TABLE 3.9 Partial List of Incompatible Chemicals (Reactive Hazards)

Substances in the left hand column should be stored and handled so that they cannot accidentally contact corresponding substances in the right hand column under uncontrolled conditions.

Acetic acid

Chromic acid, nitric acid, peroxides, permanganates

Acetic anhydride

Hydroxyl-containing compounds such as ethylene glycol, perchloric acid

Acetone

Concentrated nitric and sulfuric acid mixtures, hydrogen peroxide

Acetylene

Chlorine, bromine, copper, silver, fluorine, mercury

Alkali and alkaline earth metals, such as sodium, potassium, lithium, magnesium, calcium, powdered aluminum

Carbon dioxide, carbon tetrachloride, other chlorinated hydrocarbons (also prohibit the use of water, foam, and dry chemical extinguishers on fires involving these metals—dry sand should be employed)

Ammonia (anhydrous)

Mercury, chlorine, calcium hypochlorite, iodine, bromine, hydrogen fluoride

Ammonium nitrate

Acids, metal powders, flammable liquids, chlorates, nitrites, sulfur, finely divided organics, combustibles

Aniline

Nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide

Bromine

Ammonia, acetylene, butadiene, butane, other petroleum gases, sodium carbide, turpentine, benzene, finely divided metals

Calcium oxide

Water

Carbon, activated

Calcium hypochlorite, other oxidants

Chlorates

Ammonium salts, acids, metal powders, sulfur, finely divided organics, combustibles

Chromic acid and chromium trioxide

Acetic acid, naphthalene, camphor, glycerol, turpentine, alcohol, other flammable liquids

Chlorine

Ammonia, acetylene, butadiene, butane, other petroleum gases, hydrogen, sodium carbide, turpentine, benzene, finely divided metals

Chlorine dioxide

Ammonia, methane, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide

Copper

Acetylene, hydrogen peroxide

Fluorine

Isolate from everything

Hydrazine

Hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid, any other oxidant

Hydrocarbons (benzene, butane, propane, gasoline, turpentine, etc.)

Fluorine, chlorine, bromine, chromic acid, peroxides

Hydrocyanic acid

Nitric acid, alkalis

Hydrofluoric acid (anhydrous)

Ammonia (aqueous or anhydrous) Hydrogen fluoride



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