B

Contributors

Biographical Sketches

ROBERT J. HAGGERTY (Chair) is Professor of Pediatrics Emeritus, at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and formerly the president of the William T. Grant Foundation. He is a pediatrician; a graduate of Cornell University and its Medical College; Editor of Pediatrics in Review, the continuing education journal of The American Academy of Pediatrics, as well as a past president of that organization; Editor-in-Chief of The Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine: A Journal of Urban Health; and Executive Director of the International Pediatrics Association. He is a member of numerous professional societies, including The American Pediatric Society, The Board of Overseers for the Social Sciences at Tufts University, Board of Visitors of the School of Public Health at Oklahoma University, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has been Co-editor of Pediatrics, Associate Editor of The New England Journal of Medicine, and Chairman of the Health Services Research Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research. He received the Martha Eliot Award in Maternal and Child Health from the American Public Health Association; the Clifford C. Grulee Award, the Dale Richmond Award, and the Andrew Aldrich Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics; the Joseph St. Geme Award for the Future of Pediatrics from the American Pediatric Society; and the Gustav Leinhard Award for contributions to health services from the Institute of Medicine. He chaired the Mayor's Committee on Maternal and Child Health



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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH B Contributors Biographical Sketches ROBERT J. HAGGERTY (Chair) is Professor of Pediatrics Emeritus, at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and formerly the president of the William T. Grant Foundation. He is a pediatrician; a graduate of Cornell University and its Medical College; Editor of Pediatrics in Review, the continuing education journal of The American Academy of Pediatrics, as well as a past president of that organization; Editor-in-Chief of The Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine: A Journal of Urban Health; and Executive Director of the International Pediatrics Association. He is a member of numerous professional societies, including The American Pediatric Society, The Board of Overseers for the Social Sciences at Tufts University, Board of Visitors of the School of Public Health at Oklahoma University, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has been Co-editor of Pediatrics, Associate Editor of The New England Journal of Medicine, and Chairman of the Health Services Research Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research. He received the Martha Eliot Award in Maternal and Child Health from the American Public Health Association; the Clifford C. Grulee Award, the Dale Richmond Award, and the Andrew Aldrich Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics; the Joseph St. Geme Award for the Future of Pediatrics from the American Pediatric Society; and the Gustav Leinhard Award for contributions to health services from the Institute of Medicine. He chaired the Mayor's Committee on Maternal and Child Health

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH (New York City) and the Subcommittee on Adolescents and AIDS of the Governor's Commission on AIDS (New York). He has been a member of the New York State Council of Graduate Medical Education, the Carnegie Council on Children, the Board of Alliance for Health Care for All, and the MacArthur Foundation Committee on Successful Adolescence. His initial faculty experiences were at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital Medical Center of Boston, where he developed a training and research program in general family pediatrics. There his interest in the effects of psychosocial stress as a cause of many children's illnesses began. His next career position was at the University of Rochester's School of Medicine and Dentistry, where he was Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics. In Rochester, he and his colleagues developed community-based health services for children, and coined the phrase “the new morbidity” for the psychosocial problems of children. He then returned to Boston, where he was the Roger I. Lee Professor of Health Services at The Harvard School of Public Health and Chairman of the Department of Health Services (a department that included maternal and child health, behavioral sciences, and health services administration). He is author of more than 120 original papers, editor or author of three books, one of which is now in its fourth edition (Ambulatory Pediatrics), and author of nearly 200 book chapters, editorials, and abstracts. He has been Visiting Professor and/or named lecturer at over 50 institutions. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and was formerly a member of its council. BEATRIX A. HAMBURG (Vice-Chair) is the President of the William T. Grant Foundation and is Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, where she was formerly Director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. She received her A.B. from Vassar College and her M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine. Her prior professional appointments were at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School in their respective Departments of Psychiatry. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and is a member of the IOM Board on Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders. She was a member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (CBASSE) of the National Research Council. In New York State she is a member of The Public Health Council of the Department of Health; a member of the Governor's Task Force on Life and Law; and a member of the New York State Council on Graduate Medical Education. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and a former member of the Board of Directors of the AAAS. She has served on study sections

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH and ad hoc review panels for NIMH and is currently a member of the National Advisory Mental Health Council. She is a member of numerous professional societies, including the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the Society for Adolescent Research, the Society for Research in Child Development, The American Public Health Association, the Society for Adolescent Medicine, and the Royal Society of Medicine. Her research has been in normal adolescent development, adolescent psychopathology, and endocrine-behavior interactions. She is most noted for her studies of early adolescence, her pioneering work on peer counseling, and studies of diabetic children and adolescents. She is the author of many books and papers on these topics. She has received many honors and awards, including Phi Beta Kappa, the Brownell Prize, the T. Ross Gallagher Award, and the ADAMHA Administrators ' Award for Outstanding Achievement. She currently serves on the boards of the Bush Foundation, the Revson Foundation, and the Greenwall Foundation. She is a member of the Committee on Successful Adolescence of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and a member of the Carnegie Council on Adolescence. WILLIAM R. BEARDSLEE is the Clinical Director and Vice Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at Children's Hospital in Boston, and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He received his B.A. from Haverford College and his M.D. from Case Western Reserve University. He trained in general psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and in child psychiatry and psychiatric research at the Children 's Hospital in Boston. He has a longstanding research interest in the development of children at risk because of severe parental mental illness. He has been especially interested in the protective effects of self-understanding in enabling youngsters and adults to cope with adversity and has studied self-understanding in civil rights workers, survivors of cancer, and children of parents with mood disorders. He has received the Blanche F. Ittleson Award of the American Psychiatric Association for outstanding published research contributing to the mental health of children and has been a faculty scholar of the William T. Grant Foundation. Currently, he directs the Preventive Intervention Project at Judge Baker Children's Center, an NIMH-funded study to explore the effects of a clinician-centered, family-based preventive intervention designed to enhance resiliency and family understanding for children of parents with mood disorder. He has served on the NIMH's Life Course and Prevention Research Committee, Subcommittee on Child and Family Prevention, and is active with numerous professional organizations, for both research and advocacy for children.

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH ROLAND D. CIARANELLO is Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University Medical Center. He is Director of the Nancy Friend Pritzker Laboratory of Developmental and Molecular Neurobiology and Director of the Division of Child Psychiatry and Child Development. He received his B.S. from Union College and his M.D. from Stanford University. He has been the recipient of Research Scientist Development Awards and Research Scientist Awards since 1978 and the John Merck Fund Award for Research in Autism since 1982. He received the Daniel H. Efron Research Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and the Distinguished Mentor Award from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. He has served on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Medical Genetics, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, Pediatric Psychopharmacology, and Psychiatric Genetics, and he is Co-editor-in-Chief of Neuropsychopharmacology. He has also served on the Council of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology as well as on NIMH's Extramural Science Advisory Board, Basic Psychopharmacology and Neuropsychology Research Review Committee, and Mental Health Special Projects Review Committee. He is author of over 140 scientific papers and book chapters. JOSEPH T. COYLE is the Eben S. Draper Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience and Chair of the Consolidated Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He received his A.B. from the College of the Holy Cross and his M.D. from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. After an internship in pediatrics at The Johns Hopkins University Hospital, he spent three years as a research fellow with Julius Axelrod at NIMH. He completed his residency training in psychiatry at The Johns Hopkins University Hospital, where he then served as Distinguished Service Professor and Director of the Division of Child Psychiatry until 1991. His research contributions have been recognized by the reception of the John Jacob Abel Award from the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, the Gold Medal Award from the Society for Biological Psychiatry, the Foundation Fund Research Award from the American Psychiatric Association, and the McAlpin Award from the National Mental Health Association. His research interests include developmental neurobiology, mechanisms of neuronal vulnerability, and psychopharmacology, and he has published over 400 scientific articles. He is currently a member of the Institute of Medicine and the Institute of Medicine's Board on Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders. He serves on the

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH Advisory Board for NIMH, and is past president of the Society for Neuroscience. WILLIAM W. EATON is Professor in the Department of Mental Hygiene, School of Hygiene and Public Health at The Johns Hopkins University Hospital. He received his B.A. from Wesleyan University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was Staff Investigator at the Institute of Community and Family Psychiatry at Jewish General Hospital in Montreal and Assistant Chief of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies at NIMH. He has membership in various professional societies, including the American Sociological Association, the Society for Epidemiologic Research, the American Public Health Association, and the American Psychopathologic Association. His major research interests are in the epidemiology of schizophrenia, the sociology of mental disorders, and the quantitative approaches to understanding social life. His research and publications have also included studies of migration and ethnic relations, anxiety disorders, occupations and psychopathology, incidence of mental disorders, and analysis of longitudinal data on psychopathology. J. DAVID HAWKINS is Professor of Social Work and Director of the Social Development Research Group at the School of Social Work, University of Washington in Seattle. He received his B.A. from Stanford University and his M.A. and his Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University. His research focuses on understanding and preventing child and adolescent health and behavior problems by seeking to identify risk and protective factors, discovering how these factors interact, and testing comprehensive prevention strategies which seek to reduce risk through the enhancement of protective factors in families, schools, peer groups, and communities. Since 1981, he has been conducting the Seattle Social Development Project, a longitudinal prevention study testing a risk reduction strategy based on his theoretical work. His prevention work has recently been published in the book Communities That Care. He has served as a member of the National Institute on Drug Abuse 's Epidemiology, Prevention, and Services Research Review Committee and on the former Office for Substance Abuse Prevention's National Advisory Committee, and as a member of the National Education Goals Panel Resource Group. He is a member of the American Sociological Association, the American Society of Criminology, the Council on Social Work Education, and the National Association of Social Workers. He has authored over 70 publications.

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH FRITZ A. HENN is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Director of the Institute for Mental Health Research. He is responsible for a network of mental health services covering eastern Long Island. Before his current position, Dr. Henn was Professor of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. He received his B.A. from Wesleyn University, his Ph.D. from The Johns Hopkins University, was a visiting scientist at the Institute of Neurobiology at the University of Goteborg, Sweden, and received his M.D. from the University of Virginia. He has held several appointments to federal advisory committees and has membership in many professional societies, including the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the American Psychiatric Association, the Society for Neuroscience, and the Society for Biological Psychiatry. He is a past president of the Winter Conference on Brain Research. He is on the scientific board of the Anika Monica Foundation and Dalheim Workshops and has also served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Neurochemistry, the Archives of General Psychiatry, and the Journal of Schizophrenia Research. He has authored over 100 publications. ROBERT P. LIBERMAN is Professor of Psychiatry at UCLA School of Medicine, where he directs the NIMH-funded Clinical Research Center for Schizophrenia and Psychiatric Rehabilitation. He developed the Social and Independent Living Skills Program at the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center, which has produced, validated, and disseminated modules for training and rehabilitating persons with serious and disabling mental disorders. The modules have been translated into Japanese, French, German, and seven other languages and have been recognized with Significant Achievement Awards from the American Psychiatric Association and the World Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. He has directed the Camarillo/UCLA Clinical Research Unit at Camarillo State Hospital since 1970, where biobehavioral treatments for refractory schizophrenia have been designed and experimentally evaluated. The Camarillo/UCLA Research Center received the Exemplary Award for State-University Collaboration by the American Psychiatric Association in 1991. He received his A.B. from Dartmouth College, where he also attended medical school. He received his M.D. from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and his M.S. in pharmacology from the University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco. He is on the Executive Council of the Association for Clinical Psychosocial Research and has served on the Board of Directors of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy and

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH the American Association of Community Psychiatrists. He has been the recipient of the Silvano Arieti Award for Schizophrenia Research from the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, the Samuel Hibbs Award for innovations in treatment from the American Psychiatric Association, the Van Ameringen Award for Psychiatric Rehabilitation from the American Psychiatric Association, and the Howard Davis Award from the Society for Knowledge Utilization and Planned Change. His research team is guided by a heuristic conceptual framework based upon vulnerability, stress, and protective factors that determine the etiology, course, and treatment outcome of schizophrenia and other major mental disorders. Among his more than 300 publications are the books Psychiatric Rehabilitation of Chronic Mental Patients and Social Skills Training for Psychiatric Patients. BEVERLY B. LONG is President-Elect of the World Federation for Mental Health, an international nongovernmental organization in consultative status to the United Nations and its specialized agencies. Previously, she has been president of the Atlanta, the Georgia, and the National Mental Health Associations. She received her B.S. and her M.S. in psychology from the University of Georgia and her M.S. in public health from the University of North Carolina. She served as a member of President Carter's Commission on Mental Health. From 1984 to 1986, she chaired a National Commission on the Prevention of Mental-Emotional Disabilities, and in 1987 she founded and chaired the National Prevention Coalition, both under the auspices of the National Mental Health Association. She is a member of the NIMH Prevention Research Steering Committee, and she chairs the World Federation's International Committee for Primary Prevention. Her interest is in attaining government policies and action that recognize the interface of health and mental health and that strive toward a balanced research and service agenda for mental health that includes prevention of disorder, promotion of health, and effective treatment for those who are disordered. SPERO M. MANSON is Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and Director of the National Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, also located at the University of Colorado. He received his Ph.D. in medical anthropology from the University of Minnesota in 1978. From 1978 to 1986, he was a member of the Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland. In 1986, he left Oregon to join the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center faculty, where he assumed his present position. He has served on numerous boards of

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH directors, including those of the Denver Community Mental Health Commission and the State of Oregon Governor's Commission on Alcohol and Drugs. He spent four years as a member of the NIMH's Epidemiology Research Review Committee and is nearing the end of a four-year term on the NIMH's Services Research Review Committee. His professional interests encompass psychiatric epidemiology, mental health services research, and cross-cultural psychiatry, with special emphasis on depression, anxiety, suicide, and substance abuse/ dependence across the developmental life span. He has published extensively and has been supported by funds from federal research grants, contracts, state/tribal research grants, and private foundation grants. He is currently a member of the Institute of Medicine's Board on Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders. DAVID MECHANIC is the Rene Dubos Professor of Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research at Rutgers University. He received his B.A. from City College of New York, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. He served on the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics of the Department of Health and Human Services and is a member of the Health Advisory Board of the General Accounting Office. He chaired the NIMH's Advisory Group on Research Resources in Mental Health Services Research and has had numerous other government assignments. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. He has served on numerous committees for these National Research Council organizations. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received the Distinguished Investigator Award from the Association for Health Services Research, and the first Carl Taube Award of the American Public Health Association. He has served as a consultant to numerous nonprofit organizations. He has written or edited 23 books and more than 250 research articles, chapters, and other publications in the fields of medical sociology, health policy, health services research, and social and behavioral sciences. RICARDO F. MUÑOZ is Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where he serves as Director of the Clinical Psychology Training Program and Chief Psychologist at UCSF's San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) campus. He earned his A.B. from Stanford and his Ph.D. from the University of Oregon. His research program is focused on the development and evaluation of linguistically and culturally appropriate

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH screening, prevention, and treatment approaches to major depression, using a social learning orientation and cognitive-behavioral self-control approaches. He was founding Director of the SFGH Depression Clinic and the Depression Prevention Research Project, which has received an honorable mention for the Lela Rowland Prevention Award of the National Mental Health Association. He is a recipient of the Health Promotion Award from the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Services Organization and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Award from UCSF. He is a member of the National Hispanic Psychological Association, the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the American Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Community Mental Health Journal, and the Revista Interamericana de Psicologia. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine's Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He has published many articles and chapters, and five books, including Depression Prevention: Research Directions and The Prevention of Depression: Research and Practice (with Y.W. Ying). HERBERT W. NICKENS is the first Vice-President of Minority Health, Education, and Prevention at the Association of American Medical Colleges. He received his A.B. from Harvard College and an M.D. and M.A. (in sociology) from the University of Pennsylvania. He is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He has held positions as the first Director of the Office of Minority Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Director of the Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis at the National Institute on Aging; and Deputy Chief, Center on Aging at NIMH. He is a member of the National Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, Black Psychiatrists of America, the Board of Directors of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatrists, the Task Force on Minority Aging of the Gerontological Society of America, and the Board of Trustees of the Scientists' Institute for Public Information. He also serves as a consultant to the Council on Aging of the American Psychiatric Association. He has written numerous articles, and has lectured frequently on geriatrics, minority health, and AIDS. RICHARD H. PRICE is Professor of Psychology and Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. He is also Director of the Michigan Prevention Research Center, which focuses on the impact of working life on mental

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH health. He is also chair of the Organizational Psychology Program at the University of Michigan. He received his A.B. from Lawrence College, and his A.M. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana. He has served as an advisor to NIMH, National Institute on Drug Abuse, the former Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and serves as a member of the board of directors of the William T. Grant Foundation. He is chair of the NIMH Prevention Research Steering Committee. He is a recipient of the Lela Rowland Prevention Award from the National Mental Health Association, and the Distinguished Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the American Orthopsychiatric Association. He is the author or editor of a number of books and articles on mental health and prevention, including Fourteen Ounces of Prevention: A Casebook for Practitioners and Prevention in Mental Health: Research, Policy, & Practice. NAOMI RAE GRANT is Professor and Head of the Division of Child Psychiatry and Professor of Pediatrics at The University of Western Ontario. She is also the Director of Treatment, Training, and Research at Child and Parent Resource Institute (CPRI). She received her medical and psychiatric education at the University of London (England), and has had extensive clinical experience in Canada and the United States. She came to Canada to head the Children's Services Branch of the Mental Health Division of the Ministry of Health. She has held senior positions in child psychiatry in London and Hamilton, and she was Clinical Director of the Child and Family Centre at Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals in Hamilton. She has held academic appointments at Washington University, University of Maryland, University of Toronto, and McMaster University. From 1986 to 1987, she was Chairman of the Association of Agencies for Treatment and Development in Hamilton. She is past president of the London Coordination Council for Children and Youth. She was formerly a member of the Premier's Council on Health Strategies, and of the Board of the Canadian Academy of Child Psychiatry. She is currently a member of the Board of the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, for which she also serves as Chairman of the Committee on Preventive Psychiatry. Her areas of special interest and research are prevention and the promotion of mental health in children and adolescents. PATRICIA J. MRAZEK is Senior Program Officer and Study Director in the Institute of Medicine's Division of Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH Disorders. She obtained her M.S.W. in social work from Smith College and her Ph.D. in family development from Union Graduate School. She was a Sheldon Fellow in the Advanced Family Therapy Program at the Tavistock Clinic in London, England. For many years she worked with C. Henry Kempe as the Assistant Director of the National Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Her interests and publications have focused on child maltreatment and the prevention of asthma in young children. She recently became the Executive Director of the Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research in Washington, D.C. CAROLYN E. PETERS is Research Assistant for the Committee on Prevention of Mental Disorders. Her previous experience at the Institute of Medicine involved work in the Division of Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders and on the AIDS Roundtable. She received her B.A. in English from Dickinson College. CAROL M. HOSPENTHAL serves as Project Assistant for the Committee on the Prevention of Mental Disorders. Before joining the Institute of Medicine, she received her B.A. from Davenport College of Business and worked as Administrative Assistant for the Lions Clubs of Michigan State Office. ROSEANNE PRICE received her B.A. degree in American literature and experimental psychology from Rockford College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. She received her scientific editorial training at the American Geophysical Union in Washington, D.C. From 1978 to 1990, she served as Staff Editor for various units of the National Academy of Sciences, most recently as the Director of the Editorial Office of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources of the National Research Council. Since 1990, she has worked independently as an editor and writer for a number of scientific organizations. Acknowledgments Ron Abeles, National Institute on Aging Naleen Andrade, University of Hawaii Virginia Anthony, American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Joan Asarnow, University of California, Los Angeles Cheryl Austein, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, DHHS Mohamet Badawi, The Johns Hopkins University

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH Jack Barchas, Cornell University Medical College Kathryn Barnard, University of Washington Heather Barton, National Mental Health Association Rhoda Baruch, The Institute for Mental Health Initiatives Leila Beckwith, University of California, Los Angeles Myron Belfer, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Richard Bonnie, University of Virginia Gail Boyd, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Lester Breslow, University of California, Los Angeles William Bukoski, National Institute on Drug Abuse William Bunney, University of California, Irvine Thomas Burroughs, Consultant, Durham, NC William Carpenter, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center Wendy Chavkin, Columbia University Dante Cicchetti, University of Rochester John Cole, Duke University James Cromwell, National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Cal Crutchfield, National Association of Prevention Professionals and Advocates Robert Czeh, National Institute of Mental Health Patrick DeLeon, Senator Inouye's Office Norman Dinges, University of Alaska, Fairbanks Carl Dunst, Western Carolina Center, Morganton, NC Felton Earls, Harvard Medical School Byron Egeland, University of Minnesota Leona Eggert, University of Washington Leon Eisenberg, Harvard Medical School John Farquhar, Stanford University Stephen Fawcett, University of Kansas Manning Feinleib, National Center for Health Statistics Tiffany Field, University of Miami Medical School Michael Fishman, Maternal and Child Health Bureau Laurie Flynn, National Alliance for the Mentally Ill L. Patt Franciosi, National Prevention Coalition Vincent Francisco, University of Kansas Loretta Fuddy, Hawaii State Department of Health Ronald Gallimore, University of California, Los Angeles Helen Gee, Consultant, Washington, DC Miriam Gersfield, National Institutes of Health Shirley Glynn, West Los Angeles VA Medical Center Thomas Glynn, National Cancer Institute Frederick Goodwin, National Institute of Mental Health

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH Irving Gottesman, University of Virginia Mark Greenberg, University of Washington Bernard Guyer, The Johns Hopkins University Barbara Haight, Medical University of South Carolina Laura Hall, Office of Technology Assessment William Hansen, Bowman Gray School of Medicine James Harrell, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, DHHS Nancy Henkin, Temple University James Herbert, Medical College of Pennsylvania at EPPI Ralph Hingson, Boston University Harold Holder, Prevention Research Center, Berkeley, CA Wade Horn, Administration for Children, Youth and Families Jan Howard, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Mary Jansen, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Leonard Jason, DePaul University Peter Jensen, National Institute of Mental Health Dale Johnson, University of Houston Marshall Jones, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center John Kalberer, National Institutes of Health Robert Katzman, University of California, San Diego Sheppard Kellam, The Johns Hopkins University Edward Kelty, National Institute of Mental Health Zaven Khatchaturian, National Institute on Aging Ruth Knee, American Orthopsychiatric Association Robert Koegel, University of California, Santa Barbara Doreen Spilton Koretz, National Institute of Mental Health Helena Chmura Kraemer, Stanford University Leonard Lash, National Institute of Mental Health James Leckman, Yale University Alan Leshner, National Institute of Mental Health Vicki Levin, National Institute of Mental Health Peter Lewinsohn, University of Oregon Rhonda Lewis, University of Kansas Alicia Lieberman, San Francisco General Hospital Maurey Lieberman, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Marsha Liss, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect Kenneth Lutterman, National Institute of Mental Health Harriet MacMillan, McMaster University Beryce MacLennan, Private practice, Washington, DC Wallace Mandell, The Johns Hopkins University Ann Maney, National Institute of Mental Health

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH Katie Maslow, Office of Technology Assessment Neil Mazer, Hawaii State Department of Health Sandy McElhaney, National Mental Health Association Dan McFerran, Department of Defense Roger Meyer, University of Connecticut Jim Mintz, University of California, Los Angeles Leonard Mitnick, National Institute of Mental Health Terrie Moffitt, University of Wisconsin, Madison Bill Mollerstrom, Department of Defense John Morgan, Chesterfield Community Services Board, Chesterfield, VA Eve Moscicki, National Institute of Mental Health Marilyn Moses, National Institute of Justice Joseph Mottola, Administration for Children, Youth and Families David Mrazek, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC Peter Muehrer, National Institute of Mental Health Kim Mueser, Medical College of Pennsylvania at EPPI Holly Neckerman, Harborview Injury Prevention Research Center, Seattle, WA Harold Neighbors, University of Michigan Godfrey Oakley, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Dan Offord, Chedoke-McMaster Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario Adrienne Paine, University of Kansas Paula Panzer, Columbia University Delores Parron, National Institute of Mental Health David Pauls, Yale University Roseanne Price, Consultant, Silver Spring, MD Juan Ramos, National Institute of Mental Health John Reid, Oregon Social Learning Center David Reiss, George Washington University Medical Center Dorothy Rice, University of California, San Francisco Kimber Richter, University of Kansas Henry Riecken, University of Pennsylvania John Romano, University of Rochester William Roper, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mark Rosenberg, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Jack Rothman, University of California, Los Angeles Michael Rutter, Institute of Psychiatry, London, England Irwin Sandler, Arizona State University James Schlie, Department of Defense Marc Schuckitt, University of California, San Diego Myrna Shure, Hahnemann University Lonnie Snowden, University of California, Berkeley

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REDUCING RISKS FOR Mental Disorders: FRONTIERS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION RESEARCH Ruth Stein, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Barbara Strane, Institute of Social Research Joseph Strayhorn, Allegheny General Hospital, PA Frank Sullivan, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Ruby Takinishi, Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development Stephen Teret, The Johns Hopkins Injury Prevention Center E. Fuller Torrey, St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington, DC Edward Trickett, University of Maryland William Vega, University of California, Berkeley Alexander Wagenaar, University of Minnesota Joseph Webb, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Roger Weissberg, University of Illinois at Chicago Myrna Weissman, Columbia University Valerie Welsh, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, DHHS Peter Whitehouse, Case Western Reserve University Susan Wolf, Harvard University Stuart Youngner, University Hospitals of Cleveland Institute of Medicine and National Research Council Staff: Laura Baird Enriqueta Bond Claudia Carl Rosemary Chalk Robert Cook-Deegan Molla Donaldson Michael Edington Gary Ellis Michael Lai Constance Pechura Kenneth Shine Gail Spears Nina Spruill Susanne Stoiber Mike Stoto Betsy Turvene Audrey Ward Karl Yordy NOTE: Individuals are listed with the affiliations they had at the time they contributed to the report.

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