Authors

F. Howard Kratzer is professor emeritus of avian science at the University of California at Davis, from where he received his Ph.D. in animal nutrition. His many concurrent positions include a visiting professorship at the University of Sydney (Australia), and the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sol (Brazil). His research interests are poultry nutrition, amino acid requirements of chickens and turkeys, vitamin needs and functions, minerals and mineral availability, and growth inhibitors.

J. David Latshaw is professor of poultry science at Ohio State University, where he has taught since 1970. He received his Ph.D. in nutrition from Washington State University. Research areas of major interest to him are factors influencing feed intake in poultry, and interaction of diet and growth efficiency.

Steven L. Leeson currently is a professor of poultry science at the University of Guelph (Canada). He received his Ph.D. in poultry nutrition from the University of Nottingham (England). His research areas are feeding programs for leghorn birds, interaction of nutrient supply from feed and body reserves, and energy evaluation of ingredients.

Edwin T. Moran, Jr., previously a professor at the University of Guelph (Canada), Moran has been professor of animal nutrition at Auburn University since 1986. He received his Ph.D. in animal nutrition from Washington State University. His research experience includes influence of nutrition and management on broiler yields, amino acid availability and performance, and feedstuff evaluation in broiler production.

Carl M. Parsons currently is assistant professor of animal science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his Ph.D. in animal science from Virginia Polytech Institute and State University. Research interests include poultry production and management with emphasis in the field of nutrition, and improved nutritional efficiency for production of poultry meat and eggs, particularly with respect to protein utilization.

Jerry L. Sell (Chair) is professor of animal nutrition at Iowa State University, where he has taught since 1976, and from where he received his Ph.D. in poultry nutrition. His major areas of research are energy efficiency of chickens and turkeys, and metabolism of minerals.

Park W. Waldroup is professor of poultry nutrition at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. He received his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry from the University of Florida. Among his research interests are studies concerned with nutrient requirements of poultry in terms of nutrient balance and interrelationships of nutrients, and effects of processing on nutritive value of feed.



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Nutrient Requirements of Poultry: Ninth Revised Edition, 1994 Authors F. Howard Kratzer is professor emeritus of avian science at the University of California at Davis, from where he received his Ph.D. in animal nutrition. His many concurrent positions include a visiting professorship at the University of Sydney (Australia), and the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sol (Brazil). His research interests are poultry nutrition, amino acid requirements of chickens and turkeys, vitamin needs and functions, minerals and mineral availability, and growth inhibitors. J. David Latshaw is professor of poultry science at Ohio State University, where he has taught since 1970. He received his Ph.D. in nutrition from Washington State University. Research areas of major interest to him are factors influencing feed intake in poultry, and interaction of diet and growth efficiency. Steven L. Leeson currently is a professor of poultry science at the University of Guelph (Canada). He received his Ph.D. in poultry nutrition from the University of Nottingham (England). His research areas are feeding programs for leghorn birds, interaction of nutrient supply from feed and body reserves, and energy evaluation of ingredients. Edwin T. Moran, Jr., previously a professor at the University of Guelph (Canada), Moran has been professor of animal nutrition at Auburn University since 1986. He received his Ph.D. in animal nutrition from Washington State University. His research experience includes influence of nutrition and management on broiler yields, amino acid availability and performance, and feedstuff evaluation in broiler production. Carl M. Parsons currently is assistant professor of animal science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his Ph.D. in animal science from Virginia Polytech Institute and State University. Research interests include poultry production and management with emphasis in the field of nutrition, and improved nutritional efficiency for production of poultry meat and eggs, particularly with respect to protein utilization. Jerry L. Sell (Chair) is professor of animal nutrition at Iowa State University, where he has taught since 1976, and from where he received his Ph.D. in poultry nutrition. His major areas of research are energy efficiency of chickens and turkeys, and metabolism of minerals. Park W. Waldroup is professor of poultry nutrition at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. He received his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry from the University of Florida. Among his research interests are studies concerned with nutrient requirements of poultry in terms of nutrient balance and interrelationships of nutrients, and effects of processing on nutritive value of feed.

OCR for page 143