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Biographical Data Steering Committee CHARLES R. O'MELIA is professor of environmental engineering and chairman of the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. He received his B.C.E. (1955) from Manhattan Col- lege and his M.S.E. (1956) and Ph.D. (1963) in sanitary engineering from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Dr. O'Melia was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1989. His research interests are in aquatic chemistry, water and wastewater treatment, and modeling of natural surface and subsurface waters. J. CLARENCE (TERRY) DAVIES is director of the Center for Risk Man- agement at Resources for the Future. His previous positions have included assistant professor of public policy at Princeton University, executive vice president of the Conservation Foundation, and assistant administrator for policy at the Environmental Protection Agency. Most recently, he served as executive director of the National Commission on the Environment. Dr. Davies is a political scientist who, over the past 30 years, has written sev- eral books and numerous articles about environmental policy. ROBERT C. FORNEY is a retired executive vice president, member of the board of directors, and member of the executive committee of E.I. du Font de Nemours & Company. Dr. Forney held positions of increasing responsi- bility in Du Font, including product manager, director of the Products Mar- keting Division, general director of the Marketing Division, and vice presi 263

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264 BIOGRAPHICAL DATA dent and general manager of the Textile Fibers Department. He is a former member of the Board of Governors of the Purdue Foundation and serves as a director on several boards. Dr. Forney received his B.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Purdue University. ROGER O. McCLELLAN, D.V.M., serves as president of the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. A member of the Institute of Medicine, he has previously chaired the Na- tional Research Council (NRC) Committee on Toxicology and concurrently serves as a member of the NRC Committee on Risk Assessment Methodolo- gies for Hazardous Air Pollutants. He is a former chairman of the EPA Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee, is concurrently a member of the EPA Science Advisory Board Executive Committee, and has been a member of numerous other advisory groups in government, academe and private industry. He has a long-standing interest in integrating data from human, laboratory animal, and in vitro studies to assess human risks from exposure to radiation and chemicals. M. GRANGER MORGAN is professor and head of the Department of Engi- neering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests include public policies in which technical issues play a central role and techniques for dealing with uncertainty in quantitative policy analysis. He was educated at Harvard University and received his Ph.D. in applied physics from the University of California at San Diego in 1969. Dr. Morgan has served on a number of committees of the National Research Council and EPA's Science Advisory Board. PAUL R. PORTNEY is vice president and senior fellow at Resources for the Future, an independent, nonpartisan research and educational organization concerned with natural resources and the environment, where he previously was director of its Center for Risk Management. He is also a visiting lecturer at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. In 1979-1980, he served as chief economist at the Council on Environmental Quality in the Executive Office of the President. Dr. Portney received his Ph.D. in economics from Northwestern University and is the author or coauthor of a number of journal articles and books, including Public Policies for Environmental Protection. JOHN H. SEINFELD is the Louis E. Nohl Professor and chairman of the Division of Engineering and Applied Science at the California Institute of Technology. A member of the faculty of Caltech since 1967, he was ap- pointed executive officer for chemical engineering in 1973 and became Louis E. Nohl Professor in 1980. He has been chairman of the Division of Engi -

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BIOGRAPHICAL DATA 265 peering and Applied Science since 1990. Dr. Seinfeld is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His research interests are in the atmospheric chemis- try and physics of air pollution. He received a B.S. from the University of Rochester in 1964 and a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1967, both degrees in chemical engineering. MYRON F. UMAN is assistant executive officer for special projects of the National Research Council (NRC). Concurrently, Dr. Uman is a member of the adjunct faculty of George Mason University and a visiting scholar at the Johns Hopkins University. His Ph.D. is from Princeton University (1968) in electrical engineering and plasms physics. At the NRC since 1973, he has managed or conducted more than 20 formal studies of the application of scientific and technical information to the development and implementation of public policy across a wide range of enviromental issues. Authors WALTER R. BOYNTON received his B.S. in biology from Springfield Col- lege in 1959, M.S. in marine sciences from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1974, and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Florida in 1975. Dr. Boynton's expertise is in estuarine nutri- ent dynamics and seagrass ecology. He has served on a number of advisory boards and committees, including Science Advisory Board, Maryland De- partment of Natural Resources, Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Division, Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee to EPA's Chesa- peake Bay Program, and the Calvert County Environmental Commission. Dr. Boynton is currently a professor at the Chesapeake Biological Labora- tory of the Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies. JAMES D. FINE is an environmental analyst with LSA Associates, Inc. Mr. Fine performs air quality, environmental acoustics, and economic studies related to municipal development and natural resource management issues. Mr. Fine joined LSA after working as an information systems analyst at Anderson Consulting. Mr. Fine holds a B.S. degree in economics from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business (1989~. MICHAEL COUGH is manager of the Biological Applications Program at the Office of Technology Assessment. He received his Ph.D. degree at Brown University in 1966. After a 10-year academic career, including two Fulbright Lectureships, he first joined OTA in 1978. He directed projects in environmental and occupational health in the OTA Health Program and OTA's oversight programs related to Agent Orange and atomic bomb test veterans.

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266 BIOGRAPHICAL DATA Between 1985 and 1990, he was a consultant and director of the Center for Risk Management, Resources for the Future. He is the author of Dioxin, Agent Orange (Plenum, 1986) and coeditor with T.S. Glickman of Readings in Risk (Johns Hopkins, 1990~. JOHN D. GRAHAM is professor of policy and decision sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health, where he teaches the methods of risk analysis and benefit-cost analysis. Dr. Graham is the founding director of the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis, which promotes analytical thinking about societal responses to health, safety, and environmental hazards. He also heads the Harvard Injury Control Center, which promotes science-based interventions to control trauma from both intentional and unintentional causes. He is the author of four books and dozens of scientific articles and serves on the international editorial boards of Risk Analysis and Accident Analysis and Prevention. THOMAS W. HORTON received his bachelor's degree in liberal arts with a concentration in economics from the Johns Hopkins University in 1968. He is a writer and a naturalist. From 1972 to 1987, Mr. Horton was a reporter for the Baltimore Sun, specializing in environmental topics. He has re- ceived regional and national awards for environmental coverage of Chesa- peake Bay. In 1987 he published Bay Country, a collection of essays that won the 1988 John Burroughs Medal of the Museum of Natural History in New York. In 1988 Mr. Horton wrote Turning the Tide, the first comprehen- sive assessment of the state of the Chesapeake Bay. His most recent book on the Chesapeake, Waters Way, was published in 1992. Currently Mr. Horton writes a weekly column on "Environment" for the Baltimore Sun and is working on another book. JASON E. JOHNSTON is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology, where he studied in the Technology and Public Policy Program and the Department of Chemical Engineering. Mr. Johnston is currently a staff specialist with Karch and Associates, Inc., a scientific consulting firm spe- cializing in toxicology, epidemiology, and risk assessment. Mr. Johnston has experience in evaluating exposures to, and the associated health risks of, toxic substances in industrial settings and at hazardous waste sites. He has also performed analyses of environmental data and information in the environmental policy, regulatory compliance and litigation arenas. RENATE D. KIMBROUGH is senior medical associate at the Institute for Evaluating Health Risks. She is a doctor of medicine with training in pathology, diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology, and fellow of the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology. Dr. Kimbrough conducted

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BIOGRAPHICAL DATA 267 research in toxicology and environmental health at the Centers for Disease Control for 27 years before being appointed adviser to the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for Medical Toxicology and Risk Evaluation in 1989. She joined IEHR in 1991. THOMAS C. MALONE received his B.A. in zoology from Colorado Col- lege in 1965, M.S. in oceanography from the University of Hawaii in 1967, and Ph.D. in biology from Stanford University in 1971. Dr. Malone's ex- pertise is in plankton dynamics and the processes of eutrophication in coastal ecosystems. He has served on a number of advisory boards and commit- tees, including the executive board of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee to EPA's Chesapeake Research Consortium, and vice chair of the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System Advisory Coun- cil. Dr. Malone is the director of the Horn Point Environmental Laboratory of the Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies and of the Multiscale Experimental Ecosystem Research Center, an EPA Center for Exploratory Environmental Research. JOHN A. MOORE is president and chief executive officer of the Institute for Evaluating Health Risks (IEHR). IEHR is established as a nonprofit institution to serve government, industry and the public on issues that ad- dress the health risk of chemicals. Before joining IEHR, Dr. Moore was assistant administrator of the Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He came to EPA from the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, where he was both director for toxicology research and testing and deputy director of the Na- tional Toxicology Program. Dr. Moore received a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Michigan State University in 1963; he is also certi- fied by the American Board of Toxicology. RICHARD D. MORGENSTERN holds a Ph.D. in economics from the Uni- versity of Michigan (1970~. He was a tenured associate professor of eco- nomics at Queens College of the City University of New York before be- coming the deputy assistant director for energy, the environment, and natural resources at the Congressional Budget Office in 1977. Subsequently, he served as legislative assistant to Senator J. Bennett Johnston (1979-1980) and then the director of the Energy Program of the Urban Institute. Since 1982, he has been director of the Office of Policy Analysis of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. While at EPA, he has served as acting assistant administrator for policy, planning, and evaluation (1991-1993) and as deputy administrator during the transition period at the beginning of the Clinton administration. -

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268 BIOGRAPHICAL DATA SUELLEN WERNER PIRAGES received her Ph.D. at Stanford University. Pier area of expertise is biological sciences, with emphasis on environmen- tal toxicology and genetics. Dr. Pirages was a senior staff officer in the Environmental Studies Board of the National Research Council during 1977 to 1890. She then served as a senior analyst in the Industry, Technology, and Employment Program of the U.S. congressional Office of Technology Assessment. From 1984 to l99O, Dr. Pirages was managing director for environmental policy and director of hazardous waste programs for the Na- tional Solid Waste Management Association. Currently, Dr. Pirages is ex- ecutive director at Karch & Associates, Inc., a scientific consulting firm specializing in toxicological and epidemiological evaluations, regulatory and legislative policy analyses, and risk assessment applications. SUSAN W. PUTNAM is a research associate in environmental policy at the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis. She received her doctoral degree from the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health in 1991. Since joining the Center for Risk Analysis, Dr. Putnam has continued her doctoral research exploring the role of scientific advisory groups in public health policymaking and has examined the risks and benefits of chlorinated drinking water. JAMES L. REGENS is Freeport-McMoRan Professor of Environmental Policy at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. While with the U.S. Envi- ronmental Protection Agency from 1980 to 1983, Dr. Regens chaired the Group on Energy and Environment of the Organization for Economic Coop- eration and Development from 1981 to 1983 and was EPA Joint Chair of the National Acid Precipitation Program from 1981 to 1982. He is vice-chair- man of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board. PHILIP M. ROTH is a principal of Envair, an unincorporated association dedicated to carrying out contract research and offering consulting services in the environmental and earth sciences. Dr. Roth has been an independent consultant in environmental science and policy since 1983. He was vice president of Systems Applications, Inc., served as a member of the board of directors, and was technical director and director of environmental studies during the period from 1969 to 1983. Dr. Roth holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D., also in chemical engineering, from Princeton University. PHILIP C. SINGER is a professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he is also director of the Water Resources Engineering Program. He has conducted research on the chemical aspects of water and wastewater treatment for the past 28 years, for the past 17 years focusing on the forma -

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BIOGRAPHICAL DATA 269 lion and control of disinfection by-products in drinking water. Dr. Singer is a past chairman of the Research Division of the American Water Works Asso- ciation. He is currently on the editorial board of the journal Ozone Science and Engineering- and was formerly an associate editor of Environmental Science and Technology. He is also a member of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. His S.M. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental sciences and engineering are from Harvard University. COURT STEVENSON received his B.S. in biology from Brooklyn College of the City University of New York in 1966 and his Ph.D. in 1972 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He began research in wetlands at the University of Maryland at College Park in 1972 where he was among the first to recognize the massive decline of submersed aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay and link it to nutrient loadings from the surrounding water- shed. His current research interests include diffuse source inputs at the land-sea interface to seagrass ecology in tropical lagoons, as well as in the impacts of sea-level on coastal systems throughout the world. ROBERT M. WHITE is president of the National Academy of Engineering and vice chairman of the National Research Council, the principal operating agency of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. White has had a distinguished career in environmental science and engineering. He established one of the first corporations de- voted to environmental science and services. He served in the government under five Presidents, from 1963 to 1977, first as chief of the U.S. Weather Bureau, and finally as the first administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Prior to his election as president of the NAE, Dr. White was president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. He holds a B.A. degree in geology from Harvard University and M.S. and Sc.D. degrees in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. STEPHEN D. ZIMAN is a staff scientist in the Air Issues and Technology Team, Environmental Group, at Chevron Research and Technology Com- pany. His principal responsibilities are in technical and regulatory areas of air quality planning at the federal and state levels. Dr. Ziman has worked as a research scientist with Chevron Chemical Company and for Chevron USA Environmental Affairs and Chevron Production prior to his present position. He was an American Chemical Society Congressional Science Fellow dur- ing 1979-1980, and worked as a staff member for the U.S. House of Repre- sentatives Subcommittee on Science, Research, and Technology. Dr. Ziman received his B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1967 and his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Wisconsin in 1971.