APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Julian Andelman, the committee's chair, is professor of Environmental Health in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, as well as professor of Civil Engineering at the School of Engineering at University of Pittsburgh. He received his A.B. in biochemical sciences from Harvard College and his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. His research focuses on the behavior of chemicals in treated and natural waters, and the transport of volatile chemicals from water to air in indoor systems, as well as the human exposures that result.

Herman Bouwer is chief engineer with the U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Dr. Bouwer received B.S. and M.S. degrees in land drainage and irrigation from the National Agricultural University of Wageningen, the Netherlands, and his Ph.D. in hydrology and agricultural water management from Cornell University. He is adjunct professor at Arizona State University and the University of Arizona. His research focuses on in sire measurement of hydraulic properties of soils, vadose zones, and aquifers; characterization of underground flow systems; renovation of sewage effluent by ground water recharge; effect of irrigated agriculture on ground water, and effect of ground water pumping on stream flow.

Randall Charbeneau is director at the Center for Research in Water Resources at the University of Texas-Austin, as well as Professor in the University's Department of Civil Engineering. He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in engineering from the University of Michigan, Oregon State University, and Stanford University, respectively. Dr. Charbeneau has served on several ground water research advisory panels, including one on ground water contamination



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Ground Water Recharge Using Waters of Impaired Quality APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Julian Andelman, the committee's chair, is professor of Environmental Health in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, as well as professor of Civil Engineering at the School of Engineering at University of Pittsburgh. He received his A.B. in biochemical sciences from Harvard College and his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. His research focuses on the behavior of chemicals in treated and natural waters, and the transport of volatile chemicals from water to air in indoor systems, as well as the human exposures that result. Herman Bouwer is chief engineer with the U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Dr. Bouwer received B.S. and M.S. degrees in land drainage and irrigation from the National Agricultural University of Wageningen, the Netherlands, and his Ph.D. in hydrology and agricultural water management from Cornell University. He is adjunct professor at Arizona State University and the University of Arizona. His research focuses on in sire measurement of hydraulic properties of soils, vadose zones, and aquifers; characterization of underground flow systems; renovation of sewage effluent by ground water recharge; effect of irrigated agriculture on ground water, and effect of ground water pumping on stream flow. Randall Charbeneau is director at the Center for Research in Water Resources at the University of Texas-Austin, as well as Professor in the University's Department of Civil Engineering. He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in engineering from the University of Michigan, Oregon State University, and Stanford University, respectively. Dr. Charbeneau has served on several ground water research advisory panels, including one on ground water contamination

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Ground Water Recharge Using Waters of Impaired Quality for the Geophysical Research Board of the National Research Council. His research interests include hazardous waste disposal and ground water transport modeling. Russell Christman is professor of environmental sciences at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Dr. Christman received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Florida. He has taught sanitary and civil engineering at the University of Washington, where he also served as Associate Professor of the Applied Sciences. His research focuses on the chemical structures of natural product organic materials in water; methods of organic analysis in water samples; and mechanisms of colloidal destabilization with hydrolysis products of aluminum III. James Crook is director of water reuse for the firm Black & Veatch. He was previously with Camp Dresser & McKee Inc. Prior to that he was with the California Department of Health Services, where he directed the department's water reclamation and reuse program. Dr. Crook has served on several water reuse advisory panels and has been an advisor to the National Sanitation Foundation, Pan American Health Organization, United Nations Development Programme, and U.S. Agency for International Development. He was the principal author of water muse guidelines published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and has assisted in the development of water reclamation and reuse criteria for several sates. Dr. Crook received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Massachusetts; he received his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Cincinnati. Anna Fan is chief, Pesticide and Environmental Toxicology Section, Office of Environmental Health and Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, State of California. She received her Ph.D. in toxicology from Utah Sate University. Dr. Fan has worked to develop water standards for the state. Her responsibilities include evaluating and establishing California's safe drinking water standards, conducting risk-based assessments of chemical contamination in various environmental media, and conducting epidemiological investigations of pesticide health effects. Dr. Fan chairs a public health working group and has worked on contaminants in drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley. She is a member of the Drinking Water Committee, Science Advisory Board, United States Environmental Protection Agency. She is also an adjunct professor at San Jose State University. Denise Fort is director of the Water Resources Administration Program at the University of New Mexico and a member of the faculty of the School of Law. Previously she was a consultant with the Natural Heritage Institute in California. She has served as attorney for the New Mexico Public Interest Group, the Southwest Research and Information Center, and the Taxation and Revenue Department of New Mexico. She was also Cabinet Secretary of the New Mexico Department of Finance and Administration where she was responsible for management of the state's budget, fiscal controls, public school and local govern-

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Ground Water Recharge Using Waters of Impaired Quality ment finance, capital bonding, and planning. She later became director of the Environmental Improvement Division of New Mexico, where she was responsible for the administration of the State's environmental laws. She received her B.S. from St. John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico and her J.D. from the Catholic University of America. Wilford Gardner has recently retired as Dean, College of Natural Resources, University of California at Berkeley. He received a Ph.D. in physics from Iowa State College in 1953. Dr. Gardner was previously with the Department of Soils, Water, and Engineering at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He has been a National Science Foundation senior fellow at Cambridge University and a Fulbright lecturer, University of Ghent. Dr. Gardner is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Water Science and Technology Board. His research has been in measurement of soil moisture by neutron scattering; soil physics; movement of fluids in porous media; soil-water plant relations; soil salinity; plant biophysics; and environmental physics. William Jury is professor of soil physics and chair of the Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences at the University of California-Riverside. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin in 1973. Dr. Jury's principal research interests are measurement and modeling of organic and inorganic chemical movement and reactions in field soils; development and testing of organic chemical screening models; spatial variability of soil physical and chemical properties; and assessing volatilization losses of organic compounds. David Miller is president, CEO, and chairman of the board for the firm Geraghty and Miller, Inc. He received a B.A. and M.S. in geology from Colby College and Columbia University in 1953. He is well know as an expert in applied ground water hydrology, and his career includes service with the USGS and consulting firms. Mr. Miller was a founding member of the WSTB. He has worked on more than 200 projects for industries and utilities. He is now working on treating contaminated ground water at Superfund sites. Robert Pitt is associate professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department and the Environmental Health Science Department at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He received his B.S. in engineering science from Humboldt State University in 1970, his M.S.C.E. in environmental engineering/hydraulic engineering from San Jose State University in 1971, and his Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1987. His principal research interests include investigating urban runoff pollutant effects, sources and controls. Henry, Vaux, Jr. is Associate Vice President-Agricultural and Natural Resource Programs for the University of California systemwide. He previously served as Director of the University of California Water Resources Center and as a professor of resource economics at the University of California, Riverside. His principal research interests are the economics of water use and water quality. Prior to joining the University he worked at the Office of Management and

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Ground Water Recharge Using Waters of Impaired Quality Budget and was on the staff of the National Water Commission. He received a Ph.D. in natural resource economics from the University of Michigan in 1973. John Vecchioli is a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division in Tallahassee, Florida, and currently serves as Chief of the Florida District Program. Previously, he was responsible for quality assurance of all technical aspects of ground water programs in Florida. He was project chief of a study of hydraulic and geochemical aspects of waste injection in Florida. Also, while with the Survey on Long Island, New York, he was project chief for a study involved in planning and supervision of a multidisciplinary effort to evaluate the hydraulic and geochemical impact of artificial recharge of treated wastewater through injection wells. Mr. Vecchioli received his B.S. and M.S. in geology from Rutgers University in 1956 and 1957, respectively. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union, Geological Society of America, National Ground Water Association, American Institute of Professional Geologists, International Association of Hydrogeologists, and Sigma Xi. Marylynn Yates is associate professor of environmental microbiology with the Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Riverside. Dr. Yates received her B.S. in nursing from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, her M.S. in chemistry from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and her Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from the University of Arizona. She is a member of the American Waterworks Association technical working group looking at EPA's disinfection rule. Her research interests include the fate of microorganisms in soil, surface water, ground water, and wastewater treatment; modeling the fate and transport of microorganisms in the subsurface; ground water contamination; and waterborne disease outbreaks.