Appendix D
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

Harold Fallon, M.D. (Chairman), is a graduate of Yale College and Yale Medical School. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of North Carolina and did additional fellowship training at Yale University Department of Medicine and Duke University Department of Biochemistry. He joined the University of North Carolina in 1963 and left as Professor and Vice-Chairman of the Department of Medicine to assume the position of William Branch Porter Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine and Professor of Pharmacology at the Medical College of Virginia in 1973. His area of special research and clinical interests concerns liver disease. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, former President of the American Association of Physicians, former Chairman of the Board of Internal Medicine, Regent of the American College of Physicians, and former President of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease. In February 1993, he assumed the position of Professor of Medicine and Dean of the University of Alabama School of Medicine.

David Tollerud, M.D., M.P.H. (Vice-chairman), is Director of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. He received his M.D. from Mayo Medical School and his M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. He served as a Medical Staff Fellow in the Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute; Pulmonary Fellow at Brigham and Women's and Beth Israel Hospitals in Boston;



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 764
Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam Appendix D Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES Harold Fallon, M.D. (Chairman), is a graduate of Yale College and Yale Medical School. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of North Carolina and did additional fellowship training at Yale University Department of Medicine and Duke University Department of Biochemistry. He joined the University of North Carolina in 1963 and left as Professor and Vice-Chairman of the Department of Medicine to assume the position of William Branch Porter Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine and Professor of Pharmacology at the Medical College of Virginia in 1973. His area of special research and clinical interests concerns liver disease. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, former President of the American Association of Physicians, former Chairman of the Board of Internal Medicine, Regent of the American College of Physicians, and former President of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease. In February 1993, he assumed the position of Professor of Medicine and Dean of the University of Alabama School of Medicine. David Tollerud, M.D., M.P.H. (Vice-chairman), is Director of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. He received his M.D. from Mayo Medical School and his M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. He served as a Medical Staff Fellow in the Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute; Pulmonary Fellow at Brigham and Women's and Beth Israel Hospitals in Boston;

OCR for page 764
Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati; and Associate Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. He is a Fellow of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and the American College of Chest Physicians, a member of numerous professional societies, including the American Thoracic Society, the American Association of Immunologists, the Clinical Immunology Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of the American Industrial Hygiene Association. Norman Breslow, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, and committee liaison to the IOM Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. A former staff member of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), he is co-author (with Dr. N.E. Day) of two influential IARC scientific publications on the design and analysis of case-control and cohort studies in cancer epidemiology. Dr. Breslow's research interests are in statistical methods for survival and categorical data and in the treatment and epidemiology of childhood cancer, particularly Wilms tumor. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Statistical Association and is a Member of the International Statistical Institute and the Institute of Medicine. Jesse Berlin, Sc.D., is Research Assistant Professor of Biostatistics in Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, where he has been since 1989. He received his doctorate in biostatistics from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1988. He has participated in both the design and analysis of a wide variety of clinical and epidemiologic investigations. Dr. Berlin's principal research interest lies in the area of meta-analysis, the quantitative analysis of results of multiple studies for the purpose of integrating the findings. He has become nationally recognized in that field and has applied his experience to developing the application of meta-analysis to epidemiologic studies. Dr. Berlin also serves as an Associate Editor for Methodology for the recently initiated Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Karen Bolla, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Health, the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. She is currently the Director of Neuropsychology at the Francis Scott Key Medical Institution, a Johns Hopkins Medical Institution.

OCR for page 764
Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam Graham Colditz, M.D., Dr.P.H., is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. He has extensive experience in the epidemiology of life-style and health, having worked on the Nurses' Health Study since 1982. He currently is Principal Investigator on general studies based on the Nurses' Health Study. These include studies of screening and mortality; benign breast disease and risk of breast cancer; and diet, activity, and risk of fractures in women. He has published studies on a range of chronic conditions that affect women including heart disease, breast and other cancers, fractures, gall stones, and obesity. Christopher Goetz, M.D., is Professor of Neurological Sciences, Director of the Section of Movement Disorders, and Associate Chairman of the Department of Neurological Sciences at Rush University/Rush Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago. His primary research interests are extrapyramidal neurology and neurotoxicologic models of movement disorders. He has written textbooks and articles on movement disorder neurology, neuropharmacology, and clinical neurotoxicology. He has served on the medical advisory boards of the United Parkinson Foundation, the Tourette Syndrome Association, and the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation, and was a Fulbright Scholar at the College de France, Paris, for studies of serotonin pharmacology in the central nervous system. He is the associate editor of Clinical Neuropharmacology and a member of the international editorial board of Movement Disorders. Norbert E. Kaminski, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, with a joint appointment in the Department of Pathology, at Michigan State University where he has been a faculty member since 1993. Dr. Kaminski received his M.S. in Toxicology in 1981 and his Ph.D. in Toxicology and Physiology in 1985, both from North Carolina State University. After completing his graduate training, he joined the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Medical College of Virginia as a postdoctoral fellow in 1985. During 1987-1988, Dr. Kaminski held the rank of Research Instructor, and in 1989 he was appointed to Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Medical College of Virginia where he served until 1993. Dr. Kaminski's research is in the area of immunopharmacology and immunotoxicology. One of the primary research focuses of his laboratory is investigating the mechanisms of immunotoxicity associated with chlorinated hydrocarbons including liver-immune interactions. Dr. Kaminski has served as a member of the Environmental Protection Agency Science Review Panel for Health Research and is a member of the Society of Toxicology. David Kriebel, Sc.D., received his doctorate in occupational epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1986. After postdoctoral work

OCR for page 764
Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam at Harvard, the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, and the Center for the Study and Prevention of Cancer in Florence, Italy, he joined the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, where he is now an Associate Professor. In addition to teaching graduate courses in epidemiology, Dr. Kriebel also conducts research in two broad areas. The first is the early detection of the nonmalignant respiratory effects of occupational exposures to dusts and gases, and the second is the development of improved methods for the utilization of quantitative exposure data in epidemiologic models. Karle Mottet, M.D., is Professor of Pathology and Environmental Health at the University of Washington School of Medicine and is Director of the Environmental Pathology and Toxicology Training Program. He received an M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine and did postdoctoral work at Cambridge University in England and the United Nations Environmental Programme in London. He is an American Board of Pathology certified specialist in anatomic pathology. He served as Director of Hospital Pathology at the University of Washington Hospital for 14 years. He was a member and Chairman of the Cancer Committee of the Washington/Alaska Regional Medical Program and was a member of International Working Groups of the World Health Organization (IARC) preparing monographs on trace metal carcinogenesis. He was a fellow of the American Society of Clinical Pathology and is a member of several professional societies including the Society of Toxicology, the American Society for Investigative Pathology, and the International Committee on Trace Metals of the International Commission on Occupational Health. He is a founding member of the International Society for Trace Element Research in humans, and is on the editorial boards of several journals. His research and teaching interests include oncology, teratology, and trace metal pathology of the nervous system, especially mercury. Alfred Neugut, M.D., Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and Public Health at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons as well as Program Director for Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention of the Columbia-Presbyterian Cancer Center. He received his M.D. and Ph.D. in pathobiology in 1977 from Columbia University and later received an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the Columbia School of Public Health. He was trained in internal medicine at the Albert Einstein School of Medicine and in medical oncology at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In addition to being a practicing oncologist, he has published more than 70 articles and chapters on various topics in cancer epidemiology and screening, particularly with regard to colon cancer and multiple primary tumors. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, is on the

OCR for page 764
Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam Executive Committee of the American Society of Preventive Oncology, and is on the editorial board of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. William Nicholson, Ph.D., is Professor of Community Medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center School of Medicine, New York. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington. He has served as Physicist at the Watson Research Laboratories of the International Business Machines Corporation, and Adjunct Associate Professor at Fordham University. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physics Society, and the New York Academy of Sciences. His research interests include occupational and environmental health, and analysis and effect of airborne micro-particulates. Andrew Olshan, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He received his Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Washington. He was a postdoctoral fellow in medical genetics at the University of British Columbia from 1987 to 1989 and Assistant Professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Family Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, from 1989 to 1991. He is a member of several professional societies, including the Society for Epidemiologic Research, the American Society of Human Genetics, the International Genetic Epidemiology Society, and the Teratology Society. His major areas of interest include reproductive and cancer epidemiology. Kathleen Rodgers, Ph.D., is a faculty member in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, at the University of Southern California. Her research interests included the assessment of the immunotoxicologic potential of organophosphate pesticides, the immunopharmacology of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, peritoneal wound healing, and development of immunoassays for ovarian proteins. Dr. Rodgers received a B.S. in biology from the University of California, Irvine, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Riverside. She is a member of the Society of Toxicology (national and Southern California chapters) and the American Association of Immunologists, and is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. She is currently secretary-treasurer for the Immunotoxicology Specialty Section for the Society of Toxicology, and is on the steering committee for the Immunotoxicology Discussion Group. Nancy L. Sprince, M.D., is Associate Professor of Preventive and Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. She received her M.D. from Boston University School of Medicine and her M.P.H. from Harvard School of Public Health. She is board-certified in internal medicine

OCR for page 764
Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam and occupational medicine. She is a Fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians, recipient of an Environmental and Occupational Medicine Academic Award from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and Director of the University of Iowa occupational medicine residency program. Dr. Sprince's research focuses on epidemiologic, clinical, and immunologic aspects of occupational lung diseases, including those due to asbestos, beryllium, cobalt, and metal-working fluids. Clifford Weisel, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, within the Department of Environmental and Community Medicine. He is a member of the Exposure Measurement and Assessment Division of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute and of the Graduate Faculty of Rutgers University in both the Environmental Science Department and the Graduate Program in Public Health. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. from the University of Rhode Island, concentrating in the areas of marine and atmospheric chemistry and analytical chemistry. He is a member of various scientific organizations including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, and the International Society of Exposure Analysis. His current research interests are directed toward an understanding of environmental exposure and associated dose in humans. STAFF BIOGRAPHIES Michael Stoto, Ph.D., is the Director of the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He received an A.B. in statistics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in statistics and demography from Harvard University, and was formerly an Associate Professor of Public Policy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. A member of the professional staff since 1987, Dr. Stoto directed the IOM's effort in support of the Public Health Service's Healthy People 2000 project and has worked on IOM projects addressing a number of issues in public health, health statistics, health promotion and disease prevention, vaccine safety and policy, and AIDS. Dr. Stoto is co-author of Data for Decisions: Information Strategies for Policy Makers and numerous articles in statistics, demography, health policy, and other fields. He is a member of the American Public Health Association, the American Statistical Association, the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, the Population Association of America, and other organizations. Susan M. Rogers is a Program Officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. She received a B.S. in

OCR for page 764
Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam biology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and an M.A. in demography from Georgetown University. She previously worked for the Committee on Population and the Committee on AIDS Research in the Commission on Behavior, Social Sciences, and Education, National Academy of Sciences. Her research interests include reproductive health and health policy. Diane J. Mundt, Ph.D., is a Program Officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and the Medical Follow-Up Agency of the Institute of Medicine. She received a B.S. in biology and English from Valparaiso University, an M.S. in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Massachusetts. She continued her postdoctoral work at Columbia University under a fellowship from the National Institutes of Health. She is formerly an Associate Professor of biostatistics and epidemiology at Georgetown University School of Medicine. Dr. Mundt's work with the Medical Follow-Up Agency involves follow-up of HIV+ service members; she is also involved in a further study of health consequences of veterans. She is a member of the American Public Health Association and the Society for Epidemiologic Research. Cynthia H. Abel is a Research Associate in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. She received a B.A. in government and political science from the University of Maryland and is working towards a master of public policy degree. She is also involved with several other projects in the area of health promotion and disease prevention and personal health care services. She previously worked for the IOM Administrative and Finance Office, the National Academy of Sciences' Committee to Review the Safety of DOE Nuclear Reactors, and the National Research Council's Governing Board. Catharyn T. Liverman is a Research Associate in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Division. Her undergraduate degree is in biology from Wake Forest University and she recently received a master of library science degree from the University of Maryland, specializing in medical science information services. Library experience includes work at the Naval War College Library in Newport, Rhode Island, and at the National Agricultural Library. She previously served as the research associate on the IOM study on the health effects of mustard gas and Lewisite.