F
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE

Harold C. Sox, Jr., M.D. (Chair), graduated from Stanford University (B.S. physics) and Harvard Medical School. After serving as a medical intern and resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, he spent two years doing research in immunology at the National Institutes of Health and three years at Dartmouth Medical School, where he served as Chief Medical Resident and began his studies of medical decisionmaking. He then spent 15 years on the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine, where he served as Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Director of Ambulatory Care at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center. In 1988, he returned to Dartmouth as a Joseph M. Huber Professor of Medicine and Chair of the Department of Medicine. Dr. Sox directs the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Physician Initiative at Dartmouth. He is a Regent of the American College of Physicians and chairs its Educational Policy Committee. He chairs the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force and the Institute of Medicine Committee to Study HIV Transmission Through Blood and Blood Products. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1993. His books include Medical Decision Making, and Common Diagnostic Tests: Selection and Interpretation. He is a member of the editorial board of the New England Journal of Medicine and is an Associate Editor of Scientific American Medicine.

Shulamith Bar-Shany, M.D., graduated from Haddassah-Hebrew University Medical School, and trained in hematology and transfusion medicine at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City. From 1969 to 1980, she held the position of Medical Director of Magen David Adom (MDA) Blood Banks in Tel Aviv,



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HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking F Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE Harold C. Sox, Jr., M.D. (Chair), graduated from Stanford University (B.S. physics) and Harvard Medical School. After serving as a medical intern and resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, he spent two years doing research in immunology at the National Institutes of Health and three years at Dartmouth Medical School, where he served as Chief Medical Resident and began his studies of medical decisionmaking. He then spent 15 years on the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine, where he served as Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Director of Ambulatory Care at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center. In 1988, he returned to Dartmouth as a Joseph M. Huber Professor of Medicine and Chair of the Department of Medicine. Dr. Sox directs the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Physician Initiative at Dartmouth. He is a Regent of the American College of Physicians and chairs its Educational Policy Committee. He chairs the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force and the Institute of Medicine Committee to Study HIV Transmission Through Blood and Blood Products. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1993. His books include Medical Decision Making, and Common Diagnostic Tests: Selection and Interpretation. He is a member of the editorial board of the New England Journal of Medicine and is an Associate Editor of Scientific American Medicine. Shulamith Bar-Shany, M.D., graduated from Haddassah-Hebrew University Medical School, and trained in hematology and transfusion medicine at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City. From 1969 to 1980, she held the position of Medical Director of Magen David Adom (MDA) Blood Banks in Tel Aviv,

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HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking Israel. From 1980 through 1991, she served as Director of MDA Blood Services. Since retiring in 1991, she continues her work as an ARMDI Fellow, pursuing medical and scientific activities in the field of viral hepatitis. David Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.P., is Chief, Health Policy Research and Development Unit, and Associate Physician at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. He is also an Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. From 1987 to 1991, he was Senior Vice President at Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital, a 720-bed Harvard teaching hospital. From 1981 to 1987, he was Executive Director of the Center for Health Policy and Management and Lecturer on Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. During the late 1970s, Dr. Blumenthal was a professional staff member on Senator Edward Kennedy's Senate Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research. He is a member of several editorial boards, including The New England Journal of Medicine, Inquiry, Quality Management in Health Care, the American Journal of Medicine, and the Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine. He serves on advisory committees to the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment, and several foundations. His research interests include quality management in health care, the determinants of physician behavior, access to health services, and the extent and consequences of academic-industrial relationships in the health sciences. Allan M. Brandt, Ph.D., is the Amalie Moses Kass Professor of the History of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He holds a joint appointment in the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University. Dr. Brandt earned his undergraduate degree at Brandeis University and a Ph.D. in American History from Columbia University in 1983. His work focuses on social and ethical aspects of health, disease, and medical practices in the twentieth century United States. Brandt is the author of No Magic Bullet: A Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States since 1880. He has written on the social history of epidemic disease, the history of public health, and the history of human subject research, among other topics. He is currently writing a book on the social and cultural history of cigarette smoking in the United States. Barbara A. DeBuono, M.D., M.P.H., began her affiliation with the Rhode Island Department of Health as a medical epidemiologist in July 1986. In October 1986, she was promoted to the position of State Epidemiologist and Medical Director for the office of Disease Control where she administered the divisions of AIDS/Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Chronic Diseases, Epidemiology/Communicable Diseases, Vital Records and Health Promotion.

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HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking On June 11, 1991, she was named Director of Health for the State of Rhode Island. She is responsible for a department that oversees maternal and child health activities, environmental health, disease control, the Board of Medical Licensure and Discipline, the Office of the Medical Examiner, among other public health programs. Prior to joining the Health Department, Dr. DeBuono completed a fellowship in infectious diseases at Brown University Medical School's Affiliated Hospitals Program in Providence. She completed her medical residency at the New England Deaconess Hospital in Boston. She holds a degree in English and biology from the University of Rochester, New York, where she subsequently received her M.D., followed by an M.P.H. from Harvard University. Since 1987, Dr. DeBuono has served as first Clinical Instructor in medicine, then Clinical Assistant Professor in medicine at Brown University Medical School. Martha Derthick, Ph.D., is the Julia Allen Cooper Professor of Government and Foreign Affairs at the University of Virginia, where she teaches courses on American political institutions and public policy. She is the author of numerous books on American public policymaking and administration, including Agency under Stress: The Social Security Administration in American Government (Brookings, 1990), The Politics of Deregulation (coauthor, 1986), which won the Louis Brownlow Award from the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA), and Policymaking for Social Security (1979), which was also awarded prizes by NAPA and the American Political Science Association. Roger Detels, M.D., M.S., received his training at Harvard College, New York University, University of California, San Francisco, and the University of Washington. He began his research career at the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit in Taipei, Taiwan in 1966. In 1969, he joined the research staff at the National Institute of Communicable Diseases and Stroke. In 1971 he moved to the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where he served as Chair of Epidemiology (1971–1980) and as the Dean of the School of Public Health (1980–1985). Professor Detels began his research in HIV/AIDS in 1981 when he initiated a natural history study of young homosexual men in Los Angeles. In 1984 he became the principal investigator of the Los Angeles Center of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, one of the largest natural history studies of HIV/AIDS in the world. He has published 59 papers on the epidemiology, natural history, immunology and biology of HIV-1 infection out of a total of more than 150 research papers. In 1988, Professor Detels initiated the UCLA/Fogarty International Training Program in Epidemiology Related to HIV/AIDS with funding from the Fogarty International Center. The program has trained a total of 54 health professionals at UCLA from Thailand, the

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HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore, Myanmar, India, China, Vietnam, Hungary, and Brazil. William B. Dulany, J.D., is an attorney engaged in the general practice of law as a partner in the law firm of Dulany & Leahy in Westminster, Maryland. He also serves as Chair of the Board on Mason-Dixon Bancshares, Inc., Episcopal Health Ministries, Inc., and Episcopal Ministries to the Aging, Inc. He is a former Chair of the American Heart Association (National Center) and currently serves as Chair of its Public Affairs and Policy Committee. Mr. Dulany is a graduate of Western Maryland College, which awarded him an honorary degree of Doctor of Law in 1989. He attended law school at the University of Michigan and University of Maryland, where he received his J.D. in 1953. He is former President of the Maryland Bar Foundation and has been an active member of sections and committees of bar associations. He is a native of Maryland, having served in the state legislature and also as a member of Maryland's Constitutional Convention. He has served on numerous governmental agencies and committees and is a Trustee of the Maryland Historical Society. Mark Feinberg, M.D., Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Microbiology & Immunology at the University of California, San Francisco, and an Assistant Investigator at the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology. He directs the Virology Research Laboratory at San Francisco General Hospital and is the Associate Director of the UCSF Center for AIDS Research. Dr. Feinberg also serves as an Attending Physician on the Medicine and AIDS/Oncology Services at San Francisco General Hospital. His basic research activities focus on the regulation of HIV gene expression, and the application of contemporary methods in molecular biology to the study of the pathogenesis of HIV disease. Jerry Mashaw, Ph.D., received his B.A. and LL.B. degrees from Tulane University in New Orleans. He spent two years as a Marshall Scholar at the University of Edinburgh where he worked on issues of European integration and received a Ph.D. in modern European governmental studies. Dr. Mashaw returned to Tulane and joined the law faculty there in 1966 where he taught for two years before migrating to the University of Virginia. It was at Virginia that he developed his major specialty in American administrative law and authored, with Richard Merrill, one of the leading course books in that field. Dr. Mashaw joined the Yale faculty in 1976 where he is currently Sterling Professor of Law. Professor Mashaw has done extensive work on bureaucracy and the administration of federal programs. He has a particular interest in combining the fields of law, economics, and organization theory in the analysis of

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HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking bureaucratic functioning. In pursuit of that interest, he founded along with Oliver Williamson, the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization . Professor Mashaw has been a particular student of the administration of the Social Security Disability Program, the Federal Aid Highways Program, programs of public assistance and most recently the regulation of motor vehicle safety. His books include: Due Process in the Administrative State, Bureaucratic Justice, America's Misunderstood Welfare State, and The Struggle for Auto Safety. Professor Mashaw is a member of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Social Insurance and various professional organizations. He is a sometime consultant to the U.S. Government and to certain private foundations. Dorothy Nelkin holds a university professorship at New York University where she is also Professor of Sociology and Affiliate Professor in the School of Law. She was formally a professor at Cornell University. Her research focuses on controversial areas of science, technology, and medicine as a means to understand their social and political implications and the relationship of science to the public. This work includes studies of anti-science movements, the impact of new technologies, public policies concerning science, and media communication of science and risk. She has recently examined the institutional uses of the diagnostic tests emerging from research in genetics and neuroscience, and is presently working on a study of hereditarian themes in popular culture. She has served on the Board of Directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on a National Strategy for AIDS. She has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Clare Boothe Luce Visiting Professor at NYU. She is currently on the National Institutes of Health Working Group on the Ethics, Legal, and Social Implication of the Human Genome Project. Her books include: Controversy: The Politics of Technical Decisions; Science as Intellectual Property; The Creation Controversy; Workers at Risk; Selling Science: How the Press Covers Science and Technology; Dangerous Diagnostics (with L. Tancredi); and The DNA Mystique (with S. Lindee). Madison Powers, Ph.D., J.D., is a Senior Research Scholar at Georgetown University's Kennedy Institute of Ethics and an Assistant Professor of philosophy at Georgetown University. He received his B.A. in history/political science from Vanderbilt University, his J.D. from the University of Tennessee, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from University College, Oxford. Professor Power's main research interests include moral and legal philosophy; medical ethics; and law, ethics, and health policy. He is currently a member of the Office of Technology Assessment's Advisory Panel on Information and Technology and

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HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking the Health Care System and has served as a consultant to the President's Health Care Reform Task Force in 1993. He has published numerous articles in the areas of ethics, philosophy and health policy. In addition, Dr. Powers has taught many graduate courses in health policy analysis, ethics and health care, and law, morality and health care at Georgetown University. Irwin M. Weinstein, M.D., is a practitioner of medicine in Los Angeles, California. He is the senior partner of an eight-person hematology/oncology group. Dr. Weinstein received his medical degree from the University of Colorado Medical School in 1949. In 1954, he joined the medical faculty at the University of Chicago as an instructor and then Assistant Professor of Medicine. During that time, Dr. Weinstein served with the U.S. Malaria Project. In 1955, Dr. Weinstein moved to the UCLA School of Medicine as an Associate Professor of Medicine and Head of Hematology at the Wadsworth General Hospital, Veterns Administration Center. Dr. Weinstein entered full-time practice of hematology and internal medicine in Los Angeles in 1959. He was appointed Clinical Professor of Medicine at the UCLA School of Medicine in 1970. Since 1982, he has been a member of the Medical School Admissions Committee. Dr. Weinstein has been a prominent member of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles since 1959, including Chief of Hematology from 1960 to 1970, and Chief of the Medical Staff from 1972 to 1974. Presently, he is an attending physician in the Department of Medicine and a member of the Board of Governors. Dr. Weinstein has been a leader in the American Society of Hematology, founding the forum on the Practice of Medicine, and serving on the Executive Committee. He has also been very active in the American College of Physicians. He served as Governor for Southern California from 1989 to 1993. In 1984, he was elevated to a Mastership in the American College of Physicians for his contributions as a practicing clinician and his contributions to the understanding of hematology and to medical education. Carol O'Boyle Williams, R.N., is a registered nurse with a M.S. degree in public health from the University of Minnesota. She is currently a doctoral student at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests include identification of variables influencing health care worker compliance with infection prevention and control strategies. Ms. O'Boyle Williams has served in both clinical and administrative positions in nursing and infection control in acute and outpatient settings and schools. She served as a board member and chairperson of the National Association for Professionals in Infection Control (APIC) and chaired APIC's Bloodborne Pathogen Committee. She served as a member of the American Hospital Association's HIV/HBV Infected Health Care Worker Task Force. Most recently she served as an invited infection control researcher to hospitals in Costa Rica, Thailand, and Hungary. As the

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HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking chairperson of APIC's Bloodborne Pathogen Committee, she also served as an invited consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to discuss development of guidelines for prevention of HIV infection. Ms. O'Boyle Williams is currently the Clinical Nurse Specialist in Infection Control at the Minnesota Department of Health, operating the program to evaluate and monitor the practices of health care workers infected with the human immunodeficiency virus or the hepatitis B virus. STAFF BIOGRAPHIES Michael Stoto, Ph.D., is the Director of the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He received an A.B. in statistics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in statistics and demography from Harvard University, and was formerly an associate professor of public policy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. A member of the professional staff since 1987, Dr. Stoto directed the IOM's effort in support of the Public Health Service's Healthy People 2000 project and has worked on IOM projects addressing a number of issues in public health, health statistics, health promotion and disease prevention, vaccine safety and policy, and AIDS. Most recently, Dr. Stoto served as study director for the IOM committee that produced Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam. Dr. Stoto is co-author of Data for Decisions: Information Strategies for PolicyMakers and numerous articles in statistics, demography, health policy, and other fields. He is a member of the American Public Health Association, the American Statistical Association, the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, the Population Association of America, and other organizations. Lauren Leveton, Ph.D., is Study Director for the Committee to Study HIV Transmission Through Blood and Blood Products. She received a B.S. in psychology from Clark University and a Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University College of Human Development. Dr. Leveton has a research background in behavioral health, social science, and human factors engineering. More recently, she has conducted activities in program evaluation, strategic planning, and policy development for federal agencies including the U.S. Army and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. She worked with several NASA advisory committees, including the Advisory Committee for the Future of the U.S. Civil Space Program, the Aerospace Medical Advisory Committee, and others that reviewed priorities for space life sciences and biomedical research programs.

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HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking Cynthia Abel is a Program Officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. She received a B.A. in government and political sciences from the University of Maryland and is working on a masters in public policy. Most recently, she worked with the IOM committee that produced Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam and with several other IOM committees in the area of health promotion and disease prevention. She also worked with the National Research Council's committee that produced the report Safety Issues at the Defense Production Reactors: A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy. Laura Colosi, M.P.A., is the Research Assistant for the Committee to Study HIV Transmission Through Blood and Blood Products in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. She received a B.S. in human service studies from Cornell University and a masters in public administration from Cornell's Institute for Public Affairs, with a specialization in families and social policy. Her work experience includes serving as a Research Assistant with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Personnel Administration at the Department of Health and Human Services and also with the Office of the Deputy Attorney General at the Department of Justice. Kristina Becker is the Project Assistant for the Committee to Study HIV Transmission Through Blood and Blood Products. She received a B.A. in journalism from Ohio University with a specialization in public relations and business administration. She has served as a consultant for the public affairs office of Bank One, Cleveland, and has completed several internships in the communications field.