Biographical Data

BRADEN R. ALLENBY is currently vice president for environment, health, and safety at AT&T. He is a member of the Virginia Bar and has worked as an attorney for the Civil Aeronautics Board and the Federal Communications Commission, as well as been a strategic consultant on economic and technical telecommunications issues. Allenby joined AT&T in 1983, as a telecommunications regulatory attorney and was an environmental attorney and senior environmental attorney at AT&T from 1984 to 1993. During 1992, he was the J. Herbert Holloman Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C. In 1994, he was appointed vice president for technology and environment with AT&T's Engineering Research Center and was seconded from AT&T in 1995 to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, where he directed the lab's energy and environmental systems until he assumed his current position at AT&T. Renowned for his pioneering work on industrial ecology, Allenby is the co-author of the first textbook on industrial ecology, published in 1995, and he conducts seminars and workshops on the subject. Allenby is a fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts, Manufactures & Commerce. He graduated cum laude from Yale University in 1972, received a J.D. from the University of Virginia Law School in 1978, and earned an M.A. in economics from the University of Virginia in 1979. He received an M.A. in environmental sciences from Rutgers University in 1989 and a Ph.D. in environmental sciences from Rutgers in 1992.

PRESTON S. CHIARO is vice president of technical services at Kennecott Corp. Chiaro joined Kennecott in 1991 to help direct a massive cleanup of historic mine wastes at Kennecott Utah Copper near Salt Lake City. In October 1992, he was named the company's vice president of environmental affairs. He is primarily responsible for Kennecott's compliance with federal, state, and local environmental



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The Industrial Green Game: Implications for Environmental Design and Management Biographical Data BRADEN R. ALLENBY is currently vice president for environment, health, and safety at AT&T. He is a member of the Virginia Bar and has worked as an attorney for the Civil Aeronautics Board and the Federal Communications Commission, as well as been a strategic consultant on economic and technical telecommunications issues. Allenby joined AT&T in 1983, as a telecommunications regulatory attorney and was an environmental attorney and senior environmental attorney at AT&T from 1984 to 1993. During 1992, he was the J. Herbert Holloman Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C. In 1994, he was appointed vice president for technology and environment with AT&T's Engineering Research Center and was seconded from AT&T in 1995 to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, where he directed the lab's energy and environmental systems until he assumed his current position at AT&T. Renowned for his pioneering work on industrial ecology, Allenby is the co-author of the first textbook on industrial ecology, published in 1995, and he conducts seminars and workshops on the subject. Allenby is a fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts, Manufactures & Commerce. He graduated cum laude from Yale University in 1972, received a J.D. from the University of Virginia Law School in 1978, and earned an M.A. in economics from the University of Virginia in 1979. He received an M.A. in environmental sciences from Rutgers University in 1989 and a Ph.D. in environmental sciences from Rutgers in 1992. PRESTON S. CHIARO is vice president of technical services at Kennecott Corp. Chiaro joined Kennecott in 1991 to help direct a massive cleanup of historic mine wastes at Kennecott Utah Copper near Salt Lake City. In October 1992, he was named the company's vice president of environmental affairs. He is primarily responsible for Kennecott's compliance with federal, state, and local environmental

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The Industrial Green Game: Implications for Environmental Design and Management requirements for all of its active mining and mineral processing operations as well as for its exploration, acquisition, and reclamation activities. He also oversees environmental audits and due-diligence assessments, provides permitting assistance, helps to promote industry concerns among regulators, and promotes awareness of energy efficiency and waste minimization. Prior to joining Kennecott, Chiaro managed a large environmental cleanup contract for Ebasco Environmental. He has a B.A. and M.A. (cum laude) in environmental engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and is a registered professional engineer in five states. DAVID R. COPE is executive director of the U.K. Center for Economic and Environmental Development in Cambridge, England. The center is a charitable foundation set up in 1984 to conduct research on and to promote adoption of policies that advance economic growth while ensuring a high quality environment. The center has its own programs and also works in collaboration with international, national, and local governments, foundations, voluntary groups, private enterprises, and trade associations. Cope was formerly the environmental team leader of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Coal Unit. Prior to his work at the IEA, he was an associate professor of energy and environment studies at the University of Nottingham, England. He has been an adviser to the U.K. government (on clean technologies and climate-change policy), an independent member of the committee set up to evaluate the implications of the Chernobyl incident for the United Kingdom, and a member of the Central Electricity Generating Board's environmental advisory panel. Cope has a B.A. in economics from Cambridge University and an M.A. in economics from the London School of Economics. GLYN ENGLAND is chairman of Windcluster Ltd., a small wind-power company with a distinctive siting policy for its generators, and of Silvanus Services Ltd., which is concerned with the restoration and productivity improvement of traditional woodlands. England was formerly chairman of the South Western Electricity Board (a regional electricity supplier in England), the Central Electricity Generating Board (the former state bulk-electricity supplier in England and Wales) and the Environment Council, a charitable foundation. He has also been a consultant to the World Bank, a vice president of the International Union of the Producers and Distributors of Electricity, and a member of the Nuffield Foundation Enquiry into the Town and Country Planning System in Britain. England is a member of both the governing board of the U.K. Center for Economic and Environmental Development and the Royal Academy of Engineering. ROBERT A. FROSCH is a senior research fellow at the Center for Science and International Affairs of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and senior fellow at the National Academy of Engineering. In 1989, Frosch revived, redefined, and popularized the term industrial ecology, and his research has focused on this field in recent years, especially in metals-handling

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The Industrial Green Game: Implications for Environmental Design and Management industries. In 1993, he retired as vice president of General Motors Corp., where he was in charge of the North American Operations Research and Development Center. Frosch holds as Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Columbia University. After doing research in underwater sound and ocean acoustics, he served for a dozen years in a number of government positions, including deputy director of Advanced Research Projects Agency of the Department of Defense, assistant secretary of the Navy for research and development, assistant executive director of the United Nations Environment Program, and administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Frosch is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. SUKEHIRO GOTOH is the director of the Social and Environmental Systems Division at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), the research arm of the Japan Environment Agency. Gotoh became an assistant professor in the Sanitary Engineering Department, Kyoto University, in 1972. From 1973 to 1974, he served as an assistant R&D project manager at the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, where he was in charge of the initiation phase of the National R&D Project of Recycling Technology (later known as the "Stardust 80" government project). In 1975, he joined the newly created NIES research center as a senior research officer. He has worked for NIES since then. In 1990, Gotoh served as a member and chairman of several Japanese government committees and councils. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in applied chemistry from Maseda University in Tokyo and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. HENNING GRANN is an environmental staff engineer with Statoil in Germany. Since 1958, he has served in various capacities at several petrochemical companies (Caltex, Shell Oil, Esso, and Statoil) in various locations (Netherlands, Canada, Denmark, United Kingdom, Norway, and Germany). Grann received an M.S. in chemical engineering from the Technical University of Denmark. JAMES HALL is an author in Ciba's Corporate Toxicology, Auditing, and Regulatory Compliance Department. Hall has a B.A. in biology from Lehigh University and an M.B.A. from Widener University. He has over 20 years of diversified experience in the fields of health, safety, environmental control, and production management in the chemical processing industry. INGE HORKEBY is manager of environmental protection at the Volvo Corp. Horkeby joined Volvo in 1974 and, in various positions in the company's technological development department, has researched surface coating areas and had responsibility for paint systems. Since 1988, he has been responsible for the environmental chemistry aspects of environmental protection, including the health and environmental aspects of all chemical products intended for the Volvo Group Companies, and for environmental technology research. Horkeby has an M.S. from the School of Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.

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The Industrial Green Game: Implications for Environmental Design and Management ROBERT JOHNSTON is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Victoria, and director, Australian Pulp and Paper Institute. Johnston joined the Australian Paper Manufacturers in 1964. He has consulted widely with industry, particularly the paper and packaging industries. Johnston's special interests are in control and applied mathematical and computer modeling. His production planning software for optimizing the allocation of orders in a paper mill has been installed in paper mills in Australia, France, and Japan. Johnston currently chairs the Environmental Code of Practice Committee for the Australian Packaging Industry and is co-director of the Cooperative Research Center for Hardwood Fibre and Paper Science. Johnston received a B.S. in chemical engineering from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in paper science from the University of Manchester Institute for Science and Technology, England. RICHARD MACVE is the Julian Hodge Professor of Accounting and head of the Department of Accounting and Finance at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. Macve qualified as a chartered accountant in the London office of Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. and was a member of the Council of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales from 1986 to 1993. His main research interests are in accounting for insurance and in the nineteenth-century history of the development of management accounting. Macve was educated at Chigwell School, New College, Oxford, and the London School of Economics and spent the 1982–83 academic year in the United States as a visiting professor at Rice University. ROLF MARSTRANDER is senior vice president for technology and ecology at Hydro Aluminum a.s. in Norway. From 1982 to 1991, when he assumed his current position, Marstrander was senior vice president for health, environment, and safety for Norsk Hydro a.s. From 1978 to 1982, he was director of the Norwegian State Pollution Control Agency. From 1969 to 1978, Marstrander was vice president of the Norwegian Research Council for Science and Technology. He has an M.S. from the Norwegian Institute of Technology. ANTONIO MAZZARIELLO is a senior adviser for environmental protection with the CIBA group, Basel, Switzerland. In that capacity, he is responsible for liaison with the U.S. Ciba group on environmental protection issues. A chemical engineer, Mazzariello started his career with Ciba in the process development department (thermal unit operations), where he led the off-gas treatment group and was responsible for the design and start-up of Ciba's air pollution control systems. He joined the corporate safety and environment group in Basel in 1992. M. GRANGER MORGAN heads the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and is on the faculty of the John H. Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management, also at CMU. His research interests include public policies in which technical issues play a central role and

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The Industrial Green Game: Implications for Environmental Design and Management techniques for dealing with uncertainty in quantitative policy analysis. Morgan was educated at Harvard University and received his Ph.D. in applied physics from the University of California at San Diego. He has served on a number of committees of the National Research Council as well as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board. C. PETER NAISH is a corporate environmental auditor responsible for carrying out environmental audits throughout the worldwide Ciba Group. Naish has a B.Sc. in chemical engineering from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England. He joined Ciba-Geigy in 1972 as a production chemist in the Schweizerhalle works, where he held various positions in the production areas. In 1981, Naish became environmental officer of the Schweizerhalle site, where he headed the environmental protection department until mid-1985, when he assumed his current position. DAVID REJESKI is executive director of the environmental technology task force at the Council of Environmental Quality, a post he assumed in 1997. He was previously on loan from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a program manager for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. At EPA, he ran the future studies unit in the agency's Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation. Before joining EPA, Rejeski worked for the Environmental Agency and Department of Public Health in Hamburg, Germany. He also co-directed a nongovernmental organization active in the areas of energy conservation, renewable energy resources, and sustainable building techniques. He has graduate degrees in public administration and environmental design from Harvard and Yale. DEANNA J. RICHARDS is acting director of the Program Office of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). She joined the Academy in 1990 to direct its program on Technology and Environment and has been the study director on several industrial ecology projects, focusing particularly on environmental design and management in several manufacturing and service sectors. Before joining the NAE, Richards was an assistant professor of environmental engineering and worked for several years as an environmental engineer. She received a B.S. (honors) in civil engineering from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, also in civil engineering, from the University of Pennsylvania. FRANÇOISE SIMON is a professor of marketing and international business at the Columbia Business School and also manages her own international consulting firm. Simon has over 15 years of experience in consulting and marketing management in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Her clients include many Fortune 500 companies as well as the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Department of Commerce, and several foreign governments. Simon's previous experience includes work as a director at Arthur D. Little, a principal of Ernst & Young, and a manager in the strategy group of Cresap, McCormick, &

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The Industrial Green Game: Implications for Environmental Design and Management Paget. She has also held positions as new product manager in international diagnostics for Abbott Laboratories in Chicago and marketing development manager for Ciba-Geigy AG in Switzerland. Simon holds an M.B.A. from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. from Yale University. She is vice president and director of the American Marketing Association and a member of the International Council of the American Management Association. WALTER R. STAHEL is a director of the Product-Life Institute in Geneva and deputy secretary general of the International Association for the Study of Insurance and Economics. Stahel's independent business consulting interests are in utilization-related technologies such as reuse, repair, reconditioning, and technological upgrading of components, goods, and systems; risk management and insurance; and regional economic development. For several years, he worked as a private architect in the United Kingdom and Switzerland. In 1973, he joined the Battelle Geneva Research Center as project manager in applied economics for business strategies and feasibility studies. In 1979, Stahel became personal assistant to the chief executive officer of a holding company with worldwide activities in railway maintenance, shipping, and real estate. Stahel has authored books and articles on strategies for the improved use of resources and about job creation. In 1978, he was awarded first prize in a German competition on job creation and, in 1982, was recipient of the U.S. Mitchell Prize for his paper "The Product-Life Factor." Stahel is an alumnus of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich, where he received a diploma in architecture and town planning. BRIAN L. STEELMAN is director of corporate environmental technology for Ciba U.S., where he is also responsible for the organization's financial performance and its investments in facilities and instrumentation. Steelman directly manages remediation activities at four Ciba sites. He is also a member of the firm's Corporate Remediation Planning and Advisory Group, the Textile Products Division Environmental Quality Resources Team, and an environmental roundtable for a major Ciba production facility. Steelman serves on two program committees of the Water Environment Federation. He has a B.S. in civil/sanitary engineering from Lafayette College (summa cum laude) and an M.A. from the California Institute of Technology. MARY WOODELL is founder and senior principal of CMRC & Co., a company specializing in crisis management and risk communication. For 3 years prior to establishing CMRC & Co., Woodell was a director in the environmental, health, and safety practice of Arthur D. Little, where she continues to serve as a consultant. Her other professional experience includes 8 years at Hill and Knowlton, where she was senior vice president and group director of the firm's crisis unit, and 5 years at Time Magazine.