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Appendixes

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APPENDIX A Professional-Development Programs that Responded to the Committee's Request for Information, Organized by Geographic Locations ARIZONA 1. Science in Action Tucson Unified School District; University of Arizona Contact: Gail Paulin, Tucson, (520) 617-7052, FAX: (520) 617-7051, Internet: gpaulin @ ccit.arizona.edu Cosponsored by the Tucson Unified School District and the University of Ari- zona, Science in Action brings together K-6 science teachers and university scientists to develop hands-on science activities for K-6 classrooms. The objec- tives of the program are to familiarize teachers with local research resources, to encourage collaboration among teachers and scientists, to help teachers foster enthusiasm for science among their students, and to improve student achievement in science. With funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the pro- gram familiarizes participants with Science in Action concepts and materials Information about almost 200 programs was collected by the committee in 1992 and 1993, and the information was used to assess the characteristics of effective professional-development pro- grams. Appendix A was updated in late 1995. Some of the original programs that had been exam- ined and then listed in this appendix had ended; descriptions of these programs have been removed. Several original programs had changed scope to some extent; these are designated with asterisks (*) to indicate that they are not now exactly as they were when the committee reviewed them. Some entirely new programs were identified during the updating; they are designated with double asterisks (**) 93

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94 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS through 5 days of workshops, discussions, demonstrations, and lectures. In addi- tion, participants practice implementing program concepts in a 3-day teaching practicum with area students. Teachers are encouraged to present the material in thematic or interdisciplinary units; to emphasize mathematical, social, and tech- nical applications; and to include the arts when possible. In light of the high numbers of limited-English-proficient students in Tucson who speak Spanish as a first language, the program provides Spanish translations of all materials. 2. Science Update Series and Research/Technology Tours Arizona Alliance for Mathematics, Science and Technology Education Contact: Charles Hoyt, Phoenix, (602) 943-9332, FAX: (602) 589-2716, Internet: n/a For 6 years, the Arizona Alliance for Mathematics, Science and Technology Education has offered a Science Update Series to K-12 teachers. Funded by local education agencies, the program offers hands-on training to teachers in science, mathematics, and technology. The presenters include research scientists, tech- nologists, professors, and members of various professional societies. The series is made up of lectures, discussions, and laboratory activities and runs between 8 hours and 32 hours. Program goals are to update the participants' knowledge of mathematics, science, and technology and to improve their strategies for teaching these subjects. A new biotechnology training session for elementary- and junior- high-school teachers runs from 1 to 5 days. The alliance also sponsors Research/ Technology Tours, which take about 150 grade 6-12 teachers to various research sites. Tours include 1-day visits to the University of Arizona laboratories, where teachers are updated on current laboratory research and technology. On returning to their classrooms, teachers are expected to present their new knowledge to their students and to encourage them to use the information in their development of laboratory and science-fair projects. CALIFORNIA 3. City Science Program, Science and Health Education Partnership University of California-San Francisco; San Francisco Unified School District Contact: Liesl Chatman, San Francisco, (415) 476-0337, FAX: (415) 476 9926, Internet: liesl@itsa.ucsf.edu With support from the National Science Foundation, the Science and Health Education Partnership has developed a K-5 hands-on science curriculum that is being implemented throughout the San Francisco public schools. Over a 4-year period, the project aims to familiarize K-5 teachers with the City Science curricu- lum through 1-month summer sessions and monthly Saturday meetings through

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PROFESSIONAL-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS BY LOCATION 95 out the academic year. During these sessions, master teachers and scientists work together to provide model teaching experiences for participants. Program goals include providing participants with the background and skills they need to facili- tate City Science activities in cooperative groups, to couple hands-on science with hands-on assessment, and to integrate science with writing, reading, and mathematics. Participants work with a team of lead teachers to provide inservice training to noninstitute teachers. In addition, they are expected to work closely with principals to monitor the implementation of the science curriculum. 4. Exploratorium Teacher Institute The Exploratorium Contact: Karen Mendelow, San Francisco, (415) 561-0313, FAX: (415) 561 - 0307, I n t e r n e t : k a r e n m @ e x p l o r a t o r i u m . e d u The Exploratorium Teacher Institute provides middle-school and high-school teachers with 4 weeks of science and mathematics learning with Exploratorium exhibits and staff. Activities include hands-on experiences with exhibit appara- tus and small-group discussions about how to use experiential learning in their classrooms. Participants build models of the exhibits that can be transported to their classrooms. Discussion topics, which often reflect the Science Framework for California Public Schools, include physical sciences, life sciences, and math- ematics. Subjects investigated are vision, light, hearing, sound, genetics, math- ematics, ecology, plant growth, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, and weather. Program facilitators develop workshops on the ideas and needs voiced by participating teachers, including the specific needs of teachers who work with limited-English-speaking students. As followup, the program offers four Satur- day discussions during the academic year, which are open to all institute alumni. Formal program evaluations are an integral part of the program. 5. San Francisco Zoological Gardens Contact: Diane Demee-Benoit, San Francisco, (415) 753-7073, FAX: (415) 681-2039, Internet: n/a Motivated by the belief that teachers' skills and confidence in conservation edu- cation can affect student attitudes toward the environment, the San Francisco Zoo has expanded its role in classroom science education to include teacher programs. Through workshops, the program demonstrates exemplary hands-on science teaching that cuts across scientific disciplines. The workshops, developed for multicultural audiences, last 7 hours and include the following topics: endan- gered species, rain forests, wetlands, applied ecology, and insects in the class- room. A shorter version of the workshop on rain forests is also presented at area conferences. The program aims to bridge formal and informal education, to align

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96 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS science instruction with the new Science Framework for California Public Schools, and to give teachers an active role in improving science education. 6. Teacher Education in Biology San Francisco State University Contact: Lane Conn, San Francisco, (415) 338-7872, FAX: (415) 338 2295, Internet: Iconn@sfsu.edu The Teacher Education in Biology program offers an array of opportunities in biology, biotechnology, and bioethics. Organized by scientists, social scientists, and science teachers, activities include a 10-day laboratory workshop at one of four sites in California, a 3-day summer symposium, and several 2-day aca- demic year followup meetings. Program goals are to familiarize participants with new teaching strategies, leadership skills, current issues in science-educa- tion reform and biology research, the Science Framework for California Public Schools, opportunities for networking with teachers and scientists, and hands-on activities for the classroom. Program participants include California middle- and high-school science teachers, district science coordinators, and university teacher-education faculty. Teachers receive stipends of $60/day and classroom resources. 7. California Science Project University of California Contact: Rollie Otto, Berkeley, (510) 486-5325, FAX: (916) 754-8086, Internet: rjetto@lvl.gov The California Science Project (CSP) was initiated in 1989 with funds from the Intersegmental Education Budget of the University of California, which admin- isters the program on behalf of California's teachers. A 17-member advisory committee is composed of representatives from all the major science-education segments of California, including higher education (the Association of Indepen- dent California Colleges and Universities, the California Community Colleges, the California Postsecondary Education Commission, California State Univer- sity, and the University of California), K-12 teachers, the national laboratories, and the Industry Education Council of California. CSP has a broad mandate to provide staff-development opportunities to teachers of science in grades K-14, building on models of the California Writing Project and the California Math- ematics Project. Campuses in the University of California system compete for funds to conduct professional-development programs for teachers. Current CSP programs and sites are California Science Project of Inland Northern California, at California State University, Chico, with Butte College and Shasta College; Sacramento Area Science Project, at California State University, Sacramento and the University of California, Davis; Bay Area Science Project, at the Univer

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PROFESSIONAL-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS BY LOCATION 97 sity of California, Berkeley; Central Valley Science Project, at California State University, Fresno, with Fresno Pacific College; South Coast Science Project, at the University of California, Santa Barbara; USCILAUSD Science Project, at the University of Southern California; the UCLA Science Project, at the University of California, Los Angeles with the Los Angeles Educational Partnership; Or- ange County Science Education Network, at the University of California, Irvine with several community colleges and Chapman College; Inland Area Science Project, at the University of California, Riverside and California State University, San Bernardino; CSP of San Diego and Imperial Counties, at the University of California, San Diego and San Diego State University; and Central Coastal Area Science Project, at the University of California, Santa Cruz. *~8. Evolution and the Nature of Science Institute San Jose State University; Indiana University Contact: ,Iean Beard, San ,Iose, CA, (408) 924-4870, or Craig Nelson, Bloomington, IN, (612) 855-1345, FAX: (408) 924-4840, Internet: beard @ biomail.sjsu.edu Three National Science Foundation grants to the same co-principal investigators have supported 3-week residential institutes (ENSI) for 30 high-school biology teachers for 6 years (1989-1995), have supported additional preparation (LTPP) of 38 institute graduates for four summers (1991-1994), and have partially sup- ported 36 two-week satellite institutes for up to 20 teachers (1992-1995) taught by pairs of specially prepared institute alumni. The current grant will support additional satellites (SENSI) beginning in summer 1996 at sites from Ohio to California. The summer institutes and two academic-year followup sessions (fall and spring) are designed to update participants' knowledge of the nature of science, general organic evolution, and human evolution and to help them inte- grate these topics into their teaching. Teachers are encouraged to apply in teams from schools, school districts, or geographic regions so as to have colleagues to work with after the summer. The institutes consist of curriculum-development activities, lectures, seminars, demonstration, discussions, hands-on activities and field work. Participants are assigned to apply some of their new knowledge in teaching, monitor their experiences, and report back to the group at followup sessions. A more-complete explanation of the ENSI/SENSI program content and philosophy has been accepted for publication in the American Biology Teacher and is tentatively titled "Better Biology Teaching by Emphasizing Evolution and the Nature of Science." 9. AIMS Instructional Leadership Program AIMS Education Foundation Contact: Arthur Wiebe, Fresno, (209) 255-4094, FAX: (209) 255-6396, Internet: aimsed@fresno.edu

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98 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS The AIMS (Activities Integrating Math and Science) Education Foundation, an educational nonprofit organization, has provided hands-on leadership training to over 80,000 teachers in 46 states. Since 1986, AIMS facilitators, who are pre- dominantly classroom teachers with 7 weeks of special training, have imple- mented 1-week staff-development programs for K-8 teachers. Through hands-on workshops, discussions, demonstrations, and lectures, AIMS informs participants about learning theory, science and mathematics content, and teaching strategies that are consistent with the guidelines of the American Association for the Ad- vancement of Science Project 2061, National Research Council standards, and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics standards. The goals of the pro- gram are to enable participants to implement a hands-on, integrated mathematics- science program in their classrooms and to foster the leadership skills needed to share with their colleagues. The project is intended to improve student achieve- ment in mathematics and science and to encourage networking among teachers. The program is funded primarily by local education agencies. Former partici- pants often serve as instructors for related 1-day and 1-week workshops. 10. Central Valley Science Project School of Education, California State University, Fresno Contact: James E. Marshall, Fresno, (209) 278-0239, FAX: (209) 278 0404, Internet: jamesm@zimmer.csufresno.edu A primary goal of this project is to encourage teachers to assume science-educa- tion leadership roles in their schools, in their districts, or at the state level. Through networking activities and a 14-day residential summer institute in the mountains, the project aims to provide high-quality professional development for teachers, establish an active science-education network in the Central Valley, and promote community participation in science education. Ultimately, the project aims to improve the education of K-12 students, who will benefit from the efforts of better-informed, qualified, and motivated teachers. 11. Schools and Colleges for Advancing the Teaching of Science California State University, Sacramento Contact: Tom Smithson, Sacramento, (916) 278-5487, FAX: (916) 278 6664, Internet: scats@csus.edu Schools and Colleges for Advancing the Teaching of Science (SCATS) is an alliance of grade K-12 teachers, university and community-college faculty, and local industrial scientists and engineers who work to improve science education in the Sacramento area public and private schools. For 11 years, SCATS has offered grant programs, workshops, seminars, dinner meetings, field trips, and

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PROFESSIONAL-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS BY LOCATION 99 networking opportunities to science educators in the Sacramento region. SCATS projects cover a wide range of disciplines, including chemistry, biology, physics, earth science, astronomy, meteorology, pedagogy, and computer science. Under- lying each initiative is a belief in the importance of developing professional- enrichment activities that join educators from all sectors of the community. 12. Amgen Inc. Lab Kit Contact: Hugh Nelson, Newbury Park, (805) 498-8663, FAX: (805) 499 3549, Internet: n/a In 1991, Amgen Inc., a biotechnology pharmaceutical company, developed a Lab Kit to educate area teachers about gene splicing and complex procedures used in extended laboratory experiments. With assistance from a local school district, Amgen integrated the Lab Kit into the curricula of 20 high schools during the 1994-1995 school year, reaching a total of 75 teachers and 2,500 students. Amgen has also sponsored a school lecture series and a teacher-intern program. 13. Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education-San Francisco Bay Area Lawrence Hall of Science; University of California, Berkeley Contact: Marie Earl, Santa Clara, (408) 496-5340, FAX: (408) 496-5333, Internet: mlearl@aol.com IISME' s core program, the Summer Fellowship Program, provides San Francisco Bay Area science, mathematics, and computer-science teachers with mentored, paid summer jobs at high-technology companies, government agencies, and uni- versity laboratories. There is year-round assistance to teachers as they strive to meet their commitment to translating their summer experiences into updated and enriched classroom instruction. Summer meetings, peer coaching, resource- brokering, academic-year workshops, small grants, and an electronic network are among the services provided to teachers. Each summer, 80-90 scientists and engineers work side by side with IISME teachers on technical assignments. Many of these industry-school relationships continue after the summer, as mentors host students at their worksites, make classroom presentations or attend career fairs, donate surplus equipment or supplies, or provide advice to curriculum commit- tees. Funding from the National Science Foundation enabled the Triangle Coali- tion for Science and Technology Education and IISME to work together to repli- cate the summer-fellowship-program model nationally. IISME' s Summer Fellowship Program has been recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as a model program helping the nation to achieve the national education Goals 2000.

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100 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS *14. NSF-Advances in Biological Science/Institutionalizing Student Research Projects Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology, California State University, Northridge Contact: Steven Oppenheimer, Northridge, (818) 885-3336, FAX: (818) 885-2034, Internet: n/a For 10 years, the Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology at California State University-Northridge has offered an inservice program to area teachers. With funding from the National Science Foundation, the Howard Hughes Medi- cal Institute, the Urban Community Service Program, and the Joseph Drown Foundation, the center provides lectures, laboratories, curriculum-development activities, and discussions addressing cutting-edge issues in biology. Program facilitators have developed participant materials into biology and life-science curriculum guides for the Los Angeles Unified School District that have also been distributed nationally. Recent emphasis has been on training teachers to incorporate student research projects into their curricula in the hope that abstracts of student projects would be published in the Journal of Student Research Ab- stracts. *15. Science Programs for Teachers Grades Kindergarten through College Center X, UCLA Graduate School of Education Contact: Janet Thornber, Los Angeles, (310) 825-1109, FAX: (310) 206- 5369, Internet: thornber@gse.ucla.edu The professional-development arm of Center X offers programs for science teach- ers of all grade levels. It currently houses the UCLA Science Project, a compo- nent of the California Subject Matter Projects; UCLA Project Issues (Integrated Systems for Studying Urban Environmental Science); and a professional-devel- opment program of workshops available to all schools in Los Angeles County. Programs focus on urban science and promote strategies that make science acces- sible to all students, whatever their backgrounds. Programs offer intensive insti- tutes during the summer and school year and model constructivist approaches to teaching and learning. Teacher participants attend interactive seminars with faculty and experts in the field; perform field studies, mini-investigations, and self-guided city explorations; see models of effective pedagogy; and compile constructivist teaching units for their own classrooms. 16. TOPS Occidental College Contact: April Mazzeo, Los Angeles, (213) 259-2892, FAX: (213) 341 4912, Internet: amazzeo@oxy.edu

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PROFESSIONAL-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS BY LOCATION 101 With funding from the National Science Foundation, Occidental College's De- partments of Biology, Chemistry, and Education offer a 2-week summer institute and a "van laboratory" service to high-school teachers. The program, TOPS (Teachers + Occidental = Partnership in Science), aims to provide high-school teachers with advanced scientific instrumentation for hands-on integrated labora- tory experiences in line with the state's new Science Framework for California Public Schools. The summer institute, held at Occidental's laboratories, involves participants in experiments in molecular biology and analytical chemistry as applied to life science. Followup is provided by a TOPS resource teacher who travels with the "van laboratory" to participants' classrooms, providing the equip- ment that they need to carry out the experiments. Each institute is limited to 30 chemistry and biology teachers, who each receive a $400 stipend for their partici- pation. Preference is given to teams of biology and chemistry teachers who apply from the same school. 17. The Caltech Precollege Science Initiative California Institute of Technology Contact: Jim Bower, Pasadena, (818) 395-3222, FAX: (818) 440-0865, Internet: j.bower@capsi.caltech.edu The Caltech Precollege Science Initiative (CAPSI) supports a number of coordi- nated reform efforts in precollege science education. These efforts focus on encouraging inquiry and discovery in the learning process, on promoting the active participation of underrepresented student populations, on fostering coop- eration between scientists and educators, and on encouraging teachers to partici- pate fully in the process of education reform. A primary goal is to provide materials and methods for improving science education that can be applied across the nation. The CAPSI effort began with an emphasis on the needs of elemen- tary-school children and has more recently begun a wide-ranging set of pro- grams. The elementary-school science program, originally dubbed Project SEED, is now the districtwide science program of the Pasadena Unified School District. As a result of its success, work has started on expanding the elementary-school program to the middle grades and on the establishment of models for the continu- ing professional development of teachers. CAPSI also has initiated the Pasadena Center for Improving Elementary Science Education through a partnership with the Pasadena Unified School District and support from the National Science Foundation. This program is designed to support other urban school districts in California that seek to introduce or enhance high-quality hands-on science in- struction based on the Pasadena model. Other CAPSI programs include the development and pilot testing of an inquiry-based undergraduate science course for preservice teachers and the creation of computer simulations to complement students' hands-on experiences.

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162 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS VIRGINIA 164. Virginia Bay Team Virginia Institute of Marine Science; College of William and Mary Contact: Lee Larkin, Gloucester Point, (804) 642-7172, FAX: (804) 642 7161, Internet: larkin@vims.edu The Bay Team Program was organized in 1985 to assist K-12 teachers in teaching about Virginia's marine and estuarine resources. Two experienced teachers staff the Bay Team project and visit schools throughout Virginia demonstrating teach- ing strategies and disseminating new resources and information. Associated activities include curriculum development and teacher-training workshops. The Bay Team teaches in more than 700 classrooms each year and has provided instruction for some 140,000 students and their teachers since the program's inception. The Bay Team is financially supported by the Commonwealth of Virginia. 165. Discovery Quest Virginia Living Museum Contact: Peter Money, Newport News, (804) 595-1900, FAX: (804) 595 4897, Internet: n/a Based at the Virginia Living Museum, Discovery Quest involves K-12 science teachers in a summer program of hands-on science activities that emphasize the use of live animals, artifacts, and specimens. The goals of the program are to encourage teachers to incorporate hands-on activities and field experiences into their science teaching, to increase their content knowledge, and to involve them in the development of curricular materials. With funding from the National Science Foundation, Discovery Quest has provided teachers with lectures, dem- onstrations, workshops, discussion, and field work for 5 years. *~166. Inservice programs National Association of Biology Teachers Contact: Mary Louise Bellamy or Kathy Frame, Reston, (703) 471-1134 or (800) 406-0775, FAX: (703) 435-5582, Internet: n/a The National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT) offers inservice pro- grams to hundreds of teachers each year. The primary goal of these workshops is to bring biology teachers together to share classroom ideas and experiences, become familiar with new technology and diverse methods of teaching in the field, and improve student outcomes in their classrooms. One such new program is the Shoestring Biotechnology Workshop, which requires each participant to establish a partnership with an industrial scientist and another educator to work

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PROFESSIONAL-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS BY LOCATION 163 together throughout a school year. A stipend, expenses, and continuing-educa- tion credit will be provided. NABT also publishes manuals to promote hands-on laboratory experiments, including "Biology on a Shoestring," "Neuroscience Classroom and Laboratory Activities," and "Working with DNA and Bacteria in Precollege Science Classrooms." NABT receives funding from various sources. 167. Teacher Intern Program Merck & Co. Contact: Suzanne Auckerman, Elkton, (703) 298-4873, FAX: (703) 298 4194, Internet: auckerfp@merck.com Merck & Co. is a chemical and pharmaceutical manufacturing company with a wide range of operations. Among employees, scientific expertise is mainly in chemical engineering, chemistry, and microbiology. The company offers shadow programs, during which middle- and high-school students are matched with em- ployees for a 1-day site visit at Merck. The Teacher Intern Program provides teachers with the opportunity to spend 2 weeks at Merck in activities that provide an overview of the facility. A second project develops business-education part- nerships between K-12 education, higher education, adult education, and busi- ness and industry. Merck's goals are to improve educational quality, resource accessibility, educational access, and workforce preparation for persons in the greater Shenandoah Valley region. Additional outreach includes career fairs, equipment donations to schools, and classroom visits by Merck scientists. 168. Teacher Training Institutes National Association of Partners in Education, Inc. Contact: ,Ianet Cox, Alexandria, (703) 836-4880, FAX: (703) 836-6941, Internet: n/a The National Association of Partners in Education is a nonprofit membership organization that serves the schools, businesses, education, community groups, and individual volunteers that work together to help students achieve educational excellence. Specific projects include development of resource materials, a clear- inghouse on partnerships, regional conferences, teacher-training institutes fo- cused on the effective use of volunteers in the classroom, and other education- related initiatives. The training component often addresses how to develop partnership programs that target specific disciplines, such as science. 169. Fellowships in Biology and Chemistry Biology Department, College of William and Mary Contact: Sharon Broadwater, Williamsburg, (804) 221-2216, FAX: (804) 221 - 6483, I n t e r n e t : s t b r 0 a @ f a c s t a f f . w m . e d u

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164 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS With funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Biology Depart- ment of the College of William and Mary offered a summer research program, Fellowships in Biology and Chemistry, to four junior- and senior-high-school teachers. The program engaged teachers in individual research projects with biology or chemistry faculty members for a 6-week period. Participating teach- ers were given a list of faculty members and research topics from which to choose. Although fellowship responsibilities focused on research, each partici- pant was expected to complete a paper or offer a seminar on a project topic. In addition, the teachers spent 1-2 hours per day at the Governor's School on cam- pus during 4 weeks of the fellowship. Stipends of $3,000 were provided. The project is looking for other sources of support to permit it to continue. 170. Topics in Biology Biology Department, College of William and Mary Contact: Sharon Broadwater, Williamsburg, (804) 221-2216, FAX: (804) 221 - 6483, I n t e r n e t : s t b r o a @ f a c s t a f f . w m . e d u Topics in Biology is a series of courses designed by faculty in the Biology Department of the College of William and Mary. The project objective was to update middle- and high-school teachers on trends and technologies in genetics and cell biology. Admitted on a first-come-first-served basis, 16-18 teachers attended the program each year. They received one graduate credit for each course. With funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the program provided lectures, seminars, demonstrations, workshops, and discussions. The project is looking for other funding sources. 171. Introduction to Microscopy Central Virginia Governor's School for Science and Technology Contact: Cheryl Lindeman, Lynchhurg, (804) 582-1104, FAX: (804) 239 4140, Internet: clindema@pen.kl2.va.us The Central Virginia Governor's School for Science and Technology offers work- shops for K-12 life-science teachers as needed in microscopy. Through hands-on laboratory activities, they explore the educational applications of microscopy using video microscopy equipment and a transmission electron microscope. Par- ticipants are given the opportunity to plan and record their own video tapes of living organisms and to make black-and-white prints of electron Barographs. *~172. Student-Centered Learning Using BIOQUEST Computer Simulations Central Virginia Governor's School for Science and Technology Contact: Cheryl Lindeman, Lynchhurg, (804) 582-1104, FAX: (804) 239- 4140, Internet: clindema@pen.kl2.va.us

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PROFESSIONAL-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS BY LOCATION 165 High-School life-science teachers explore biological concepts, using computer simulations from the BIOQUEST library. The activities parallel classroom man- agement for student-centered learning. Each group poses problems, solves prob- lems, and persuades peers, using the computer as a tool. The simulations involve topics in genetics, physiology, and ecology. *~173. Utilizing Technology to Enhance Learning Central Virginia Governor's School for Science and Technology Contact: Tom Morgan, Lynchhurg, (804) 582-1104, FAX: (804) 239-4140, Internet: tmorgan@pen.kl2.va.us As computer technologies become more prevalent in schools, it is essential that educators harness the capabilities of the technologies to enhance student learning. Participants in this hands-on seminar learn a simple strategy to use in planning and evaluating implementations of computer technologies to ensure that the tech- nologies are being used to support student learning. The generic strategy derived from instructional design principles can be used for all grade levels and in all subjects. *~174. Using Computers in the Science Laboratory Central Virginia Governor's School for Science and Technology Contact: Bill Bishop, Lynchhurg, (804) 582-1104, FAX: (804) 239-4140, Internet: bbishop@cvgs.kl2.va.us The Central Virginia Governor's School (CVGS) for Science and Technology offers this workshop to middle-school and high-school science teachers. Partici- pants explore, through hands-on activities, how computers are used at CVGS to provide a variety of learning experiences. Emphasis is placed on using computers as tools for data collection, data analysis, accessing information on the Internet, and simulations of situations not suitable for actual experimentation in the high- school laboratory. *~175. Selecting and Using Data Collection and Analysis Technology for Math and Science Central Virginia Governor's School for Science and Technology Contact: Bill Bishop or,Iane Simms, Lynchhurg, (804) 582-1104, FAX: (804) 239-4140, Internet: bbishop@cvgs.kl2.va.us or jsimms@cvgs.kl2.va.us This workshop is offered for teachers and administrators in mathematics and science for grades 9-12. It is an introduction to calculator- and computer-based data-collection sensors, TI-82 sensors, and data-analysis software. Guidelines for

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166 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS selecting and using computer-interfaced data-collection sensors, TI-82 CB1 sen- sors, and data-analysis software in mathematics and science classes are presented through a variety of hands-on activities. WASHINGTON 176. "Science in a Box" Elementary Science Curriculum Olympic Educational Service District 114 Contact: Brian Bennett, Bremerton, (360) 692-3239, FAX: same, Internet: bbennett@orca.esdll4.wednet.edu The Olympic Educational Service District 114 (ESD 114) "Science in a Box" supports the idea that an activity-based program should be the core of elemen- tary-school science curricula. The program offers at feast four subject kits at each grade level, K-6. The kit lessons teach students science-process skills through hands-on lessons covering the earth, life, and physical sciences. All kits include a teacher guide, student worksheets, and consumable and nonconsumable materials for presenting 8-10 lessons to classrooms of 32 students. The Olympic ESD 114 Science Kit Center provides the material-support system to restock and maintain the kits and provides training opportunities for the teachers who use the program. Through using and restocking each kit several times during the school year, the Science Kit Center is able to provide an efficient and cost-effective method of supporting elementary-school science education. In addition, the Sci- ence Kit Center staff provides resources, technical assistance, and in-class model lessons and demonstrations for region teachers and students. 177. Practical and Creative Ways to Strengthen Student Achievement in Science Puget Sound Educational Service District Contact: Ron Thompson, Mercer Island, (206) 232-8042, FAX: same, Internet n/a This program will enable participants to modify their current science programs to meet the new national science recommendations. Emphasis is on adding award- winning problem-solving laboratory activities to existing courses. A hands-on workshop also provides a variety of laboratory-performance-based assessment tools for evaluating student progress. This offering is appropriate for science teachers of grades 3-12. Participants will receive student-ready activities specific for their grade levels. Some of the curriculum materials used are from a 1-year high-school biology curriculum titled "Biology: As Scientific Inquiry."

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PROFESSIONAL-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS BY LOCATION 178. Padilla Bay Teacher Workshops Western Washington University Contact: G. Alexander, Mount Vernon, (360) 428-1558, FAX: (360) 428 1491, Internet: alex@padillabay.gov 167 Through a series of half-day workshops, K-12 teachers gain experience in estua- rine ecology, discuss the importance of problem-solving in environmental educa- tion, and learn how to integrate topics into their classroom curriculum. 179. Project WILD Washington Department of Wildlife Contact: Margaret Tudor, Olympia, (360) 902-2808, FAX: (360) 902 2157, Internet: tudormtt@dfw.wa.gov For 8 years, the state of Washington's Department of Wildlife has sponsored Project WILD, a course developed by and for K-12 teachers with input from biologists. Results of this grass-roots effort to improve teaching and student outcomes include district adoption of a curriculum for sixth-graders, the develop- ment of over 50 habitat projects, and widespread use of activities derived from the course. The program also produces a newsletter and issues grants to develop school habitat programs. There is also a nature mapping program in which data collected on fish, wildlife, and habitats can be contributed to the state biological database. 180. Science-Education Partnership Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Contact: Nancy Hutchison, Seattle, (206) 667-4486, FAX: (206) 667-6525, Internet: nhutchi@fred.fhcrc.org To help teachers introduce current biomedical research concepts into the class- room, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center developed a summer pro- gram in 1991 to pair middle- and high-school science teachers with scientists at the center, local biotechnology companies, and the University of Washington. The program immerses teachers in hands-on, current research techniques through laboratory experiments and aims to familiarize them with inquiry-based learning. Teachers participate in a spring workshop, a 2-week summer immersion experi- ence, and followup days during the academic year. For their participation, teach- ers receive a $500 stipend, University of Washington credits, opportunities to borrow biotechnology-laboratory equipment kits, and classroom visits from the scientist-mentors. Initial funding for the program came from the center; current funding is from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Discuren Charitable Foundation, and other local foundations. The McEachern Foundation, for ex

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168 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS ample, helped to establish a teaching laboratory and equipment kits to loan to teachers. 181. The University of Washington Science/Mathematics Project College of Education, University of Washington Contact: Carole Kubota, Seattle, (206) 543-6636, FAX: (206) 543-8439, Internet: kubota@u.washington.edu The University of Washington Science/Mathematics Project is a 2-year graduate program leading to a master of education degree in science or mathematics edu- cation. The project links people working in industry, public schools, and the university to integrate work experience in science and mathematics with aca- demic study and leadership training. The project is supported by the local busi- ness community. The primary goal is to foster leadership skills among teachers of science and mathematics. Participants partake in leadership training institutes and seminars, a master of education program that includes advanced study in mathematics and science, a collegial team that includes an experienced science or mathematics teacher to answer questions and provide professional support, and a summer internship in a business or industry. Fellows are chosen on the basis of their leadership potential, teaching ability, and interpersonal skills. WEST VIRGINIA 182. Leadership Institute in Science-Technology-Society Education Pennsylvania State University; West Virginia University Contact: Peter Rubba, University Park, (814) 863-2937, FAX: (814) 863- 7602, Internet: par4@psuvm.psu.edu In August 1991, the National Science Foundation awarded a grant to Pennsylva- nia State University and West Virginia University to develop and support a cadre of science-technology-society (STS) teacher-leaders in rural central Pennsylva- nia and northern West Virginia middle and junior high schools. The two univer- sities developed a 3-week Leadership Institute in Science-Technology-Society Education at the University Park Campus of Pennsylvania State University. Through a combination of lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and hands-on activities, 30 participants addressed the sources and effects of global warming and developed curriculum units for their classrooms. In addition, they tried to identify the components of STS instruction that led students to take action on STS issues (acid rain, global warming, waste management, and species extinc- tion). The project ended in July 1995.

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PROFESSIONAL-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS BY LOCATION WISCONSIN 183. Biotechnology Inservice Program for Secondary Life Science Teachers and Agricultural-Education Teachers University of Wisconsin-River Falls Contact: Karen Klyczek, River Falls, (715) 425-3364, FAX: (715) 425- 3785, Internet: karen.k.klyczek@uwrf.edu 169 In response to a needs assessment of area high-school teachers, the University of Wisconsin-River Falls has been offering a 3-week workshop on life-science and agricultural education to increase biotechnology literacy and assist in the devel- opment of new classroom materials. Funded by money from the Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Education State Grant and the National Science Foun- dation, the program, now in its sixth year, encourages continuing activities among workshop participants during the school year. 184. Teachers as Change Agents: An Integrated Curriculum Cooperative Educational Service Agency 11 Contact: Juliette Vajgrt, Elmwood, (715) 986-2020, FAX: (715) 986-2040, Internet: n/a With funding from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, this project helps school districts in rural northwestern Wisconsin to develop an issue-based, rather than textbook-driven, K-12 biotechnology curriculum. The objectives are to design and carry out environmentally oriented biotechnology school-commu- nity projects in the schools, to foster leadership among teachers, and to support the districts' teachers in implementing the new curriculum. In addition, the project facilitator helps teachers to develop effective procedures for evaluating pilot-teaching strategies and secure input from area universities and private in- dustries. 185. Institute for Multicultural Science Education/Teacher to Teacher Program Center for Biology Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison Contact: Lisa Wachtel, Madison, (608) 262-5266, FAX: (608) 262-6801, Internet: Iwachtel@macc.wisc.edu With funding from the National Science Foundation and the University of Wis- consin-Madison (UWM), the UWM Center for Biology Education established the Institute for Multicultural Science Education in 1990. The institute's goals have been to provide K-12 teachers with opportunities to learn about the strengths and needs of minority-group students, to develop strategies for implementing a problem-solving approach to science teaching, to introduce and encourage coop

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170 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS erative-learning experiences among teachers and students, to recruit teams of teachers working at the same school (in addition to individuals) to the program, and to encourage the incorporation of new techniques into teachers' daily teach- ing strategies. To accomplish these goals, the institute offers a 5-year program made up of two 10-day summer sessions and numerous academic-year activities. Through curriculum-development activities, discussion, workshops, demonstra- tions, and lectures, the program emphasizes the importance of exploring issues of multicultural understanding and of teaching science as a process of investigation. 186. Science Workshops for Elementary and Middle School Teachers University of Wisconsin-Madison; Madison Education Extension Programs Contact: Linda Shriberg, Madison, (608) 262-4477, FAX: (608) 265-5813, Internet: shriberg@mail.soemadison.wisc.edu The partnership of the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education and Madison Education Extension Programs offers a number of workshops in the biological sciences for classroom and science teachers of K-12 students. All workshops have a science focus but cover a variety of formats, such as infusing science concepts across the curriculum (how to learn about science in mathemat- ics, language arts, social studies, and other subjects); meeting national and state guidelines in science education (e.g., becoming familiar with the Benchmarks for Science Literacy and Science for All Americans); exploring one science subject intensively (e.g., the rain forest, whales, the timber wolf, cranes, and other endan- gered species); tapping into science resources on the Internet (e.g., the Protein Databank, the National Library of Agriculture, and the Smithsonian Institution); learning about the research process in science (observation, hypotheses, investi- gation, and conclusions; how to write a science report; and tracking animals through radio telemetry); and general subjects in the biological sciences (e.g., environmental science, DNA and genetics, and biotechnology). The workshops also are offered to learning and curriculum coordinators, coordinators of pro- grams for talented and gifted children, biology and life-sciences teachers, and librarians. Generally, attendees do not need to have a science background to participate in the programs. 187. Wisconsin Fast Plants Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Contact: Coe Williams, Madison, (608) 263-2634, FAX: (608) 263-2626, Internet: fastplants@calshp.cals.wisc.edu or http://fastplants/cals.wisc.edu Funded primarily by the National Science Foundation, the Wisconsin Fast Plants program offers a nationwide professional-development program. Based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Department of Plant Pathology, the

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PROFESSIONAL-DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS BY LOCATION 171 program disseminates instructional materials on rapid-cycling Fast Plants devel- oped by a university research scientist for research purposes. The program spon- sors regional teams of teachers and scientists to lead workshops on the use of these plants for investigative studies in plant growth, life spirals, inheritance, ecology, and plant technology. Workshop goals include encouraging teachers to learn science by doing it themselves, helping them to make their own experi- ments with the low-cost and recyclable materials, and helping to foster in them a sense of ownership about their classroom science projects. Additional services include the availability of instructional materials, a biannual newsletter, trouble- shooting tips, slides and scripts, publications, and opportunities for networking among scientists and teachers at all levels. 188. Wisconsin Teacher Enhancement Program in Biology University of Wisconsin-Madison Contact: Ruth Owens, Madison, (608) 262-1006, FAX: (608) 262-2976, Internet: reowens@facstaff.wisc.edu Since 1985, the Wisconsin Teacher Enhancement Program in Biology, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has provided a summer institute for teachers at the elementary-, middle-, and high-school levels. The Wisconsin Teacher En- hancement Program in Biology: Summer Institute offers quality education in the biological sciences. Teachers are provided an opportunity to review and update their science education through modules offered in a variety of subjects, includ- ing human genetics; molecular and cell biology; plant, animal, and environmen- tal biology; and elementary science. Courses are offered in systemic-change issues, special education, and alcohol- and other drug-abuse issues. The summer institute offers a variety of 1- and 2-week modules during a 10-week period. All modules emphasize an inquiry-based, problem-solving approach to science. Ac- tivities developed by participants during each module reflect course content and can later be used in the teachers' classrooms to help to make biology exciting, relevant, and understandable for students. Teachers earn credits at the graduate level. *~189. BioNet Waunakee High School Contact: Lynn Gilchrist, Madison, (608) 265-3168, FAX: n/a, Internet: Igilchrist @ macc.wisc.edu Organized in 1991, BioNet aims to provide a forum for area biology teachers to meet statewide and share ideas and activities related to teaching biology and to establish communication and professional relationships with university biology teachers to see where other biology teachers work. BioNet, funded by a grant

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72 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS from the Center for Biology Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, meets four times per year at various high schools. Each of the 12 BioNet regions conduct two to four meetings per year. 190. The Wisconsin Society of Science Teachers Contact: Lynn Gilchrist, Madison, (608) 265-3168, FAX: n/a, Internet: Igilchrist @ macc.wisc.edu The Wisconsin Society of Science Teachers (WSST) is dedicated to the promo- tion and improvement of science education in Wisconsin. As the state science- teachers organization, it serves pre-K through grade 16 teachers. Membership numbers 2,000. This active organization provides teachers with the latest infor- mation in science education primarily through forums, newsletters, and an annual convention. It also has a foundation dedicated to the promotion of science educa- tion in Wisconsin.