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A Program Participants C. EUGENE ALLEN joined the University of Minnesota faculty in 1967 and became dean of the College of Agriculture in 1985. He is currently vice-president for the Institute of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics and director of the Minnesota Agricultural Experi- ment Station. Allen has also been a faculty member at the Univer- sity of Minnesota in two departments-animal science and food science and nutrition. His research on animal growth biology and the functional and nutritional characteristics of animal food prod- ucts is internationally known. Allen's research has been recognized through numerous awards from professional societies and has been recognized by a Distinguished Teacher Award from the College of Agriculture and the all-university Morse-Amoco Award for Outstand- ing Contributions to Undergraduate Education. His national leader- ship activities include major offices or initiatives for the National Academy of Sciences related to animal growth biology, agricultural science policy, food technology, and the role of food and agricul- ture. He presently serves on the Board on Agriculture of the Na- tional Research Council, National Academy of Sciences. Allen re- ceived a bachelor's degree from the University of Idaho and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin. ROY G. ARNOLD is provost and vice-president for academic affairs at Oregon State University. He was formerly dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences at Oregon State University. He began this appointment on December 1, 1987, following 20 years as a faculty member and administrator at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. HiS assignments at Nebraska included teaching, research, exten- sion, head of the Department of Food Science and Technology, dean and director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, and vice- chancellor of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Arnold received a B.S. degree from the University of Nebraska and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Oregon State University. He was 259

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AGRICULTURE AND THE UNDERGRADUATE presented with awards for outstanding teaching by the University of Nebraska and the Institute of Food Technologists. In Nebraska, Arnold worked closely with the Department of Economic Develop- ment and Agriculture to establish a center for food processing, marketing, and transportation. He has also interacted with various commodity and trade organizations in planning economic develop- ment initiatives. KARL G. BRANDT iS associate dean of agriculture and director of academic programs at Purdue University, where he also holds the rank of professor of biochemistry. He earned a B.A. degree in chem- istry at Rice University in 1960 and a Ph.D. degree at the Massachu- setts Institute of Technology in 1964, majoring in organic chemistry with a biochemistry minor. Following postdoctoral work at Cornell University, Brandt joined the biochemistry faculty at Purdue Univer- sity in 1966 and was promoted to the rank of professor in 1975. From 1981 to 1984 he served as assistant dean of the graduate school. He accepted his current position in 1984. In addition to his administrative duties, Brandt teaches an undergraduate biochemistry course each year. He has been recognized for excellence in teach- ing and counseling. His research expertise is in the area of kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation-reduction reactions. WILLIAM P. BROWNE was visiting scholar at the National Center for Food and Agricultural Policy of Resources for the Future in Wash- ington, D.C., through December 1991. He has resumed his duties as professor of political science and director of the master of public administration program at Central Michigan University (cMu). Browne began his association with CMU as an assistant professor in 1971. Since 1973 he has also advised private-sector and governmental units and agricultural sciences societies and foundations in areas such as citizen participation, grants, staffing, executive develop- ment, and agriculture and rural policy analysis. From 1985 to 1986, Browne was a visiting scholar with the Farm and Rural Economy Branch of the Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agri- culture, where he coordinated an interest groups project concern- ing the Food Security Act. He earned his M.S. degree in political science in 1969 from Iowa State University and his Ph.D. degree from Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, in 1971. In 1989 he received an Outstanding Academic Book Award for Prioate Inter- ests, Public Policy and American Agriculture (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1988). He has received 11 Creative Endeavor Awards at CMU, most recently in 1990, for education policy re- search, interest group politics, and public administration education. BRIAN F. CHABOT iS director for research at the College of Agricul- ture and Life Sciences and director of the Cornell University Agricul 260

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APPENDIX A tural Experiment Station. He is a professor in the Division of Bio- logical Sciences at Cornell University. He received his degrees from the College of William and Mary and Duke University. His research focus was on the ecology of native and agricultural plants, with extensive work on the impact of the environment on plant growth and physiology. Chabot played a leading role in establish- ing the Low-Input Sustainable Agriculture Program (LISA) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He currently serves on the advisory committee for the Northeast LISA Program and on several national committees dealing with sustainable agriculture. LYNNE V.CHENEYiS serving her second 4-year term as chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Her first term began in May 1986. Cheney directs the independent federal agency that provides grants to scholars, colleges, museums, libraries, and other cultural institutions to support research, education, preserva- tion, and public programs in the humanities. As NEH chairman, Cheney has written four major reports, including Tyrannical Ma- chines (washington' D.C.: National Endowment for the Humanities, 1990), which assesses current problems in American schools, col- leges, and universities and describes various promising efforts to institute reforms, and 50 Hours: A Core Curriculum for College Students (Washington, D.C.: National Endowment for the Humani- ties, 1989), which urges U.S. institutions of higher education to strengthen course requirements so that undergraduates study es- sential areas of knowledge. Under her leadership, the NEH has launched several programs aimed at improving education in Amer- ica~s schools, colleges, and universities. Cheney has written and spoken often about American education and the value of the hu- manities to one's professional and personal life. Before coming to NEH, Cheney taught at several colleges and universities and was a magazine editor and widely published author. She earned a bachelors degree from Colorado College and a master's degree from the Uni- versity of Colorado. She received a doctoral degree, with a special- ization in nineteenth-century British literature, from the University of Wisconsin in 1970. JERRY A. CHERRY iS professor and head of the Department of Poultry Science and chairman of the Division of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia. Born in Dayton, Texas, he received B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Sam Houston State College and the Univer- sity of Missouri in 1964 and 1972, respectively. In 1972, he joined the faculty of the Department of Poultry Science at Virginia Poly- technic institute and State University as assistant professor. He was named associate professor and professor in 1978 and 1984, respectively. Active in both undergraduate and graduate educa- tion, Cherry received a certificate of teaching excellence from the Virginia Tech Academy of Teaching Excellence. 261

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AGRICULTURE AND THE UNDERGRADUATE LARRY J. CONNOR iS dean for resident instruction and dean of the College of Agriculture of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci- ences, University of Florida, Gainesville. He was formerly profes- sor of agricultural economics and assistant director for planning, Agricultural Experiment Station, at Michigan State University. As assistant director for planning, Connor specified and developed pri- ority research areas, expert teams, project proposals, and funding. His own research interests are in the areas of agricultural produc- tion economics, farm management, and agricultural resource eco- nomics. Connor's committee assignments at Michigan State have included chairing the Task Force for Curricular Revitalization, Col- lege of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and chairing the Admis- sions Policy and Entrance Requirements Task Force. He has also served on numerous national committees. Prior to joining the Mich- igan State University faculty in 1966, Connor was an agricultural economist with the Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. He earned a B.S. degree from the University of Ne- braska and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Oklahoma State University. OTTO C. DOERING 111 is professor of agricultural economics at Purdue University, where he teaches at both the graduate and undergradu- ate levels and conducts research on policy issues related to energy and resource use. His international experience is in food and re- source policy. In lasso, as visiting scholar with the Resources and Technology Division of the Economic Research Service, U.S. De- partment of Agriculture (USDA), Doering assisted with analysis for resource and environmental issues in the lasso Farm Bill. He was also on leave from Purdue in 1981 and 1982 when he was visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley, studying trade and resource issues. Doering was awarded the Distinguished Policy Contribution Award by the American Agricultural Economics Asso- ciation in both 1978 and l also, their Extension Economics Teaching Award in 1977, and recognitions for quality communication in 1979 and 1 98 1 . Doering is past director of the American Agricul tural Economics Association, has served on national advisory boards for USDA and the U.S. Department of Energy, and has been a consult- ant to the National Academy of Sciences and the congressional Office of Technology Assessment. He is a member of Cornell Uni- versity~s College of Arts and Science Advisory Council and has served as chairman of the National Public Policy Education Commit- tee. His academic training includes a B.A. degree from Cornell University, an M.S. degree from the London School of Economics, and a Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics from Cornell University. FRANCILLE M. FIREBAUGH became dean of the College of Human Ecology at Cornell University in 1988; she is the seventh person to hold that title in the 6s-year history of the college. Firebaugh re 262

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APPENDIX A calved a Ph.D. degree from Cornell in 1962. She returned to Cornell to become dean after 26 years at Ohio State University, where she gained a reputation as a seasoned administrator. While at Ohio she served most recently as vice-provost for international affairs and was honored with a Distinguished Service Award at summer com- mencement in 1990. Firebaugh's academic life has a strong global flavor. Teaching and consultancies have taken her to Afghanistan, Egypt, India, and Malaysia. In 1988, Phi Beta Delta, an honor society of international affairs, awarded Firebaugh its first Faculty Award for Outstanding Accomplishments. She is a specialist in the area of family resource management, the author or coauthor of many scholarly articles, and coauthor of two books. ROBERT M. GOODMAN is scholar-in-residence at the National Re- search Council and a visiting professor at the University of Wiscon- sin-Madison. He is a member of the Board on Agriculture of the National Research Council as well as the board of directors of the Cornell Research Foundation, Inc., and of Genetic Resources Com- munications Systems, Inc. From 1982 to 1990, he was vice-presi- dent and then executive vice-president with responsibilities for re- search and development at Calgene, inc. Previously, he was on the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he was assistant professor ( 1974 to 1978), associate professor ( 1978 to 1981), and professor of plant pathology and a staff member of the International Soybean Program. He did undergraduate work at Johns Hopkins and Cornell universities. He received a Ph.D. de- gree from Cornell in 1973 and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Virus Research at the John Innes Institute in the United Kingdom. Goodman's research has dealt with several as- pects of plant virology and disease resistance. His work on the cause of bean golden mosaic disease led to his discovery of a new plant virus family containing single-stranded DNA genomes. The single-stranded DNA viruses of plants, called the geminiviruses, are now recognized as having major agricultural importance and as being an important tool in plant molecular biology. JOHN C. GORDON is dean and professor of forestry and environ- mental studies at the Yale University School of Forestry and Envi- ronmental Studies. Gordon began his professional career as a plant physiologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. In 1970, he Joined the faculty at Iowa State University, where he advanced from asso- ciate professor to professor, and then moved on to Oregon State University, where he was department head and professor of forest science. He earned a B.S. degree in forestry in 1961 and a Ph.D. degree in plant physiology in 1966, both from Iowa State Univer- sity. Gordon's research is documented in over 90 papers, chapters, 263

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AGRICULTURE AND THE UNDERGRADUATE / and books, and he frequently lectures on research topics within the general area of tree physiology. He is currently leading and directly participating in research on biological productivity in the Copper River Delta in Alaska, with the cooperation of the Pacific Northwest Forestry Research Station. He teaches courses in research nneth- ods, agroforestry, and leadership. Consulting activities include bus- iness, government, and private, nonprofit organizations. JO HANDELSMAN is assistant professor of plant pathology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Previously, she did postdoctoral work in the Department of Plant Pathology at Madison, which was supported by fellowships from the National institutes of Health and the American Cancer Society. Handelsmants undergraduate work was in agronomy at Cornell University, and in 1984 she earned a Ph.D. degree in molecular biology from the University of Wisconsin- Madison. Her research group studies the molecular and genetic basis of microbe interactions with plants. Handeleman teaches a graduate course in phytobacteriology in which she uses the current literature of plant pathology to teach students, through analysis and discovery, how plant pathology draws on and contributes to the broader principles of genetics, biochemistry, ecology, and system- atics. She also teaches an undergraduate course entitled Plants, Parasites, and People that uses examples from plant pathology, both historical and contemporary, to explore the social context of the uses of technology in agriculture. Handeleman is also a faculty participant in the development of a new certificate program entitled Agriculture, Technology, and Society. NILS HASSELMO is the thirteenth president of the University of Minnesota. Born in 1931 in Kola, Sweden, Hasselmo was intro- duced to U.S. culture through the novels of James Fenimore Coo- per and Mark Twain. As a student of Scandinavian languages and literature at Uppsala University, Hasselmo received the Mauritzon Fellowship for study at Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois, a college founded in 1860 by Swedish immigrants. There he received a B.A. degree in 1957 and then returned to the United States on a fellowship from Harvard University to earn a Ph.D. in linguistics in 1961. in 1965 he came to the University of Minnesota as an associ- ate professor of Scandinavian languages and literature. During 143 years at Minnesota, Hasselmo served as chair of the Scandinavian Department, associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts, and vice- president for administration and planning. In 1983 Hasselmo left Minnesota to become senior vice-president for academic affairs and provost at the University of Arizona, where he was known as a skillful negotiator and innovative policymaker. He returned to the University of Minnesota as its president in December 1988. 264

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APPENDIX A ROBERT M. HAZEN iS a research scientist at the Carnegie Institutionts Geophysical Laboratory in Washington, D.C., and professor of earth science at George Mason University. He received B.S. and S.M. degrees in geology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. degree in earth science at Harvard University. After a year of studies as a North Atlantic Treaty Organization postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University in England, he joined the Carnegie Institutions mineral physics research effort. Hazen is author of more than 160 articles and 7 books on earth science, materials science, history, and music. His research focuses on the close relationship between atomic structure and physical properties of materials. He recently led the Carnegie Institution team that discov- ered the identities of several record-breaking, high-temperature su- perconductors. Hazen's books have received widespread critical praise, and he is active in presenting science to a general audi- ence. At George Mason University he has worked closely with James Trefil in developing a course on scientific literacy and a companion text, Science Matters: Achieving Scientific Literacy (New York: Doubleday, l99l). He teaches a course on symmetry in art and science for undergraduates and developed a methods course for public school science teachers in the District of Columbia. Hazen serves on the board of advisers for the National Academy of Sciencets National Science Resources Center and is a writer of the National Science Foundation's class materials that are distributed during Science and Technology Week. RICHARD A. HERRE~ iS a private consultant in the areas of agri- culture and the environment. He was formerly government rela- tions scientific liaison for the Government Relations Office of ICI Americas, Inc., in Washington, D.C. In this position, which he as- sumed on February 1, 1987, Herrett was responsible for representing the company's technical interests on a range of issues, including agriculture, bioscience, and the environment before the appropriate regulatory and legislative bodies. Herrett joined ICI in 1970 as tech- nicaJ manager for the Agricultural Chemical Division in Goldsboro, North Carolina. In 1975 he assumed the position of director of research and development for the Agricultural Chemicals Division. A 1954 graduate of Rutgers University, Herrett holds a master's degree in agronomy and a Ph.D. degree in plant biochemistry from the University of Minnesota. He is currently chairman of the Chemi- cal Manufacturer's Association (CMA) Task Force on Global Climate Change and of the Association of Biotechnology Companies' Agri- cultural and Environment Committee. Herrett is also president of the C. V. Riley Memorial Foundation, a nonprofit organization that promotes dialogue about major agricultural policy issues. 265

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AGRICULTURE AND THE UNDERGRADUATE CHARLES E. HESS was sworn in as assistant secretary for science and education on May 22, 1989. He is responsible for the U.S. Department of Agriculturets research and education programs in the food and agricultural sciences, including general supervision of the Agricultural Research Service, the Cooperative State Research Ser- vice, the Extension Service, and the National Agricultural Library. Hess began his career with the Department of Horticulture at Purdue University in 1958. In 1966 he moved to Rutgers University, where he served as both associate dean and acting dean of the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences before becoming the first dean of Cook College at Rutgers. From 1971 to 197S, he was also director of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station. In 1 s~5 Hess was appointed dean of the College of Agricultural and Envi- ronmental Sciences at the University of California at Davis and as- sociate director of the California Agricultural Experiment Station. In 1988, he assumed the additional post of director of programs, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, of the California Agri- cultural Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service. Hess has served on the National Science Board of the National Science Foundation and as cochairman of the Joint Council on Food and Agricultural Sciences. He also chaired the National Re- search Councils Committee on a National Strategy for Biotechnol- ogy in Agriculture. WILLIAM P. HYTCHE iS chancellor of the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore (UMES), a position he was appointed to in June 1976 after serving as acting chancellor since 1975. Hytche received a B.S. degree from Langston university and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Oklahoma State University. He also studied at the University of Heidelberg, Oklahoma University, Oberlin College, and the Uni- versity of Wisconsin-Madison. Hytche came to UMES, then known as Maryland State College, in 1960 after having taught in the public schools of Ponca City, Oklahoma, and Oklahoma State University. Since coming to UMES, he has served as an instructor in mathemat- ics, chairman of the Department of Mathematics, dean of student affairs, and chairman of the Division of Liberal Studies. Hytche was recently appointed by President Bush to serve on his Board of Advisers on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. He is currently chair of the Mideastern Athletic Conference Council of Presidents and Chancellors. He provided leadership for the 18so Universities when he was chair of the Council of 1890 Presidents and Chancellors from 1985 to l also. ARTHUR KELMAN iS a university distinguished scholar in plant pa- thology at North Carolina State University. He received a B.S. de- gree in biology from the University of Rhode Island and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in plant pathology from North Carolina State Univer 266

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APPENDIX A sity. in 1949, Kelman joined the faculty at North Carolina State University in the Department of Plant Pathology, where he rose from assistant professor to professor and was Reynolds Distin- guished Professor from 1961 to 1965. in 1965 he was appointed professor and chairman of the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was named L. R. Jones Distin- guished Professor in 1975 and Wisconsin Alumni Research Founda- tion Senior Research Professor in 1984. Kelman returned to North Carolina State University in 1989 to assume his current position in the Department of Plant Pathology. Kelman has held leadership roles in numerous societies, and currently is chairman of Class Vl: Applied Biological and Agricultural Sciences, National Academy of Sciences. Kelman's honors include membership to the National Academy of Sciences; the Outstanding Instructor Award and Distin- guished Classroom Teacher Award, North Carolina State University; and the Spitzer Excellence in Teaching Award and the College of Agricul tural and Life Sciences Amoco Distinguished Teaching Award, University of Wisconsin-Madison. HARRY O. KUNKEL is dean emeritus and professor of life sciences in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Texas A&M Univer- sity. For over two decades he served as associate director and director of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and dean of agriculture. Currently in the departments of Animal Science and of Biochemistry and Biophysics, he teaches the undergraduate courses Principles of Animal Nutrition and Food and Humanity, the latter course being open to any major in the university. He also teaches a graduate course on contemporary Issues in animal agriculture. Educated as a biochemist with a Ph.D. from Cornell University, Kunkel has recently written on human values in agricultural re- search and in setting nutritional policy. He served as senior edu- cation consultant to the U.S. Department of Agricultures Project interact. JOSEPH E. KINSMAN, JR., is associate dean for resident instruc- tion, College of Agriculture, University of Wyoming. He received a B.S. degree from the Pennsylvania State University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Maryland. He joined the Col- lege of Agriculture at the University of Wyoming as assistant profes- sor of food science in 1966, was promoted to professor in 1976, and was named associate dean for resident instruction in 19631. Since then he has also served 2 years as acting head of the Depart- ment of Home Economics. Kunsman is currently chair of the Resi- dent Instruction Committee on Organization and Policy, Division of Agriculture. He served 6 years on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Joint Council National Higher Education Committee and 5 years on the USDA Joint Council on Food and Agricultural Sciences, 267

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AGRICULTURE AND THE UNDERGRADUATE including 4 years as a member of the Executive Committee. Kunsman has served on numerous university committees including the Fresh- man Orientation Review Committee, the Honors/Scholars Commit- tee, the Recruitment Task Force, and the University Coalition for Academic Success, where he chaired the Freshman Year Subcom- mittee. Kunsman has received several honors, including the John Ellbogen Outstanding Classroom Teaching Award and the Division of Student Affairs Outstanding Service Award. JANIS W. LARIVIERE earned a B.S. degree from the University of Iowa and an M.S. degree from Drexel University. She is a biology teacher at Anderson High School in Austin, Texas, and 1991 recipi- ent of the Anderson High School Teacher of the Year Award. A high school science teacher for the past 20 years, Lariviere has also been a teaching assistant in microbiology at Drexel University and a research assistant in cancer research at the University of Iowa and Thomas Jefferson University. During the past 15 years, she has presented 16 workshops to teachers and students. Her experience with developing textbooks and curricula is extensive. Lariviere has received numerous awards and honors, including the Tracor Scholar Award for Teaching Excellence, Travis County Engi- neering Society Outstanding Science Teacher Award, National Sci- ence Teachers Award for Innovations in Science Teaching, Texas Outstanding Biology Teacher Award, state finalist in the Presiden- tial Awards for Excellence in Science Teaching, Tandy Technology Scholar, and a GTE GIFT program grant for implementation of innovative ideas in math and science teaching. JAMES G. LEISING is supervisor of teacher education in agriculture at the University of California, Davis, and has a distinguished record of teaching in agricultural education at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Currently, Leising provides leadership for four major research and development projects focused on the improve- ment of secondary and community college agricultural curricula. He has published in professional journals and developed curricu- lum materials for secondary and community college teachers. Leising has also presented numerous workshops to agricultural teachers and presented papers at regional and national professional meet- ings. He has been active in professional organizations, serving as secretary of the American Association of Teacher Educators in Agri- culture, as president of its western region, and as a member of its board of directors. Leising received a B.S. degree in agricultural education from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, taught sec- ondary vocational agriculture in Nebraska, and completed M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in agricultural education and adult education at Iowa State University. 268

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APPENDIX A ROBERT J. MATTHEWS received a Ph.D. degree from Cornell Uni- versity in 1974. He is professor of philosophy and member of the graduate faculties of philosophy and psychology at Rutgers Univer- sity. He holds graduate degrees in engineering, French literature, and philosophy and has held visiting appointments at several uni- versities, including Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Western Ontario, and University of Bielefeld in Ger- many. Matthews? research activities are focused in three areas: the foundations of cognitive science, theoretical psycholinguistics, and ethical issues in agricultural and environmental policy. In the latter area of research, he is particularly interested in the way in which ethical considerations can and should influence the develop- ment and implementation of public policy and the ethical accept- ability of certain economic criteria for choosing among available policy options. He is the author of numerous scholarly papers, editor of Learnability and Linguistic Theory (NorweJI, Mass: KJuwer Academic, 1989), and coauthor of Public Policy, Ethics, and AgricuI- ture (New York: Macmillan, in press). EDNA L. MCBREEN iS director of the Office of international Pro- grams at West Virginia University. Prior to coming to West Virginia in 1988, McBreen had extensive professional experience in domes- tic and international education with a focus on agriculture, home economics, and adult education; training; and extension. She had worked as senior associate with Creative Associates in Washing- ton, D.C., where she developed cooperative linkages among uni- versities, colleges of agriculture and home economics, and agribus- iness organizations. McBreen also was an agricultural education specialist for the Africa Bureau of the U.S. Agency for International Development, assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural Education at Texas A&M University, and instructor in the Depart- ment of Home Economics at Southwest Texas State University. McBreen received a B.S. degree in home economics education from Cornell University, a M.Ed. degree in adult and extension edu- cation from Texas A&M University, and a Ph.D. degree in human service studies from Cornell University. She is on the board of directors of the Association for international Agricultural and Extension Education and a member of the American Association of Teacher Educators in Agriculture. RICHARD H. MERRITT iS professor of horticulture, Cook College, Rutgers University. His academic career has spanned 33 years, most of it at Rutgers University, with visiting professorships and visiting academic administrator roles at the University of California, Davis, and at the University of Puerto Rico. He has held full- and part-time academic leadership roles for much of that time. For 20 269

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AGRICULTURE AND THE UNDERGRADUATE years, he was director of resident instruction for the College of Agriculture and Environmental Science and dean of instruction, Cook College, Rutgers Unlverslty. Merritt's part-time administrative roles at the national level have included director of the National Agri- culture and Natural Resources Curriculum Project and executive liaison consultant for the U.S. Department of Agriculturets Project Interact, a national curriculum revitalization program. At the inter- national level, he was alternative chair of the Title Xll U.S. Agency for International Development Joint Committee on Agriculture De- velopment and chair of teams that designed research and teaching programs for colleges overseas. Throughout his career, Merritt has written and lectured about research on ornamental horticultural plants and academic innovation and program revitalization in agri- culture, natural resources, environmental studies, and the life sci- ences. In 1989 he was commissioned by the Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress, to write a paper on integrating agri- cultural and environmental studies in colleges of agriculture and natural resources. PEGGY S. MESZAROS iS dean of the College of Human Environ- mental Sciences at the University of Kentucky. She received a B.S. degree from Austin Peay State University, an M.S. degree from the University of Kentucky, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Maryland. She has pursued a teaching and administrative career in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Germany, Nebraska, Maryland, and Okla- homa. Her accomplishments at Kentucky include authoring over 50 journal articles, two books, and numerous national research presentations and major leadership roles in the American Home Economics Association, the Association of Administrators of Home Economics, the advisory board of the National Association of Ex- tension Home Economists, the National Higher Education Commit- tee, and the National Extension Committee. She is currently vice- president for public affairs of the American Home Economics ASSo- ciation and serves on the Executive Committee of Project 2000, a minority recruitment effort for the field of home economics. GARY E. MILLER iS associate vice-president for instructional devel- opment at the University of Maryland University College. He serves as executive director of the International University Consortium, a Remember course development and delivery consortium, and admin- isters the development of open learning courses and technology- based education materials for University College. He also heads the institute for Distance Education, which coordinates distance education activities among the 11 institutions of the University of Maryland system. Miller is the author of The Meaning of General Education: The Emergence of a Curriculum Paradigm (New York: Teachers College Press, 1988) and numerous articles and papers 270

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APPENDIX A on undergraduate curriculum and distance education issues. He earned a doctor of education degree in higher education from the Pennsylvania State University. WILLIAM H. MORLEY is the twentieth president of Texas A&M Uni- versity. He earned the B.A. degree in psychology and economics from Benison University and master's and Ph.D. degrees in industrial- organizational psychology from the University of Maryland. Mobley served as corporate manager of employee relations research and planning for PPG Industries. From 1973 to 1980, he served as director of the Center for Management and Organizational Research at the University of South Carolina. He came to Texas A&M Univer- sity in 1980 as head of the Department of Management, and in 1983 he became dean of the College of Business Administration. Mobley served as executive deputy chancellor of the Texas A&M University system from 1986 to 1988 and was named president of Texas A&M University in August 1988. His research and writing on organizational behavior and effectiveness are cited frequently. He is also vice-chairman of the Texas Association of University Chancellors and Presidents, vice-president/president-elect of the Association of Texas Colleges and Universities, and a member of the Council of Presidentts Executive Committee of University Re- search Associates, Inc. In logo, President Bush appointed Mobley to a 2-year term on the U.S. Commission on Minority I3usiness Development. LAURENCE D. MOORE is professor of plant pathology and head of the Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He graduated from the University of Illinois with a B.S. degree in horticulture and continued his education at Pennsylvania State University, where he received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. He has been at Vir- ginia Tech since 1965 and became the department head in 1985. He has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in stress physi- ology, plant metabolism, and disease physiology. Moorers research interests include air pollution, fungal diseases, and disease physiol- ogy. JAMES R. MOSELEY was appointed assistant secretary of agricul- ture for natural resources and environment by President George Bush on July 2, logo. As assistant secretary, Moseley is respon- sible for directing the policies and supervising the activities and programs of the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Soil Conservation Service. Before appointment to his present position, Moseley served as agricultural adviser to William Reilly, administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a position in which he advised the administrator on environmental issues that directly affected the 271

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AGRICULTURE AND THE UNDERGRADUATE agricultural industry. Moseley graduated from Purdue University in 1973 with a B.S. degree in horticulture. Following graduation, Mose- ley began a farming operation in Indiana that today is a grain and hog enterprise. He has also served with several public policy groups that work on agriculture and rural development policy at the local, state, and national levels. C. JERRY NELSON is curator's professor in the Department of Agron- omy, University of Missouri. He earned a B.S. degree in animal husbandry and an M.S. degree in forage production from the Uni- versity of Minnesota. HiS Ph.D. degree in forage physiology was awarded by the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1966. Nelson then joined the faculty at the University of Missouri in 1967, ad- vancing to full professor in 1975 and curator's professor in 1989. Nelson was a visiting research scientist at the Welsh Plant Breeding Station, Aberystwyth, Wales, from 1973 to 1974 and academic guest at the Swiss Institute of Technology, Zurich, from 1980 to 1981. MORT H. NEUFVILLE has been dean and 1890 research director of the School of Agricultural Sciences, University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, since 1983. Born in Portland, Jamaica, West Indies, he attended the Jamaica School of Agriculture, where he obtained a diploma in agriculture. He received a B.S. degree from Tuskegee institute and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in animal science from the University of Florida. Neafville served as assistant professor of animal science and head of animal science at Prairie View ARM University from 1974 to 1978 and then as associate dean of ap- plied science and technology at Lincoln University in Missouri from 1978 to 1983. He is also project manager of the Cameroon Root and Tuber Food Crops Research Project and associate director of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station. Neufville is a chair- man and member of the Association of 1890 Deans of Agriculture/ 1890 Research Directors. He serves on many other national com- mittees, including the Northeast Regional Council and the National Higher Education Committee, which are subcommittees of the Joint Council on Food and Agricul sure. DIANA G. OBLINGER is an academic discipline specialist in agricul- ture and life sciences at the Institute for Academic Technology. Her areas of expertise are biology, research and teaching in agricul- ture, and veterinary medicine. She received her academic training at Iowa State University, earning a B.S. degree in biology, an M.S. degree in plant breeding, and a Ph.D. degree in plant breeding and cytogenetics. Her previous professional positions include associ- ate dean and director of resident instruction as well as associate professor of agronomy at the University of Missouri-Columbia, asso- ciate professor of horticulture at Michigan State University, plant 272

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APPENDIX A breeder at DeKalb AgResearch, Inc., and adjunct professor at North Carolina State University and at Clemson University. A member of the American Society of Agronomy and the National Association of Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture, Oblinger has received sev- eral academic awards, including the Burlington Northern Outstand- ing Teacher Award, E. F. Cooper Academic Innovation Award, and Gamma Sigma Delta Outstanding Young Researcher Award. FRANK PRESS, president of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., has advised four presidents on scientific issues and has made pioneering contributions in several fields. He has been named most influential American scientist in annual surveys by U S. News and World Report three times, most recently in 1985. Press is recognized internationally for his study of the sea floor and the earth's crust and deep interior, and has made contributions in geophysics, oceanography, lunar and planetary sciences, and natu- ral resource exploration. In 1977, Press was appointed President Carter's science adviser and director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. He served on science advisory committees during the Kennedy and Ford administrations and was appointed by President Nixon to the National Science Board, the policymaking body of the National Science Foundation. Press participated in bilateral science agreement negotiations with China and the Soviet Union and was a member of the U.S. delegation to the nuclear test ban negotiations in Geneva and Moscow. He graduated from City College of New York with a degree in physics and received ad- vanced degrees from Columbia University. Press joined Columbia's faculty in 1952 and 3 years later was appointed professor of geo- physics at the California Institute of Technology. He joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1965 and in 1982 was named institute professor, a title reserved for scholars of special distinction. Press is coauthor of the textbook Earth (New York: W. H. Freeman, 1985), which is widely used in American and foreign universities. JAMES L. RAINEY, former president and chief executive officer of Farmland industries, the Kansas City-based farm supply and mar- keting cooperative, was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and grew up on a small Indiana farm near Indianapolis. He received a H.S. degree in agriculture from Purdue University in 1952. Rainey be- gan his professional career in 1954 as a sales representative with Allied Chemical Corporation. He has held sales and management positions in the agrichemical industry throughout his career and was president of Kerr-McGee Chemical and senior vice-president of Kerr-McGee Corporation before joining Farmland in 1986. Rainey has been an active volunteer in civic affairs throughout his career, with special interest in education and health care initiatives. He 273

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AGRICULTURE AND THE UNDERG~UATE recently retired from Farmland, but he continues working in volun- tary service and business consulting. SUSAN G. SCHRAM is assistant director of federal relations for in- ternational affairs at the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. She holds bachelor's and master's de- grees from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Maryland and has 15 years' experience at the county, state, and national levels. Schram has served as a county exten- sion agent and program leader in the Michigan Cooperative Exten- sion Service and came to Washington, D.C., in 1980 to serve as staff to the Joint Council on Food and Agricultural Sciences. She has worked as a consultant in the Washington, D.C., area since 1982 and, most recently, at the University of Maryland as special assistant to the vice-chancellor while completing her Ph.D program. NORMAN R. SCOtl~ is vice-president for research and advanced studies at Cornell University. He served as director of the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station and director of the Office for Research, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, from 1984 to 1989 after having served nearly 7 years as chairman of the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. He received a B.S.A.E. degree with honors from Washington State University in 1958 and a Ph.D. degree from Cornell University in 1962. He has been a member of the Cornell faculty since 1962 in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. Sabbatical leaves have been spent in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University and at the National Institute for Re- search in Dairying, Reading, England. Scott has been involved in bioengineering research for over 20 years. Recent projects have included electronic applications in agriculture. Scott was elected technical vice-president of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers in 1989 for a 3-year term. He received the Henry Giese Award in 1989, and was elected to the National Academy of Engi- neering in l coo. SAMUEL H. SMITH is president of Washington State University. Pre- viously, he was dean of the College of Agriculture, director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, and director of the Cooperative Ex- tension Service at the Pennsylvania State University. Smith has also been professor and head of the Department of Plant Pathology at the Pennsylvania State University and assistant professor of plant pathology at the University of California, Berkeley, where he had received B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in plant pathology. in 1965 he was a postdoctoral fellow at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Sussex, England, and in 1989 he received an honorary doctoral degree from Nihon University, Tokyo. Smith serves on several 274

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APPENDIX A committees of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. He is on the board of directors of the Wash- ington China Relations Council, the Economic Development Part- nership for Washington, and the Washington International Ag-Trade Center, and is a member of several committees, including the Steering Committee for Regional Telecommunication Cooperative of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, the American Council on Educationts Commission on Women in Higher Education, the Washington State International Trade Assistance Ad- visory Committee, and the Council on Competitiveness. PETER SPOtIS is national news editor for The Christian Science Monitor. Since he joined the Monitor in 1976, Spotts has served in various jobs: as a Midwest correspondent; as staff editor in national news, specializing in science and technology, defense and arms control, and economics; and as special projects editor. In February 1987 he accepted a newly created science writing post. The fol- lowing November, Spotts and three Monitor colleagues received the Forum Award of the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness for an April 1987 series exploring the future of nuclear energy after Cher- nobyl. Spotts was an editorial writer prior to becoming national news editor. PAUL B. THOMPSON iS director of the Center for Biotechnology Policy and Ethics and associate professor of philosophy and agri- cultural economics at Texas ARM University. He earned a B.A. degree in philosophy from Emory University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in philosophy from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Prior to joining the Texas ARM faculty in 1982, Thompson was visiting assistant professor of philosophy at Texas A&M, and in 1986 he was visiting scholar at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Thompson's honors include president of the Food, Agriculture, and Human Values Society; participant in the summer seminars of the National Endowment for the Humanities; fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations and International Affairs; and resi- dent fellow of the National Center for Food and Agricultural Policy, Resources for the Future. RAY THORNTON was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1990 from Arkansas' Second District. He is not a newcomer to the U.S. Congress, having served three terms in the House from 1972 to 1979. In 1978 he ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate. Thornton began his public service career as a deputy prosecutor for Pulaski and Perry counties in 1956 and was elected Arkansas attorney general in 1970. His congressional experience during the 1970s included chairing the House Subcommittee on Science, Re- search, and Technology, and serving on the House Agriculture and 275

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AGRICULTURE AND THE UNDERGRADUATE Judiciary committees. The l ssos became Thorntonts decade as an educator. From 1979 to 1980, he directed the Ouachita Baptist University and Henderson State University Joint Educational Con- sortium, was president of Arkansas State University from 1980 to 1984, and served as president of the University of Arkansas system from 1984 to 1989. Science-related achievements during the 1980S included chairing the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Pub- lic Policy of the American Association for the Advancement of Sci- ence. His congressional assignments today include the House Sci- ence, Space, and Technology Committee, Government Operations Committee, and Democratic Steering and Policy Committee. Thornton has a degree in international relations from Yale University and a law degree from the University of Arkansas. ANNE M. K. VIDAVER is professor and head of the Department of Plant Pathology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She served as the interim director of the Center for Biotechnology from 1988 to 1990. A native of Vienna, Austria, Vidaver graduated from Russell Sage College with a B.A. degree in biology, followed by M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in bacteriology with minors in plant physiology from Indi- ana University-Hloomington. Prior to joining the faculty at the Uni- versity of Nebraska-Lincoln, Vidaver worked at Brookhaven National Laboratory and as a research associate in plant pathology at the University of Nebraska. She is president of the American Phyto- pathological Society and a member of the Board on Agriculture of the National Research Council. Her research interests have fo- cused principally on plant-associated bacteria. She is adviser or consultant to several companies and federal agencies and is a member of the National institutes of Healthts Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee and the U.S. Department of Agriculturets Agri- cultural Biotechnology Research Advisory Committee. Vidaver has authored or coauthored over 130 scientific articles and one book. DONALD M. VIETOR is a crop physiologist in the Soil & Crop Sci- ences Department of Texas A&M University. He was a member of the Systems Task Force of the National Agricul ture and National Resources Curriculum Project from 1982 to 1986 and a contributor to the recent book Systems Approaches for Improvement in Agricul- ture and Resource Management (New York: Macmillan, 1990). He is currently participating in a research project, Ethics in Agriculture: Holistic and Experiential Approaches, under the sponsorship of the office of Higher Education Programs of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. CONRAD J. WEISER is dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences at Oregon State University. Until his appointment as dean in 1991, he was professor and head of the Department of Horticulture, Or 276

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APPENDIX A egon State University. Previously, lee was professor in the Depart- ment of Horticulture and Laboratory of Plant Hardiness at the Uni- versity of Minnesota, where he established the Laboratory of Plant Hardiness, taught graduate and undergraduate courses, and con- sulted and traveled internationally on research and graduate pro- gram planning. In his current position at Oregon State, Weiser provides liaison with Oregon commodity commissions and other producer and processor organizations, and he established the 70- member Industry Advisory Board that represents horticultural pro- ducers, processors, suppliers, and consumers in Oregon. He is adviser to the National Science Foundation's International Programs Division and external reviewer of research and educational programs at universities in 11 U.S. states and Canadian provinces and at the international Potato Research Center in Peru. He is a member of the Board on Agriculture of the National Research Coun- cil. Weiser received a B.S. degree from North Dakota State Univer- sity in horticulture and a Ph.D. degree from Oregon State University in plant pathology and physiology. PAUL H. WILLIAMS is professor of plant pathology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and serves as the director of the Center for Biology Education (CUE). Established in 1989, the CBE's mis- sion is to improve teacher and student education in the biological sciences. Williams developed the rapid-cycling brassicas (RCBS) that have up to lo reproductive cycles per year and serve as mod- els for his research on the genetics of plant-parasite interactions. In 1983 he established the Crucifer Genetics Cooperative, a network that distributes RCB seed and information to over 1,600 research- ers in 48 countries. Using the Robs, he initiated the Wisconsin Fast Plants and Bottle Biology programs in 1988, both supported by the National Science Foundation. These programs aim to in- crease the involvement of students in the biological sciences. WiJ- liams has authored or coauthored over 165 publications and 13 books. He teaches three courses at the University of Wisconsin- Madison and received a Distinguished Teaching Award there in logo. Williams received a B.S.A. degree in plant science from the University of British Columbia and a Ph.D. degree in plant pathol- ogy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He did postdoctoral work in plant biochemistry at the Boyce Thompson institute for Plant Research in Yonkers, New York. EDWARD M. WILSON is deputy administrator for the Cooperative State Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. His re- sponsibilities include providing agency-wide leadership for the plant and animal sciences programs. Wilson earned B.S. and M.S. de- grees from McGill University in Canada in 1964 and 1966, respec- tively, majoring in animal science. He earned a Ph.D. degree in 277

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AGRIC(JLTURE AND THE UNDERGRADUATE dairy science from Ohio State University in 1969. Wilson began his career with the Agriculture Department at Tuskegee University, where he was assistant professor and director of the Guyana Ranch Management Program. He later became dean of the College of Applied Sciences and Technology at Lincoln University in Missouri. At Lincoln he also was dean of cooperative extension, agricultural research, and international programs. Wilson has extensive experi- ence in international development and has traveled widely as an adviser and consultant on agricultural matters. AS a member of a Tuskegee University team, he visited the Republic of South Africa in 1974 and studied pubilc education and agricultural development in the homelands (areas designated for blacks). In IO84, Wilson served as senior scientist for agricultural studies conducted in eight African countries. He has authored numerous papers and scientific publications in agriculture and related fields. ALVIN L. YOUNG was detailed from the Executive Office of the President to the Office of the Secretary of Agriculture in November 1987 as the director of the Office of Agricultural Biotechnology. He assumed the permanent post of scientific director and science ad- viser on June 1, 1989. in addition to directing the activities of the office, Young serves as executive secretary of the Agricultural Biotechnology Research Advisory Committee, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and chairman of USDAts Biotechnology Council. He received a B.S. degree in agricultural sciences and an M.S. degree in agronomy from the University of Wyoming. He then earned a Ph.D. degree in herbicide physiology from Kansas State University. Young has conducted extensive research on the envi- ronmental, toxicological, and human health effects of insecticides and herbicides and was director of research for environmental is- sues at the Veterans Administration. He was the senior policy analyst for life sciences with the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and he has served as consultant or adviser to six federal agencies and the National Research Council. Young has authored many scientific books and articles on environmental issues, risk assessmen I, and scion ce policy. 278