APPENDIX C Biographical Sketches

LINCOLN E. MOSES (Chair) is professor emeritus (active) in the Department of Health Research and Policy, Division of Biostatistics, at Stanford University. He has had joint appointments in the Statistics Department and the Medical School since 1952. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the American Statistical Association. His research interests lie principally in social and biological applications of statistics. Major recent application areas include AIDS policy and meta-analysis of diagnostic tests for HIV infection and for other diseases. From 1987 to 1980 he served at the assistant secretary level leading the statistics arm of the U.S. Department of Energy. He has an A.B. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University.

RONALD S. BROOKMEYER is professor in the Department of Biostatistics at The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, with a joint appointment in the Department of Epidemiology. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin. He has authored over 70 scientific articles and books in biostatistics, epidemiologic methods, and AIDS and is the coauthor of the book entitled AIDS Epidemiology : A Quantitative Approach. His research has included statistical methods in epidemiologic studies of AIDS. He was one of the developers of the back-calculation method that is widely used for estimating and projecting the size of the epidemic. In 1992, he was awarded the Spiegelman gold medal by the



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Preventing HIV Transmission: The Role of Sterile Needles and Bleach APPENDIX C Biographical Sketches LINCOLN E. MOSES (Chair) is professor emeritus (active) in the Department of Health Research and Policy, Division of Biostatistics, at Stanford University. He has had joint appointments in the Statistics Department and the Medical School since 1952. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the American Statistical Association. His research interests lie principally in social and biological applications of statistics. Major recent application areas include AIDS policy and meta-analysis of diagnostic tests for HIV infection and for other diseases. From 1987 to 1980 he served at the assistant secretary level leading the statistics arm of the U.S. Department of Energy. He has an A.B. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. RONALD S. BROOKMEYER is professor in the Department of Biostatistics at The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, with a joint appointment in the Department of Epidemiology. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin. He has authored over 70 scientific articles and books in biostatistics, epidemiologic methods, and AIDS and is the coauthor of the book entitled AIDS Epidemiology : A Quantitative Approach. His research has included statistical methods in epidemiologic studies of AIDS. He was one of the developers of the back-calculation method that is widely used for estimating and projecting the size of the epidemic. In 1992, he was awarded the Spiegelman gold medal by the

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Preventing HIV Transmission: The Role of Sterile Needles and Bleach American Public Health Association for contributions to health statistics. His committee service includes the Committee on National Statistics and a committee on statistical issues in AIDS research of the National Research Council, as well as the clinical research subcommittee of the AIDS Research Advisory Committee of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He was on the editorial board of Statistics in Medicine from 1985 to 1994 and has served on the regional advisory board of the Biometrics Society and is currently chair of the biometrics section of the American Statistical Association. LAWRENCE S. BROWN, JR., is an attending physician in the Division of Endocrinology of the Department of Medicine at Harlem Hospital and assistant clinical professor of medicine in the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. He is also senior vice president for medical services, evaluation, and research of the Addiction Research and Treatment Corporation in Brooklyn, New York. He has an M.D. from New York University and an M.P.H. from Columbia University. He serves as a consultant to many federal, state, and city agencies, as well as private foundations and organizations, including the National Football League. He has participated in public policy development in health manpower and drug-abuse-related transmission of AIDS through projects, media presentations, and involvement in varied public and private task forces and fora. He is the author of several publications and is a member of the National Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, the New York Academy of Sciences, the Association for the Advancement of the Sciences, the professional section of the American Diabetes Association, the American Society for Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians, and the Black Leadership Commission on AIDS. RICHARD F. CATALANO, JR., is professor and associate director of the Social Development Research Group at the University of Washington's School of Social Work in Seattle. He has a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Washington. He has been involved in research and program development in the areas of drug abuse and delinquency for over 17 years. His work has focused on discovering risk and protective factors for adolescent problem behavior and designing and evaluating programs to address these factors. He is the principal investigator and coinvestigator on a number of federal grants, which involve family, school, and community-based prevention approaches to reduce risk while enhancing the protective factors of bonding and the promotion of healthy beliefs and clear standards. He has published over 50 articles and book chapters and has served on the Epidemiology and Prevention Review Committee of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and on the Washington

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Preventing HIV Transmission: The Role of Sterile Needles and Bleach State Advisory Committee for Alcohol and Substance Abuse. He is the codeveloper of the Social Development Model, a parenting program called Preparing for the Drug-Free Years, and the community prevention approach called Communities That Care. DAVID S. CORDRAY is professor of public policy and psychology and director of the Center for the Study of At-Risk Populations and Public Assistance Policy at the Vanderbilt Institute for Public Policy Studies. Prior to joining the faculty at Vanderbilt, he was an associate professor in the Division of Methodology and Evaluation Research at Northwestern University and the assistant director of federal welfare and statistical policy in the Program and Evaluation Methodology Division of the U.S. General Accounting Office. He has served as president of the American Evaluation Association, a member of the National Academy of Public Administration's Panel on Performance Indicators in Government, and a member of the evaluation review panel for the U.S. Department of Education. He has published dozens of journal articles and books, including Secondary Analysis of Program Evaluations (as coeditor); Volume 11 of the Evaluation Studies Review Annual (as coeditor); Explanatory Meta-Analysis: A Casebook (with Tom Cook et al.); articles on meta-analytic strategies and the quality of research; and articles on methodological issues associated with counting the homeless population. His current research areas include alcohol and other drug abuse among homeless people, the effects of job training on welfare and work, and methods for improving the quality of intervention research. Cordray has a B.A. in psychology and an M.A. in social psychology from California State University and a Ph.D. in social-environmental psychology and applied research methodology from Claremont Graduate School, with postdoctoral training in the Division of Methodology and Evaluation Research of Northwestern University. DON C. DES JARLAIS is director of research for the Chemical Dependency Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center; deputy director for AIDS Research with National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.; visiting professor of psychology at Columbia University; and professor of epidemiology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. A leader in the fields of AIDS and intravenous drug use over the last 15 years, he has published widely on these topics. He has served as consultant to various institutions, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the World Health Organization. He has been a member of a number of committees of the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, including the Committee on AIDS Research and the Behavioral, Social and Statistical Sciences and the Panel on AIDS and IV-Drug Use. He was a member of the President's National Commission on

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Preventing HIV Transmission: The Role of Sterile Needles and Bleach Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. He has a B.A. in behavioral sciences from Rice University and a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan; he also attended the University of the Philippines and the Universite de Paris (La Sorbonne). CASWELL A. EVANS, JR., is director of public health programs and services for Los Angeles County, California. He is responsible for the administration of disease prevention, health promotion, and health protection services for more than 9 million area residents. He serves as adjunct professor in the School of Public Health and the School of Dentistry at the University of California at Los Angeles; he is also associate professor for the Charles R. Drew Postgraduate Medical School. Prior to his associations with the Los Angeles County government, he was director of the County Health Services Division of the Seattle-King County Department of Public Health in Washington. He has an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan School of Public Health and a D.D.S. from the Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery. Evans is a diplomate of the American Board of Dental Public Health and also serves on the board of directors of the U.S. Conference of Local Health Officers. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. In 1994, he became president of the American Public Health Association. MARK B. FEINBERG is assistant professor of medicine and microbiology and immunology at the University of California, San Francisco, and assistant investigator at the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology. He directs the Virology Research Laboratory at San Francisco General Hospital and is the associate director of the University of California, San Francisco's Center for AIDS Research. He also serves as an attending physician with the Medicine and AIDS/Oncology Services at San Francisco General Hospital. His basic research activities focus on the regulation of HIV gene expression and the application of contemporary methods in molecular biology to the study of the pathogens of HIV disease. He received a B.A. in biology and anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.D. and Ph.D. in cancer biology from Stanford University School of Medicine. HERBERT D. KLEBER is professor of psychiatry and director of the Division on Substance Abuse at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute. He is also executive vice-president of the Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse. Prior to 1991, he served as the deputy director for demand reduction at the Office of National Drug Control Policy in the White House. Previously he was a professor of psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine; director of the Substance Abuse Treatment Unit at the Connecticut

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Preventing HIV Transmission: The Role of Sterile Needles and Bleach Mental Health Center; and chief executive officer of the APT Foundation, the major treatment site for drug abusers in the New Haven area. At Yale he was the director of two centers funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse: a clinical research center to develop new treatments for opiate and cocaine abuse, and a research training center to train physicians or psychologists for research careers in substance abuse. He has been a pioneer in the research and treatment of narcotic and cocaine abuse for over 25 years. He has a B.A. (cum laude with high distinction) in psychology from Dartmouth College and an M.D. from Thomas Jefferson Medical School. He is the author or coauthor of more than 190 papers, chapters, and books dealing with all aspects of substance abuse, and the editor of the recently published American Psychiatric Association Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment. He is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the American College of Psychiatrists, the New York Academy of Medicine, the College of Problems of Drug Dependence, and the American Academy of Psychiatrists in Alcoholism and Addictions. He has served on three National Research Council and Institute of Medicine committees and chairs a number of scientific advisory boards as well as government panels. JACQUES NORMAND is a study director at the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. Prior to his work with the Panel on Needle Exchange and Bleach Distribution Programs, he directed a National Research Council/Institute of Medicine panel study on drug use in the workplace and coedited its 1994 report entitled Under the Influence? Drugs and the American Work Force. Prior to joining the National Research Council in 1991, he held research psychologist positions in both the private and the public sectors. In that capacity, he was responsible for the development, validation, and implementation of various organizational intervention programs. He has published in various professional research journals and has spoken at numerous professional meetings on evaluation issues. He has also served as a consultant to the National Institute on Drug Abuse and acts as an ad hoc reviewer of applied drug-use research manuscripts for various professional journals. He has served as a technical adviser on the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Technical Review Meeting on Research Methods in Workplace Settings and recently completed a four-year term as a full member of the Drug Abuse Epidemiology and Prevention Research Grant Review Committee at the National Institutes of Health. He has a B.A. from McGill University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from the Illinois Institute of Technology. PATRICK M. O'MALLEY is research scientist and program director in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He has a B.S.

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Preventing HIV Transmission: The Role of Sterile Needles and Bleach from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Michigan. Since 1975, he has been a codirector of the Monitoring the Future project, an ongoing study of the lifestyles and values of American youth. This study, which involves annual national surveys of secondary school students in grades 8, 10, and 12 and young adults through age 35, provides the nation with annual reports on trends in the use of psychoactive drugs, including alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs. Since 1987, he has been a member of the Drug Abuse Epidemiology and Prevention Research Review Committee for the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He has published extensively on the use and abuse of psychoactive drugs and is senior author of a major report on the role of minimum drinking age laws in alcohol use by young Americans entitled Minimum Drinking Age: Effects on American Youth: 1976-1987. NANCY S. PADIAN is associate adjunct professor and assistant chief of research in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, where she heads a program in reproductive epidemiology. For the past 10 years, she has conducted a study of the heterosexual transmission of HIV in which she has examined the efficiency of and risk factors for transmission. She also conducts research on other sexually transmitted diseases and on contraceptive behaviors. She has a B.A. in child development and education from Colgate University, an M.S. in reading education from Syracuse University, and an M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees in epidemiology from the University of California at Berkeley. MARIAN GRAY SECUNDY is professor and director of the Program in Medical Ethics at the Howard University College of Medicine. She has been a visiting scholar at the University of San Francisco Health Policy Institute, the University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine, the National Leadership Training Program in Clinical Medical Ethics, Michigan State University, and Hiram College. A practicing psychotherapist, she is also editor of Trials, Tribulations, and Celebrations: African-American Perspectives on Health, Illness, Aging, and Loss. In 1993 she served as cochair of the Ethics Working Group of Hillary Rodham Clinton's Health Care Task Force. She has an A.B. in political science and sociology from Vassar College, an M.S.S. in community organization from Bryn Mawr College, and a Ph.D. in medical humanities/bioethics from Union Graduate School. DAVID VLAHOV is associate professor of epidemiology in the School of Hygiene and Public Health at The Johns Hopkins University, with a joint appointment in medicine at the School of Medicine. He has coordinated

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Preventing HIV Transmission: The Role of Sterile Needles and Bleach several large clinical epidemiologic studies of HIV infection among drug users (the ALIVE study) and is the principal evaluator of the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore needle exchange programs. He is also a registered nurse with a certificate in infection control and has worked in this capacity at the Baltimore Veterans Administration Medical Center, the University of Maryland Hospital, and Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Inc. The author of numerous articles, chapters, and monographs, he has served as a peer reviewer for a number of journals and been a member of editorial boards. He has participated on a number of advisory panels for the National Institutes of Health and served as a consultant for the Health Department in Washington, D.C.; the Municipal Institute of Health in Barcelona, Spain; and the Istituto Superiore d'Sanità in Italy. He is a member of the Society for Epidemiologic Research, the American Public Health Association, and the Infectious Disease Society of America, among others. He has a B.A. in history from Earlham College, a B.S.N. and an M.S. in nursing from the University of Maryland at Baltimore, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University. W. WAYNE WIEBEL is associate professor of epidemiology in the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He also serves as director of Community Outreach Intervention Projects at the university. Originally trained as an ethnographer, his research interests include the combined use of qualitative and quantitative research methods. He has been active in the field of substance abuse research over the past 20 years and in AIDS intervention research for the past 10 years. He has a B.A. in sociology from Northeastern University and an M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Northwestern University. DAVID R. WILLIAMS is associate professor of sociology and associate research scientist in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. His previous academic appointment was at Yale University. His research has focused on differences in socioeconomic status in health in general, and the health of the African American population in particular. He has served as a consultant to numerous federal health agencies and private organizations. Currently he is a member of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and chairs its subcommittee on Minority and Other Special Populations. He is also a member of the National Science Foundation's Board of Overseers for the General Social Survey. He has an M.P.H. from Loma Linda University, a M.Div. from Andrews University, and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.

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