About the Authors

Jonh C. Buckhouse is a professor in the Department of Rangeland Resources, Oregon State University. He has received both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in range science/watershed management from Utah State University. The focus of the majority of his research has been on watershed management and water resources research.

Frank E. Busby (Chair) is director of U.S. Programs, Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, Morrilton, Arkansas. He holds a Ph.D. in range watershed science from Utah State University. He has had extensive experience in range management, having served as an extension rangeland management specialist, director of the Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, and associate dean of the College of Agriculture and head of the Department of Range Management, University of Wyoming.

Donald C. Clanton received his Ph.D. in animal nutrition from Utah State University. Now retired, he was a professor of animal science at the University of Nebraska. His research includes ruminant nutrition, particularly as it effects reproduction, and range nutrition.

George C. Coggins earned a J.D. at the University of Michigan Law School and is currently the Frank Edwards Tyler Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Kansas Law School. During his career he has focused on public land law and natural resource law.

Gary R. Evans is the chief science advisor to the Secretary of Agriculture and the staff for global change issues, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Arlington, Virginia. He holds a Ph.D. in natural resources decision theory. His primary research has been in forest biology and ecology.

   

Antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata)



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Rangeland Health: New Methods to Classify, Inventory, and Monitor Rangelands About the Authors Jonh C. Buckhouse is a professor in the Department of Rangeland Resources, Oregon State University. He has received both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in range science/watershed management from Utah State University. The focus of the majority of his research has been on watershed management and water resources research. Frank E. Busby (Chair) is director of U.S. Programs, Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, Morrilton, Arkansas. He holds a Ph.D. in range watershed science from Utah State University. He has had extensive experience in range management, having served as an extension rangeland management specialist, director of the Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, and associate dean of the College of Agriculture and head of the Department of Range Management, University of Wyoming. Donald C. Clanton received his Ph.D. in animal nutrition from Utah State University. Now retired, he was a professor of animal science at the University of Nebraska. His research includes ruminant nutrition, particularly as it effects reproduction, and range nutrition. George C. Coggins earned a J.D. at the University of Michigan Law School and is currently the Frank Edwards Tyler Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Kansas Law School. During his career he has focused on public land law and natural resource law. Gary R. Evans is the chief science advisor to the Secretary of Agriculture and the staff for global change issues, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Arlington, Virginia. He holds a Ph.D. in natural resources decision theory. His primary research has been in forest biology and ecology.     Antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata)

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Rangeland Health: New Methods to Classify, Inventory, and Monitor Rangelands Kirk L. Gadzia is president of Resource Management Services, Bernalillo, New Mexico. He holds an M.S. in range science. His career focus has been on private education of resource managers in the field of rangeland and wildlife management. Charles M. Jarecki has been the owner/operator of a cattle ranch in Poison, Montana, for many years. He attended New York State College of Agriculture and received his degree from Montana State University. His active involvement in range management entails practical and applied research. Linda A. Joyce is project leader at the Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Forest Service, Fort Collins, Colorado. Her primary research focus is ecosystem processes on rangelands. She earned her Ph.D. in range ecology at Colorado State University. Dick Loper is president and owner of Prairie Winds Consulting Service, Lander, Wyoming, a range management and range science advisory concern. His M.S. in range science is from Kansas State University. As a rangeland specialist, his primary area of research has been natural resource management. Daniel L. Merkel is range conservationist for the Soft Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Denver, Colorado. His research work includes land classification, renewable resource inventory techniques, range improvement and management practices, and critical area stabilization. He has focused on soil science and range management. George B. Ruyle is associate research scientist and range management extension specialist, School of Renewable and Natural Resources, University of Arizona. His research interests include plant and animal interactions on rangelands. He earned his Ph.D. in range science from Utah State University. Jack Ward Thomas is chief research wildlife biologist and project leader of the Range and Wildlife Habitat Reserve, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Forest Service, LaGrande, Oregon. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts in wildlife biology. His research includes impact of wildlife populations in wild and urbanized settings, sociobioeconomic implications of game habitat manipulation, and forestry/wildlife relationships.

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Rangeland Health: New Methods to Classify, Inventory, and Monitor Rangelands Johanna H. Wald is a senior staff attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council in its Washington, D.C., office. She received her LL.B. at Yale Law School and has focused during her career on federal land and resource management and environmental law. Her expertise is in federal range management issues. Stephen E. Williams is a professor and department head at the University of Wyoming. His teaching and research interests include soil biology and biochemistry, forest and range soils, and soil microbial ecology. He earned his Ph.D. in soil science and microbiology at North Carolina State University.