediatric Neurology.

OCR for page 349
Page 353 STAFF CHRISTOPHER P. HOWSON is Deputy Director of the Division of International Health and Senior Program Officer in the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He received an A.B. in sociology and anthropology from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California, Los Angeles. He has directed two other studies for the National Academy of Sciences assessing the role of diet in chronic disease risk and planning for an evaluation of the Artificial Heart Program of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. His research interests include epidemiology in public health policy, environment and population health, program evaluation, and health services research. CYNTHIA J. HOWE is a Program Officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. She received a B.A. degree in psychology from Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio, and has done graduate work in experimental psychology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Other projects during 10 years on the Institute of Medicine staff have included an evaluation of poliomyelitis vaccine policy options; a study of pain, disability, and chronic illness behavior; the setting of health objectives for the year 2000; and a review of the organizational structure of the National Institutes of Health. DOROTHY R. MAJEWSKI is a Senior Secretary in the Institute of Medicine and has been with the National Academy of Sciences for three years.  She served as project assistant on this study and previously was project assistant for studies on nuclear energy engineering for the Energy Engineering Board and on diet and health for the Food and Nutrition Board. MICHAEL A. STOTO is a Senior Staff Officer with the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He received an A.B. in statistics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in statistics and demography from Harvard University. He was formerly an associate professor of public policy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He recently directed the Institute of Medicine's effort in support of the Public Health Service's Healthy People 2000 project. His current projects address a number of issues in public health, health statistics, health promotion and disease prevention, and AIDS. CYNTHIA H. ABEL is the Administrative/Financial Associate in the Office of Administration and Finance at the Institute of Medicine. She received a B.A. degree in government and policy from the University of Maryland, College Park, and has done graduate work in technology man-

OCR for page 349
Page 354 agement. Prior to her current position, she was the research assistant with the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on the Safety of DOE Nuclear Reactors and the staff assistant with the National Research Council's Governing Board. MICHAEL K. HAYES has been an editorial consultant with the National Academy Press since 1985. He has edited numerous publications for the Institute of Medicine, including Assessing Medical Technologies, Confronting AIDS, The Medical Implications of Nuclear War, and Nutrition Labeling. Mr. Hayes also edits research articles published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy and the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, both of which are publications of the American Society for Microbiology, and reports of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.