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Appendix I BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND CONSULTANTS COMMITTEE MEMBERS ROBERT E. DICKINSON is deputy director of the Atmospheric Analysis and Prediction Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. He received a Ph.D. in 1966 in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has done research in atmospheric dynamics, radiative transfer, and climate modeling. He is a member of the NRC Committee on Atmospheric Sciences and was a member o f the NRC panels that authored the reports cited as NRC (1976b, 1979b). JAMES P. FRIEND is R.S. Hanson Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received an S.B. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1951 and an M.A. in 1953 and a Ph.D. in 1956 in chemistry from Columbia University. Dr. Friend is an expert in global cycles and geochemistry of trace substances in the atmosphere and climate impact assessments. He has worked for the Perkin-Elmer Corporation and Isotopes, Inc., and was a professor of atmospheric chemistry at New York University. Dr. Friend was a member of the three previous NRC committees that prepared the reports cited as NRC (1975; 1976a,b; 1979a,b). MAUREEN M. HENDERSON is associate vice president for Health Sciences at the University of Washington, Seattle. She received an MB.BS (Dunelm) in 1949 and a D.P.H. (Dunelm) in 1956. Dr. Henderson is a physician epidemiologist with a speciality in the epidemiology of chronic diseases. She has taught at St. Bartholemew's Hospital, London, the University of Maryland, and Johns Hopkins University and has served 335

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336 on numerous advisory and review committees for the government. She is a member of the National Cancer Advisory Board and of the Council of the Institute of Medicine. She served on the NRC committees that prepared the reports cited as NRC (1976a, 1979a). DONALD M. HUNTEN is professor of planetary science at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory of the University of Arizona. He received a Ph.D. in physics from McGill University in 1950. His research interests are the upper atmosphere of earth and other planets and spectroscopic instrumentation. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and was a member of the NRC committee that prepared the report cited as NRC (1975). JOHN JAGGER is a professor in the School of General Studies at the University of Texas at Dallas. He received a B.S. in 1949 in physics and a Ph.D. in 1954 in biophysics from Yale University. He is an expert on the effects of W. especially W -A, on bacteria, including photoreactivation, photoprotection, and effects on cell growth and membrane function. Dr. Jagger has worked at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and has taught at the Southwest Center for Advanced Studies, the University of Tennessee, Pennsylvania State University, and the University of Kyoto, Japan. He is a former editor of the journal Photochemistry and Photobiology. He has been a member and president of the NRC's U.S. National Committee for Photobiology. RICHARD M. KLEIN is professor of botany at the University of Vermont, Burlington. He received a B.S. in 1947, an M.S. in 1948, and a Ph.D. in 1951 in botany from the University of Chicago. His expertise is in the field of plant physiology, especially effects of W radiation on plant growth and development and potential economic impacts. He has also worked at the New York Botanical Garden. CHARLES H. KRUGER, JR., is professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University, where he conducts research in the dynamics of high-temperature gases and combustion processes. He received a Ph.D. in 1960 in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been a member of the Hearing Board of the San Francisco Bay Area Air Quality Management District since 1969, serving as chairman between 1971 and 1977, and is a member of the NRC Environmental Studies Board. In 1970 he was

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337 awarded a medal from the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics. MICHAEL B. McELROY is Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the Center for Earth and Planetary Physics at Harvard University. a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Queen's University, Belfast, He received in 1962 and was a physicist on the staff of Kitt Peak National Observatory before joining the faculty at Harvard. His research interests are in the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres. J OHN A. PARRISH is associate professor of dermatology at the Harvard Medical School and assistant dermatologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He received a B.A. in 1961 in political science from Duke University and an M.D. in 1965 from the Yale University School of Medicine. He has done both clinical work and research in photomedicine, especially the hazardous and therapeutic effects of light, including W , on human skin. He is director of the Wellman Laboratories and the Photomedicine Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. He served on the NRC's U.S. National Committee for Photobiology, is a councilor for the American society for Photobiology and a member of the Photobiology Task Force for the American Academy of Dermatology. HOWARD H. SELIGER holds a joint appointment as professor of biology in the Biology Department and the School of Hyg iene and Public Health at the Johns Hopk ins University, Baltimore, Maryland. He received a B.S. in 1943 from the City College of New York, an M.S. in 1948 from Purdue University, and a Ph.D. in 1954 in nhvsics from the University of Maryland. Dr. Seliger's fields of expertise include the study of mechanisms of bioluminescence and chemiluminescence, photoecology, marine phytoplankton ecology, and radiobiology. He was a physicist in the Radioactivity Section of the National Bureau of Standards before joining the Johns Hopkins University in 1960. He is the immediate past president of the American Society for Photobiology. RICHARD B. SETLOW is chairman of and senior biophysicist in the Biology Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. He recevied an A.B. in 1941 from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. in 1947 in from Yale University. He i s An expert in the , ~ _ _ - physi field of molecular biophysics, in particular, the , _

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338 effects of W radiation on biological systems, and has done extensive work on the DNA action spectrum and on DNA repair systems. Dr. Setlow has worked at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has taught at Yale University, the University of Tennessee, and the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and has directed the University of Tennessee Oak Ridge Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has served on numerous NRC committees, including the committee that prepared the report cited as NRC (1975) and the Panel to Review Statistics on Skin Cancer of the Committee on National Statistics. WILLIAM B. SISSON holds a joint appointment as plant physiologist at the USDA Jornada Experimental Range and on the graduate faculty of the Department of Animal and Range Sciences at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces. He received a B.S. in 1970 from Humbolt State University, an M.S. in 1972 from Texas Tech University, and a Ph.D. in 1975 from Utah State University. Dr. Sisson is a plant physiologist and is an expert on the effects of W on plants and ecosystems, especially photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. He has also done research at Utah State University. CONSULTANTS JAMES G. ANDERSON is Robert P. Burden Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at the Center for Earth and Planetary Physics at Harvard University. He received a Ph.D. in physics and astrogeophysics from the University of Colorado in 1970. His current research interests are in the development of techniques for measuring trace species in the troposphere and stratosphere and the application of these techniques to in situ observations of species important for ozon chemistry in the stratosphere. RALPH J. CICERONE is director of the Atmospheric e Chemistry and Aeronomy Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. He received a Ph.D. in physics and electrical engineering from the University of Illinois in 1970 and currently conducts theoretical research on the photochemistry of stratospheric ozone and experimental research on atmospheric trace gases. He is an editor of the

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339 Journal of Geophysical Research, a member of the NRC Committee on Atmospheric Sciences as well as co-chairman of that committee's Panel on Atmospheric Chemistry, a member of the Upper Atmosphere Committee of the American Meteorological Society, and a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and of the AAAS. JENNIFER A. LOGAN is research associate in atmospheric chemistry at the Center for Earth and Planetary Physics at Harvard University. She received a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in physical chemistry in 1975. Her current research focuses on theoretical modeling of the chemistry of the stratosphere and troposphere. HANS A. PANOFSKY is Evan Pugh Research Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at Pennsylvania State University. He was awarded a Ph.D. in astronomy by the University of California in 1941. His current research interests are in dynamic meteorology and micrometeorology. He was a member of the NRC panels that prepared the reports cited as NRC (1975, 1976a, 1979a). A. BARRIE PITTOCK is principal research scientist in the Division of Atmospheric Physics of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) near Melbourne, Australia. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Melbourne University and was a Fulbright scholar at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado in 1963-1964. Dr. Pittock is a member of the National Committee on Atmospheric Science of the Australian Academy of Science and of its subcommittee on the World Climate Research Program. His current research is in monitoring and causality of stratospheric change, solar influences on weather and climate, natural variations in climate, and human impact on climate. STEVEN C. WOFSY is associate professor of atmospheric chemistry at the Center for Earth and Planetary Physics at Harvard University. He was awarded a Ph.D. in chemistry by Harvard in 1971. He is currently conducting research in tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, including theoretical modeling of stratospheric ozone chemistry.

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