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Appendix A Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations or ~ he following associations and government organizations are involved in science education re- form and offer assistance relevant to elementary science teaching. American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 1333 H St., N.W., Washington, DC 20005; (202) 32~6400. The largest general scientific organization in the country and the largest federation of scientific societies in the world, with nearly 300 affiliated science societies and organizations. Programs spon- sorecl by the AAAS Directorate for Education and Human Re- sources include the Annual Forum for School Science; Collabora- tion for Equity in Science; radio programs "Science Update" and "Kinetic City Super Crew" (the latter with teacher's guicle, home activities, and call-in); and project SLIC (Science Linkages in the Community) to train people to teach science. Books in many fields of science and science education, including IDEAAAS: Sourcebook for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education (3rd ed.), en cl the newsletter Science Education News. Project 2061, a long-term science education reform initiative for grades K-12, offers the following publications: Science for All Americans, on scientific literacy; Benchmarks for Science Literacy, a cur- riculum design toot defining expectations for science knowleclge for grades 2,5,8, and 12; en c! other books and computer-based ma- terials on curriculum design, exemplary resources, and research. 196

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Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations American Chemical Society, Il55 16th St., N.W., Washington, DC 20036; (202) 8724600. Principal professional society of chemists, with 145,000 members. Operation Chemistry (OpChem), funcled by the National Science Foundation, sponsors two-week workshops for teacher-training teams and subsequent workshops nationwide for thousands of teachers. Offers Community Science Grants for children en c! aclults to explore hancis-on science as teams. Publishes curriculum guidelines, supplemental activities, aucliovisual materials, and WonderScience (activities magazine for upper-elementary students and aclults working together, published jointly with the American Institute of Physics); produces videos and booklets supporting chemists who go into the classroom, a newsletter, and posters. American Geological Institute, 4220 King St., Alexandria, VA 22302; (703) 379-2480. Fecleration of more than 25 professional, scientific, and technical associations in the earth sciences. Publications include Adtrentures in Geology, a text-based approach to geology en cl science teaching for grades K-3 and 4-6; en cl Earth Science Content Guidelines, a re- port, with activities, to guide the inclusion of earth science content in the K-12 curriculum. Publications include ideas en c! activities in the areas of solid earth, water, air, ice, life, and earth in space. American Indian Science and Engineering Society, 1630 30th St., Suite 301, Boulder, CO 80301; (303) 492-8658. Society of American Indian and non-Inclian students, scientific professionals, en cl interested corporations that provides programs for American Indian students and their teachers to enhance stu- clent interest and abilities in science. Works to link hands-on, stu- dent-centered science to culture and community with uniquely In- dian programs and curricula; science focus on biology, human biology, environmental sciences, and science/technology and so- ciety. Programs include workshops at society meetings, technical assistance, information hotline, and National American Indian 197

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Appendix A Science Fair. Publications include curriculum units, teacher's guides, audiovisual and computer-based materials, Winds of Change Magazine for students, and a newsletter. American Institute of Physics, American Center for Physics, One Physics Ellipse, College Park, MD 20740-3843; (301) 209-3100. Organization of 10 professional societies (totaling 75,000 mem- bers) and 19 affiliated societies in physics and related fields; con- cernecI with collecting en c! disseminating information about physics, physics education, en cl the history of physics. Publications include Physics Education News, a semimonthly electronic newslet- ter, en c! WonderScience, an activities magazine for upper-elementary students and adults working together. WonderScience is publishecl jointly with the American Chemical Society. American Meteorological Society, 1701 K St., N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20006; (202) 46~5728. Professional scientific society of more than Il,000 members; fo- cused on meteorology, climatology, and oceanography. Programs include two national projects Project ATMOSPHERE (meteorol- ogy and climatology) and the newer Maury Project (oceanogra- phy) to train K-12 teachers in these areas. Training includes one-week institutes for master teachers en cl monitoring of subse- quent workshops nationwide in which the master teachers train other teachers. Publications include teacher's guides, materials, hands-on activities solely for use in the two projects; audiovisual and computer-based materials; and a newsletter. American Physical Society, American Center for Physics, One Physics Ellipse, College Park, MD 20740; (301) 209-3200. Principal professional society for physicists and physics students, with more than 40,000 members; focused primarily on physics and on physics education. Its Teacher-Scientist Alliance, a national co- operative effort operated with the Axnerican Association of Physics Teachers, is designed to mobilize scientists in support of efforts 198

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Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations aimed at systemic reform of elementary science education. Scien- tists from areas with school districts engaged in systemic reform are recruited, taught about reform issues, and expected to recruit and teach other scientists in their areas. The Annenberg/CPB Math and Science Project, 901 E St., N.W. Washington, DC 20004; (202) 879-9600. A project working in partnership with eclucation, policy, en cl civic organizations to promote reform in math and science education. Funds a wide range of programs, including Project PRISM, an ex- tensive community outreach campaign conducted en c! coorclinat- ed by the National Urban League; Science Images, a series of vicleo- cassettes focusing on eight elementary and middle school teachers teaching a specific science concept, pro(luced in collaboration with the North Central Regional Eclucational Laboratory; Private Uni- verse Teacher Workshops, a series of videocassettes demonstrating how students' preconceived ideas can create barriers to learning, produced in collaboration with Harvarc3-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; and The Synergy Project, a series of videocassettes on the information needed for a strategic workshop for senior-level policymakers en cl educational administrators, proclucec3 in colitic oration with the Education Commission of the States. Each vicleo- cassette program comes with print materials, such as a source book, fact sheets, a viewer's guide, or a workshop guide. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD), 1250 N. Pitt St., Alexandria, VA 22314-1403; (703) 549-9110. Educational association with more than 190,000 members. Dissem- inates information on educational research and practice and con- clucts professional development institutes of one to three clays in major U.S. cities. Publications include ASCD CurricuZum Handbook, Brown's Directories of Instructional Programs (annual guicle to com- mercial materials), Only the Best (annual guide to computer-based materials), Curriculum Materials Directory (annual guide to noncom- mercial materials), Educational Leadership (journal), ASCD books, and Hands-On Elementary Science (materials for 20 workshops). 199

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Appendix A Association of Science Materials Centers, c/o Science and Social Sciences Resource Specialist, Mesa Public Schools, 143 South Alma School Rd., Mesa, AZ 85120-1096; (602) 898-7815. Organization whose membership is made up of managers of (lis- trictwide or multidistrict science materials support centers. Pro- vides information and technical assistance on how to establish and sustain a central science materials support center. Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC), 1025 Vermont Ave., N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005; (202) 783-7200. WorIdwicle organization of science centers and museums, plane- tariums, space theaters, nature centers, aquariums, natural history museums, children's museums, and other facilities, with more than 270 members in the United States and Canada. Creates! and operates YouthALIVE, a program for underservecl adolescents (grades 5-12) clelivered by nearly 50 museums that are members of either ASTC or the Association of Youth Museums. Newsletter, directory of programs, and "how-to" manual are available. The program provides hands-on enrichment programs with structured opportunities for grades 5-8, such as clubs, camps, classes, work- shops, and field trips, to heighten interest and involvement of tar- geted aclolescents in the physical sciences. Museums design their own programs, often working with community-based organiza- tions, en c! seek minimum involvement of 120 hours per year for two or three years for each student. ASTC provides technical assis- tance and professional development for museum staff members. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS), Pikes Peak Re- search Park, 5415 Mark Dabling Blv6., Colorado Springs, CO 80918-3842; (719) 531-5550. Organization cledicated to leadership in science education through the design, development, en cl implementation of cur- riculum materials. Extensive programs and publications, including curriculum materials for K-12, publications on science education reform, and a newsletter. 200

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Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations Council for Elementary Science International (CESI), c/o Dr. Betty Burchett, CESI Membership Chair, 212 Townsend Hall, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211; (314) 882-4831. Professional organization with 1,600 members and a Division Affili- ate of the National Science Teachers Association, dedicated to stim- ulating, improving, and coordinating science teaching (grades pre- K-8~. Publications include source books for teaching elementary science, research monographs on teaching science, and file sheets. Council of State Science Supervisors, c/o Dr. Thomas Keller, Council President, Maine Department of Education, 23 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333-0023; (207) 287-5920. Organization consisting of a science supervisor/specialist/consul- tant from each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Guam. Coordinates members' work in creating curricu- Jum guidelines, frameworks, and standards within their respective areas, as well as information dissemination efforts. Education Development Center, 55 Chapel St., Newton, MA 02160; (619) 969-7100. International education research and development organization founded in 195S, with a Center for Learning, Teaching, and Tech- nology among its subdivisions. Publications include Insights, a com- prehensive K-6 science curriculum. Provides technical assistance to Statewide Systemic Initiatives in 24 states and Puerto Rico and as- sists several school districts in implementing systemic reform. Eclucational Equity Concepts, 114 E. 32nd St., Suite 701, New York, NY10016; (212) 725-1803. National organization dedicated to producing educational pro- grams and materials free from bias concerning gender, race and ethnicity, and disability and income. Organization has developed a physical science activity program (for pre-K-3), with hands-on curriculum materials, audiovisual materials, and facilitator note 201

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Appendix ~ book. Staff development and parent training are provicled. Also has developed a physical science curriculum (for grades K-2 or K-3), a curriculum guide, and a staff development guide. Eisenhower National Cleannghouse for Mathematics and Science Educations The Ohio State University, 1929 Kenny Rd., Columbus, OH 43210-1079; (614) 292-7784. Funded through the U.S. Department of Education and aciminis- tered by the Ohio State University, the Clearinghouse aims to pro- vide K-12 teachers with a central source of information on science and mathematics curriculum materials. Maintains a comprehensive collection of curriculum resources in many formats print, audio, multimedia, video, kits, anct games. Publishes a detailed catalog, ENC Online, available via modem (~-800-362-4448), TeInet anti Go- pher (enc.org), and World Wide Web (http://www.enc.org). Many other products and services are available in print and electronic format, including a database of federal programs, electronic visits to particular schools, and a reference service. Information is also available via e-mai! (info~enc.org). ERIC Cleannghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Env~ronmen- tal Education, The Ohio State University, 1929 Kenny Rd., Colum- bus, OH 43210-1080; (614) 292-6717, (800) 27~0462, (800) LET ERIC (for new users). Clearinghouse and international information network, 1 of 16 in the ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) system, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Education. ERIC collects, cat- alogs, and provides access to educational materials; offers reference and referral services; produces bibliographic information; and main- tains an extensive database of reports, curricular and instructional materials, evaluations, en cl information on programs, practices, and policies in science, mathematics, and environmental education. Ac- cessible and searchable on CD-ROM or over the Internet, through e- mai] (ericse~osu.edu), Gopher (gopher.ericse.ohio-state.eclu), and the WorIcl Wide Web (http://www.ericse.ohio-state.edu). 202

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Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations Geological Society of America, P.O. Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301- 9140; (303) 447-2020. Professional scientific society with more than 16,000 members. Sponsors Partners for Excellence Program (PEP), a national net- work of people committed to enhancing science education for chil- dren and fostering collaborations and partnerships between teach- ers and scientists. Offers sessions for teachers at the annual meeting and free PEP membership for teachers. Programs managed by PEP include a national database of scientist partners (for grades K-12), scientist mentors, and tours for students of the society's facility. High-Scope Educational Foundation, 600 N. River St., Ypsilanti, MT 48198-2898; (313) 485-2000. Research, development, training, and public advocacy organiza- tion focused on bringing inquiry-centered science to grades K-3. Conducts K-3 workshop sessions at meetings and week-Ion" K-3 science workshops. Produces a teacher's manual that includes K-3 . . . student activities. Institute for Chemical Education, University of Wisconsin, De- partment of Chemistry, I 101 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706; (608) 262-3033. National organization based at the University of Wisconsin at Madi- son, with a network of field centers and affiliates across the country devoted to helping teachers at all grade levels (kindergarten through college) revitalize science education. Offers two-week work- shops at various regional sites, four-week workshops in Madison, summer fellowships, and Chem Camps for students (grades 5-8~. Publishes instructional materials for teachers, kits, and a newsletter. Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Centennial Dr., Berkeley, CA 94720; (510) 642-5132. Science center involved in research in science and mathematics education, teacher training, and curriculum development. Exten 203

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Appendix A ive programs en c! publications, including two curriculum proj- ects Great Explorations in Math and Science en cl the Full Option Science System. National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST), /o Dr. John R. Staver, NARST Executive Secretary, Center for Sci- ence Education, 219 Bluemont Hall, Kansas State University, Man- hattan, KS 66506; (913) 532-6294. Professional association of more than 1,000 members worldwide designed to improve science teaching through research. HoIcls an annual convention with more than 200 research papers. Publica- tions inclucle Journal of Research in Science Teaching ancl a newsletter. National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1509 16th St., N.W., Washington, DC 20036; (800) 424-2460. Association of 75,000 professional educators and others involves] in preschool and primary school education. Publishes more than 100 books, monographs, and other materials (catalog available) on early childhood education and the journal Young Children. National Association of Biology Teachers, ~ 1250 Roger Bacon Dr. No. 19, Reston, VA 22090-5202; (703) 471-1134. Professional society of more than 7,000 biology educators and ad- ministrators representing all grade levels. Offers teacher training and professional development, builds alliances between scientists and teachers, promotes hands-on investigative biology, and devel- ops curriculum and science policy. Publications include mono- graphs and special publications, The American Biology Teacher (mag- azine), a newsletter, en c! a catalog of materials. National Association of Elementary School Principals, 1615 -Duke St., Alexandria, VA 22314; (703) 68~3345. Organization serving 26,000 elementary and middle school prin- cipals in the United States and Canada, with an affiliate in every 204

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Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations state. Publishes the Principal (a magazine), a newsletter, and other publications. National Center for Improving Science Education, 2000 L St., N.W., Suite 603, Washington, DC 20036; (202) 467-0652. Division of The NETWORK, Inc., of Andover, Massachusetts, an organization Replicated to science education reform. Provides guidance for eclucational policyrnakers, curriculum developers, and practitioners by synthesizing findings in policy studies, re- search reports, and exemplary practices and by transforming them into practical resources, with one subject area selectee! each year. Offers workshops by technical assistance teams. Publications include curriculum guidelines, guidelines for policymakers, infor- mation for parents, books, and monographs. National Center for Research on Teacher Learning, Michigan State University, College of Education, 116 Erickson Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824-1034; (514) 355-9302. Research center supported by the U.S. Department of Education. Conducts research on how teachers learn to teach and engage stu- dents in active learning, with some projects specifically focused on science and mathematics. National Center for Science Teaching and Learning, The Ohio State University, 1929 Kenny Rd., Columbus, OH 4321~1015; (614) 292-3339. Research center supported by the U.S. Department of Education. Conducts research on noncurricular factors, such as organization- al en cl technological issues, that affect science students and teach- ers (grades K-12) . National Network for Science and Technology, 6H Berkey Hall, Michi- gan State University, East Lansing, MI 488211111; (517) 355 0180. Network of land-grant universities, Cooperative Extension Sys- tems, and other organizations in all 50 states concerned with chil 205

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Appendix A dren, youth, and families at risk. Promotes science en c! technolo- gy literacy. Services include technical and program assistance for extension faculty and collaborators to develop and implement ef- fective programs, national en cl regional training, research and de- velopment, en cl maintenance of an electronic clearinghouse. For further information, contact by e-maiT (nnst~mes.umn.eclu) or Gopher en cl TeInet (gopher-cyfernet.mes.umn.edu). National PIA National Congress of Parents and Teachers, 330 N. Wabash St., Suite 2100, Chicago, 11~ 60611-3604; (312) 670-6782. Organization cleclicatecl to bringing parents, teachers, students, principals, and administrators together with the goal of involving the community in school activities. Works on child advocacy legis- lation through the Office of Governmental Relations in Washing- ton, D.C. Publications include Looking in on Your School: A Workbook for Improving Public Education, National PTA Directory (quarterly), PTA Handbook, PTA Today, What's Happening in Washington (bi- monthly), and a newsletter. National Research Council (NRC), Center for Science, Mathemat- ics, and Engineering Education, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washing- ton, DC 20418;~202) 33~2353. NRC is the operating arm of three honorary academies: the Na- tional Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineer- ing, and the Institute of Medicine. NRC's primary function is ad- vising the federal government on science anti technology policy. It has become increasingly active in efforts to improve science edu- cation en cl has been a leader in the ~levelopment of standards for precollege science education, publishing the National Science Edu- cation Standards in 1995. NRC's Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education is concerned with curriculum cLevel- opment and review; educational policy; research, assessments and evaluation; K-12 policy and practice; and postseconclary policy and practice. The National Science Eclucation Standarcis project has a comprehensive outreach strategy to support national, state, and local implementation of the Stanciards through leadership 206

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Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations and resource development, partnerships and networks, and tar- getec3 symposia and workshops. The National Science Resources Center, a joint program of the National Academy of Sciences and the Smithsonian Institution, is concerned with reforming science education and producing resources for teaching science. Project RISE (Regional Initiatives in Science Eclucation) provides scien- tists and engineers with information and resources to assist them in contributing effectively to K-12 science education partnerships. National Science Education Leadership Association, P.O. Box 5556, Arlington, VA 22205; (703) 5218646. A I,200-member association of chairpersons, department heads, science supervisors, coorclinators, and other leaclers in science ed- ucation reform. The organization's mission is to improve science education through leadership development. Sponsors minicon- ferences and leadership institutes. Publishes Science Leadership Trend Notes, NSELA Handbook, and the Science Educator Journal) . National Science Foundation, Directorate for Education and Human Resources, 4201 Wilson BIv5., Arlington, VA 22230; (703) 30~1600. The Directorate for Eclucation en c! Human Resources of the Na- tional Science Foundation, an independent fecleral agency, is a major force in science education reform. The Division of Elemen- tary, Secondary, and Informal Education is concerned with cur- riculum development and teacher enhancement in science, math- ematics, and engineering. The Division of Human Resources Development is concerned with broadening the participation of people in unclerrepresented groups in science, mathematics, and engineering. The Division of Undergracluate Education is con- cerned with teacher preparation. The Office of Systemic Reform manages three large-scale reform projects: the Rural Systemic Ini- tiatives, Statewide Systemic Initiatives, and Urban Systemic Initia- tives. The Rural Systemic Initiatives Program supports efforts to make systemic improvements in science, mathematics, and tech- nology education in rural, economically disaclvantagecl regions. The Statewide Systemic Initiatives Program supports comprehen 207

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Appendix A ive, systemic, statewide efforts to change educational systems and improve science, mathematics, and technology education. The Urban Systemic Initiatives Program supports comprehensive, sys- temic reform efforts in science, mathematics, and technology ed- ucation in large urban school systems. National Science Resources Center, Smithsonian Institution, MRC 502, Arts and Industries BIdg., Rm. 1201, Washington, DC 20560; (202) 357-2555. Organization sponsored jointly by the National Academy of Sci- ences and the Smithsonian Institution to contribute to the im- provement of science education in the nation's schools. Conducts workshops at National Science Teachers Association and other meetings and holds two annual Leadership Institutes to train teams across the country on science education reform issues and methods. Publications include Science and Technology for Chil- dren, a series of 24 core curriculum units (grades 1-6) in the phys- ical, life, and earth sciences and design technology; Resources for Teaching Elementary School Science and projected companion vol- umes for middle and high schools; Science for All Children: A Guide to Improving Elementary Science Education in Your School District; and a newsletter. National Science Teachers Association, 1840 Wilson BIvd., Arling- ton, VA 22201-3000; (703) 243-7100. Organization committed to improving science education at all levels (pre-K through college), with a membership of 52,000, in- cluding science teachers, supervisors, administrators, scientists, and business and industry representatives. Holds one national and three regional conferences per year; certifies science teachers in eight teaching-level and discipline-area categories; has a computer bulletin board, an employment registry, nearly 20 award programs for teachers, and award programs for students; and gives educa- tional tours. Publications include Science and Children (a maga- zine), NSTA Reports! (a newspaper), curriculum units, supplemen- tary activities, and other instructional materials and publications. 208

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Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations National Staff Development Council, P.O. Box 240, Oxford, OH 45056; (513) 523-6029. Organization responsible for providing assistance and support to local school district staff responsible for the administration, su- pervision, and coordination of professional development pro- grams. Promotes public policy favorable to the development of comprehensive districtwide professional development programs and provides information on new professional development mod- els, theories of adult learning, planning and funding of district- based programs, and relevant research. Publications include The Developer (a newsletter) and journal of Staff Development. Northwest EQUALS, FAMILY SCIENCE, Portland State Universi ty, P.O. Box 1491, Portland, OR 97201-1491; (503) 725-3045. . Regional site for the EQUALS and FAMILY MATH programs pro- duced by EQUALS of Berkeley, California, and the developer and national disseminator of FAMTLY SCIENCE, a national outreach program designed to teach science by having children (grades K-S) and parents learn and enjoy science together; modeled after FAMILY MATH and EQUALS, FAMILY SCIENCE addresses the underrepresentation of women and ethnic and racial minorities in the sciences by demonstrating the role science plays in daily life, schooling, and future work. Publications include FAMILY SCI- ENCE, a book about implementing the program. Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Smithsonian In- stitution, Arts and Industries Bldg., Rrn. 1163, Washington DC 20560; (202) 357-2425. The Smithsonian Institution's central office for precollege educa- tion, drawing on the entire Smithsonian complex of museums, ex- hibitions, collections, and staff expertise to create a range of ma- terials and programs. Programs include summer seminars for teachers and Smithsonian On-line on the Internet. Publications include supplemental curriculum materials, "Mystery at the Muse- um" (a video game), Art to Zoo (a journal), and a newsletter. 209

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Appendix A School Science and Mathematics Association, Department of Cur- riculum and Foundations, Bloomsburg University, 400 E. Second Let__ Rloomshilr~. PA 17815-1301; (7171 389-4915. _ _. ~ ~ ~ 7 Organization for science en cl mathematics teachers (elementary science through college) emphasizing integration of science and mathematics. Publications include curriculum units emphasizing science-mathematics integration, Topics for Teachers (a monograph series), Classroom Activities (a monograph series), School Science and Mathematics (a journal), en c! a newsletter. Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, 99 Alexander Dr., P.O. Box 13975, Research Triangle Park, NC 22709; (S00) 243-6534. Inter(lisciplinary honor society of more than 90,000 research sci- entists and engineers affiliated with some 500 local Sigma XI groups. Programs available through local Sigma Xi groups include teacher-scientist partnerships, speakers bureaus, classroom demonstrations, curriculum clevelopment with teachers, sponsor- ship of science fairs, lab visits for students, and scientist mentors for students. Publications from Society headquarters inclucle Sci- entists and Science Education (annual report on the activities of the local groups), brochures to promote scientist-teacher partnerships and scientist involvement in reform efforts, and names anct acI- dresses of the officers of local Sigma Xi groups. Publications and other materials from local groups include curriculum guidelines and units, audiovisual and computer-basecI materials, en c! lab equipment and supplies for loan or as a gift. Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Sci- ence, Applied Sciences, Trailer #5, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064; (408) 459-4272. Society of 600 professionals in science and education striving to increase the participation of Latinos and Native Americans in science. Programs include teacher workshops at annual meet- ing. Publications inclucle a newsletter, with a section on K-12 programs. 210

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Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations TERC, 2067 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02140; (617) 547-0430; e-mail: communications~terc.edu. Nonprofit education research and clevelopment organization fo- cused on science en c! mathematics learning and teaching. Pro- grams include The Hub, an electronic source of materials en c! in- formation. Publications en c! electronic materials inclucle National Geographic Kids Network, cleveloped with the National Geo- graphic Society; LabNet, an electronic community of elementary and secondary teachers that fosters science en cl mathematics teaching; Tabletop Junior, software for visualization in (lata collec- tion en cl analysis; Hands On! (periodical on science, math, and technology education); and publications on telecommunications. Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education, 5112 Berwyn Rcl., College Park. MD 20740-4129: (3011 220-0870. ~, in. in. Coalition with representation from more than 100 member orga- nizations, inclucling business, industry, labor, scientific and engi- neering societies, education associations, anti government agen- cies. Works to link national science education reform efforts with local schools and school districts. Organization promotes colIabo- rations and partnerships between teachers and volunteer scientists through several hunclred action groups and alliances. Publications include Guide for Building an Alliance anct Guide for Planning a Vol- unteer Program, both of which acIdress science, mathematics, and technology education; numerous reports on reform efforts, state and federal programs, and other issues in science education; and a newsletter. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Enprovement, 555 NewJersey Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20208; (202) 219-2050. An office of the U.S. Department of Education that supports re- search and disseminates information. This office sponsors 10 Eisenhower Regional Mathematics and Science Eclucation Con- sortia, which provide information, technical assistance, and train 211

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Appendix A ing to states, schools, en c! teachers to help improve mathematics and science programs and adapt and use exemplary instructional materials, teaching methods, curricula, and assessment tools. Lo- cated in Andover, Massachusetts; Aurora, Colorado; Austin, Texas; Charleston, West Virginia; Honolulu, Hawaii; Montpelier, Ver- mont; Oak Brook, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Portland, Oregon; and Tallahassee, Floricla. Also sponsors the National As- sessment of Education Progress, which measures educational achievement of students in gracles 4, S. and 12, and, for science, uses a hancis-on task and portfolio. Other programs include the National Diffusion Network, a system for disseminating more than 70 programs, products, en cl processes in mathematics, science, ant! technology education, and 10 Regional Eclucational I~abora- tories that clo applied research and development in the areas of educational programs, materials, and professional development. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Sec- ondary Education, 400 MarylancI Ave., S.W., Washington, DC 20208; (202) 401-0113. An office of the U.S. Department of Education supporting ele- mentary and secondary education through programs for com- pensatory education, school improvement, and special student populations; the Eisenhower Mathematics en cl Science Education State Formula Grants Program; and the Christa McAuTiffe Fellow- shin Program for outstanding teachers. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Sec- ondary Education, School Effectiveness Division, 600 Tndepen- dence Ave . S.W.. Portals 4500. Washington, DC 20202-6140; (202) ~ . , 260-2666. Division in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education that operates the Eisenhower Professional Development State Grants Program, which supports teacher enhancement programs via state educational agencies. Involved in both in-service and pre . . service training. 212

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Professional Associations and U.S. Government Organizations U.S. Department of the Intenor, National Park Service, P.O. Box 37127, Suite 560, Washington, DC 20013-7127; (202) 523-5270. The National Park Service's Parks as Classrooms Program ar- ranges workshops for teachers at more than 270 sites of the Na- tional Park Service to encourage building curricula around Na- tional Park resources; many sites have workshops focused at least . . in part on science. ~ 1 2