NUTRITIONAL PROMISE

Main Components

 

Essential Amino Acids

 

Moisture (g)

11

Cystine

1.9

Food energy (Kc)

336

Isoleucine

3.2

Protein (g)

9.6

Leucine

6.0

Carbohydrate (g)

73

Lysine

2.3

Fat (g)

2.0

Methionine

2.1

Fiber (g)

3.0

Phenylalanine

4.0

Ash (g)

2.9

Threonine

2.8

Vitamin A (RE)

8

Tryptophan

1.2

Thiamin (mg)

0.30

Tyrosine

1.7

Riboflavin (mg)

0.18

Valine

4.1

Niacin (mg)

2.5

 

 

Vitamin C (mg)

88

 

 

Calcium (mg)

159

 

 

Chloride (mg)

13

 

 

Chromium (μg)

250

 

 

Copper (mg)

0.7

 

 

Iron (mg)

5.8

 

 

Magnesium (mg)

170

 

 

Manganese (mg)

6.4

 

 

Phosphorus (mg)

378

 

 

Potassium (mg)

401

 

 

Sodium (mg)

47

 

 

Zinc (mg)

2

 

 

Tef has as much, or even more, food value than the major grains: wheat, barley, and maize, for instance. However, this is probably because it is always eaten in the whole-grain form: the germ and bran are consumed along with the endosperm.

Tef grains are reported to contain 9-11 percent protein, an amount slightly higher than in normal sorghum, maize, or oats. However, samples tested in the United States have consistently shown even higher protein levels: 14-15 percent.

The protein's digestibility is probably high because the main protein fractions—albumin, glutelin, and globulin—are the most digestible types. The albumin fraction is particularly rich in lysine. Judging by the response from Americans allergic to wheat, tef is essentially free of gluten, the protein that causes bread to rise. Nonetheless, tef used in injera does ''rise" (see page 219).



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