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Not Eating Enough, 1995

Pp. 419-432. Washington, D.C.

National Academy Press

A
Biographical Sketches

COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION RESEARCH

ROBERT O. NESHEIM (Chair) was Vice President of Research and Development and later Science and Technology for the Quaker Oats Company. He retired in 1983 and was Vice President of Science and Technology and President of the Advanced Health Care Division of Avadyne, Inc. before his retirement in 1992. During World War II, he served as a Captain in the U.S. Army. Dr. Nesheim has served on the Food and Nutrition Board, chairing the Committee on Food Consumption Patterns and serving as a member of several other committees. He also was active in the Biosciences Information Service as its Board Chairman, American Medical Association, American Institute of Nutrition, Institute of Food Technologists, and Food Reviews International editorial board. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Nutrition and American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of several professional organizations. Dr. Nesheim received a B.S. in Agriculture, M.S. in Animal Science, and Ph.D. in Nutrition and Animal Science from the University of Illinois.

RICHARD L. ATKINSON is Professor of Internal Medicine, Department of Nutritional Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was the Associate Chief of Staff for Research and Development at the Veterans'



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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations Not Eating Enough, 1995 Pp. 419-432. Washington, D.C. National Academy Press A Biographical Sketches COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION RESEARCH ROBERT O. NESHEIM (Chair) was Vice President of Research and Development and later Science and Technology for the Quaker Oats Company. He retired in 1983 and was Vice President of Science and Technology and President of the Advanced Health Care Division of Avadyne, Inc. before his retirement in 1992. During World War II, he served as a Captain in the U.S. Army. Dr. Nesheim has served on the Food and Nutrition Board, chairing the Committee on Food Consumption Patterns and serving as a member of several other committees. He also was active in the Biosciences Information Service as its Board Chairman, American Medical Association, American Institute of Nutrition, Institute of Food Technologists, and Food Reviews International editorial board. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Nutrition and American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of several professional organizations. Dr. Nesheim received a B.S. in Agriculture, M.S. in Animal Science, and Ph.D. in Nutrition and Animal Science from the University of Illinois. RICHARD L. ATKINSON is Professor of Internal Medicine, Department of Nutritional Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was the Associate Chief of Staff for Research and Development at the Veterans'

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations Affairs Medical Center in Hampton, Virginia. Concurrently, Dr. Atkinson was Professor of Internal Medicine and Chief of the Division of Clinical Nutrition at the Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia. He served 4 years in the military at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington, D.C. and the U.S. Army Hospital in Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Dr. Atkinson is an editorial board member for the Journal of Nutrition , a medical advisory board member for Obesity Update, and a contributing editor for Nutrition Reviews. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Institute of Nutrition, and Endocrine Society; he is a fellow of the American College of Nutrition and American College of Physicians. Dr. Atkinson holds a B.A. from the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington and M.D. from the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, where he served his internship. He then completed his residency at Harbor General Hospital in Torrance, California. WILLIAM R. BEISEL is Adjunct Professor in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He held several positions at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick, Maryland, including in turn, Chief of the Physical Sciences Division, Scientific Advisor, and Deputy for Science. He then became Special Assistant for Biotechnology to the Surgeon General. After serving in the U.S. military during the Korean War, Dr. Beisel was the Chief of Medicine at the U.S. Army Hospital in Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri, before becoming the Chief of the Department of Metabolism at the Walter Reed Army Hospital. He was awarded a Commendation Ribbon, Bronze Star for the Korean War, Hoff Gold Medal at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, B. L. Cohen Award of the American Society for Microbiology, and Department of Army Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service. He was named a diplomat of the American Board of Internal Medicine and a fellow of the American College of Physicians. In addition to his many professional memberships, Dr. Beisel is a Clinical Nutrition contributing editor and Journal of Nutritional Immunology editor. He received his A.B. from Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and M.D. from the Indiana University School of Medicine. GAIL E. BUTTERFIELD is Director of Nutrition Studies at the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center of the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center in California. Concurrently, she is Lecturer in the Department of Medicine, Stanford University Medical School, and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Biology, Stanford University. Her previous academic appointments were at the University of California-Berkeley. Dr. Butterfield belongs to the American Institute of Nutrition, American Dietetic Association, and American Physiological Society. As a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, she serves on the Position

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations Stands Committee and the editorial board for Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. She also was the Past President and Executive Director of the Southwest Chapter of that organization and an Ad Hoc Member for the Respiratory and Applied Physiology Study Section of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Butterfield received her A.B. in Biological Sciences, M.A. in Anatomy, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Nutrition from the University of California-Berkeley. JOHN D. FERNSTROM is Professor of Psychiatry, Pharmacology, and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and Director, Basic Neuroendocrinology Program at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. He received his S.B. in Biology and his Ph.D. in Nutritional Biochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.). He was a Post-doctoral Fellow in Neuroendocrinology at the Roche Institute for Molecular Biology in Nutley, New Jersey. Before coming to the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Fernstrom was an Assistant and then Associate Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science at M.I.T. He has served on numerous governmental advisory committees. He presently is a member of the National Advisory Council of the Monell Chemical Senses Center and is chairman of the Neurosciences Section of the American Institute of Nutrition. He is a member of numerous professional societies, including the American Institute of Nutrition, the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, the American Physiological Society, the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, the American Society for Neurochemistry, the Society for Neuroscience, and the Endocrine Society. Among other awards, Dr. Fernstrom received the Mead-Johnson Award of the American Institute of Nutrition, a Research Scientist Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, a Welcome Visiting Professorship in the Basic Medical Sciences, and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in Neurochemistry. His current major research interest concerns the influence of the diet and drugs on the synthesis of neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. JOËL A. GRINKER is Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the School of Public Health, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. She is a member of the university's Center for Human Growth and Development and served as Director of the Program in Human Nutrition. She was Visiting Scientist at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston and Visiting Associate Professor at the Lavaratoire de Neurophysiologie Sensorielle et Compartmental, College de France, Paris. Currently, she is a reviewer for the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, and National Science Foundation and for several professional journals. She serves on the editorial boards for Appetite, Journal of Eating Disorders,, and Psychosomatic Medicine. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, American Association for the Advancement

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations of Science, and New York Academy of Sciences and is a member of several professional societies. Dr. Grinker holds a B.A. in Psychology from Wellesley College in Massachusetts and Ph.D. in Experimental Social Psychology from New York University. At Rockefeller University, she was a Russell Sage Post-doctoral Fellow in the Laboratory of Human Behavior and Metabolism of Dr. Jules Hirsch and then Assistant and Associate Professor. G. RICHARD JANSEN is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Colorado State University, where he was head of the department from 1969–1990. He was a Research Fellow at the Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research and Senior Research Biochemist in the Electrochemical Department at E. I. DuPont de Nemours. Prior to his stint in private industry, he served in the U.S. Air Force. Dr. Jansen is a past member of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Human Nutrition Board of Scientific Counselors and the Journal of Nutrition, Nutrition Reports International, and Plant Foods for Human Nutrition editorial boards. His research interests deal with protein energy relationships during lactation and new foods for LDCs based on low-cost extrusion cooking. He received the Babcock-Hart Award of the Institute of Food Technologists and a Certificate of Merit from the USDA's Office of International Cooperation and Development for his work on low-cost extrusion cooking, and he is an IFT Fellow. He is a member of the American Institute of Nutrition, Institute of Food Technologists, and American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology among others. Dr. Jansen holds a B.A. in Chemistry and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. ORVILLE A. LEVANDER is Research Leader for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland. He was Research Chemist at the USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center, Resident Fellow in Biochemistry at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Research Associate at Harvard University's School of Public Health. Dr. Levander served on the Food and Nutrition Board's Committee on the Dietary Allowances. He also served on the National Research Council's Committee on Animal Nutrition and Committee on the Biological Effects of Environmental Pollutants. He was a member of the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Nutrition Scientists and temporary advisor to the World Health Organization's Environmental Health Criteria Document on Selenium. Dr. Levander was awarded the Osborne and Mendel Award for the American Institute of Nutrition. His society memberships include the American Institute of Nutrition, American Chemical Society, and American Society for Clinical Nutrition. Dr. Levander received his B.A. from Cornell University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations GILBERT A. LEVEILLE is Vice President for Research and Technical Services at the Nabisco Foods Group in East Hanover, New Jersey. His other industry experience was as the Director of Nutrition and Health Science for the General Foods Corporation. He was Chair and Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Michigan State University, Professor of Nutritional Biochemistry at the University of Illinois-Urbana, and a Biochemist at the U.S. Army Medical Research and Nutrition Laboratory in Colorado. Dr. Leveille is a current member on the Committee on International Nutrition, a joint Food and Nutrition Board-Board on International Health project. He won a Research Award from the Poultry Science Association, the Mead Johnson Research Award from the American Institute of Nutrition, the Distinguished Faculty Award from Michigan State University, and the Carl R. Fellers Award from the Institute of Food Technologists. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Institute of Nutrition (Past President), American Society for Clinical Nutrition, American Chemical Society, Institute of Food Technologists (Past President), and Sigma Xi. Dr. Leveille received his B.V.A. from the University of Massachusetts and M.S. and Ph.D. in Nutrition and Biochemistry from Rutgers University, New Jersey. JOHN E. VANDERVEEN is the Director of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Plant and Dairy Foods and Beverages in Washington, D.C. His previous position at the FDA was Director of the Division of Nutrition, at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. He also served in various capacities at the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas. He has received accolades for service from the FDA and the USAF. Dr. Vanderveen is a member of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, American Institute of Nutrition, Aerospace Medical Association, American Dairy Science Association, Institute of Food Technologists, and American Chemical Society. In the past, he was the Treasurer of the American Society of Clinical Nutrition and a member of the Institute of Food Technology, National Academy of Science Advisory Committee. Dr. Vanderveen holds a B.S. in Agriculture from Rutgers University, New Jersey and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of New Hampshire. ALLISON A. YATES is Dean of the College of Health and Human Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi and Professor of Foods and Nutrition. She is currently on leave as Dean to serve as Director of the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine in Washington, D.C. She has a Ph.D. in Nutrition from the University of California at Berkeley, and an M.S. in Public Health from UCLA, and is a registered dietitian. Her areas of expertise are in food habits, diet composition, and protein and energy interrelationships.

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations JOHANNA T. DWYER (FNB Liaison) is the Director of the Frances Stern Nutrition Center at New England Medical Center, Professor of Medicine and Community Health at the Tufts University School of Medicine, and Professor of Nutrition at Tufts University School of Nutrition in Boston. She is also Senior Scientist at the Jean Mayer/USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts. Dr. Dwyer is the author or coauthor of more than 80 research articles and 175 review articles published in scientific journals. Her work centers on life-cycle related concerns such as the prevention of diet-related disease in children and adolescents and maximization of quality of life and health in the elderly. She also has a long-standing interest in vegetarian and other alternative lifestyles. Dr. Dwyer is the immediate past President of the American Institute of Nutrition, past Secretary of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, and past President and current Fellow of the Society for Nutrition Education. She served on the Program Development Board of the American Public Health Association from 1989 to 1992 and is a member of the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences, the Technical Advisory Committee of the Nutrition Screening Initiative, and the Board of Advisors for the American Institute of Wine and Food. As the Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow (1980–1981), she served on the personal staffs of Senator Richard Lugar (R-Indiana) and Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-Maryland). Dr. Dwyer has received numerous honors and awards for her work in the field of nutrition, including the J. Harvey Wiley Award from the Society for Nutrition Education. She was invited to give the Lenna Frances Cooper Lecture at the annual meeting of the American Dietetic Association in 1990. Dr. Dwyer is currently on the Editorial Advisory Board for Clinics in Applied Nutrition and is a Contributing Editor for Nutrition Reviews as well as a reviewer for the Journal of the American Dietetic Association and the American Journal of Public Health. She received her D.Sc. and M.Sc. from the Harvard School of Public Health, an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin, and completed her undergraduate degree with distinction from Cornell University. BERNADETTE M. MARRIOTT (FNB Staff, Program Director) is Program Director for the Committee on Military Nutrition Research and Deputy Director, Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. She has a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, and B.Sc. in Biochemistry/Immunology and post doctoral laboratory training in comparative medicine and trace mineral nutrition. She serves on the Scientific Advisory board for the Diagon Corporation and the American Health Foundation. She serves as scientific reviewer for the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation and National Geographic. Prior to joining the Institute of Medicine staff, she held university and medical school faculty positions at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Puerto Rico Schools of

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations Medicine, and Goucher College. Her areas of research interest include bioenergetic modeling, trace mineral nutrition, and ingestive behavior in human and nonhuman primates. AUTHORS CELIA F. ADOLPHI is a Food Management Specialist for the Department of the Army Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Prior to this, she was a Clinical Instructor for Clinical Dietetics during an internship at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and served in dietetic positions at Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia; St. Joseph's Hospital Health Center School of Nursing in Syracuse, New York; and Winona Memorial Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana. Ms. Adolphi is a member of the American Dietetic Association and Nutrition Education for the Public Practice Group, and a life member of the Reserve Officers Association. She received the Secretary of the Army Meritorious Civilian Service Award, District of Columbia Dietetic Association Outstanding Dietitian of the Year Award, and Sister Romuald Award for Outstanding Dietetic Intern. Ms. Adolphi is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and her military service includes Colonel (USAR) in the Quartermaster Corps, with her current service being Commander of the 55th Material Management Center in Fort Belvoir, Virginia. She earned a B.A. in Dietetics from Marian College and M.S. in Counseling and Guidance from Butler University's College of Education, both in Indianapolis, Indiana. CAROL J. BAKER-FULCO is a research dietitian in the Military Nutrition Division of the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine. She received a Master of Science degree in nutrition from the University of Bridgeport. Her areas of specialty include sports nutrition, nutrient requirements at high altitude, nutrition education, and dietary assessment. Ms. Baker is a member of the American Dietetic Association, the Research Dietitian Practice Group, and the Practice Group on Sports and Cardiovascular Nutrition. PHILIP BRANDLER is a member of the Army Acquisition Corps and serves as the current Director of Sustainability at the U.S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center (Natick) in Massachusetts in charge of all troop quality-of-life items. At Natick, he held positions as the Director of Food Engineering, the Assistant to the Technical Director for Program Integration, Deputy to the Commander for Installation Operations, Director of Systems Analysis and Concept Development, and Chief of Operations Research/Systems Analysis. Prior to Natick, Mr. Brandler worked for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Electronics Research

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations Center, the Air Force Cambridge Research Labs, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His accomplishments have been recognized with the Technical Director's Gold Pin Award for Research, the Colonel Rohland A. Isker Award from Research and Development Associates, the TROSCOM Leadership Award, the Ten Outstanding AMC Personnel of the Year Award, the Decoration for Meritorious Civilian Service, and the Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service. He is a member of the Operations Research Society of America, the Military Operations Research society, and the Institute of Food Technologists. Mr. Brandler received his Bachelor's Degree in Physics from Columbia University and holds Advanced Degrees in Physics, Industrial Engineering/Operations Research, and Business Administration from Brown University and Northeastern University. ARMAND V. CARDELLO is a Research Psychologist in the Behavioral Sciences Division at the U.S. Army Natick RD&E Center in Natick, Massachusetts. Dr. Cardello received his A.B. in Psychology at Dartmouth College and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. In addition to his numerous scientific publication in the areas of human psychophysics and consumer food acceptance, he is a member of the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Sensory Studies and Food Quality and Preference and is contributing columnist for Cereal Foods World. Dr. Cardello's current research interests are in the areas of sensory psychology, consumer research, and the psychological factors controlling food choice and acceptance. GERMAINE CORNÉLISSEN is Director of Biometry at the Chronobiology Laboratories of the University of Minnesota. With Dr. Franz Halberg, she coordinates the International Womb-to-Tomb Chronome Initiative. She is co-editor of the journal Chronobiologia and serves on the board of the International Society for Research on Civilian Diseases and the Environment (SIRMCE). She is also a member of several professional organizations. Dr. Cornélissen received a master's in Physics and in Education and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Brussels, Belgium. GERALD A. DARSCH is the Chief of the Ration Systems Division, Sustainability Directorate, U.S. Army Natick Research Development and Engineering Center in Natick, Massachusetts. He directs and coordinates a broad food program involving innovative research, development, production engineering, and standardization activities. Prior to his current assignment, he was a special assistant for the Department of Defense Food Program and a food technologist. Mr. Darsch has received the U.S. Army Material Command Top Ten Award, Operation Desert Shield/Storm (Commander, AMC) Award, Meritorious Civilian Service Award, Superior Civilian Service Award, Technical Director's Gold Pins For Excellence in Research and in Engineering,

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations and Sigma Xi Award for Excellence in Research and Engineering Sciences. He holds a B.S. in Food Science and Nutrition from the University of Massachusetts and an M.S. in Food and Nutrition from Framingham State College. JOHN M. de CASTRO is a Professor of Psychology at Georgia State University. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1974 and since then has been in the Department of Psychology at Georgia State University. His research interests focus on the physiological, sociological, psychological, and nutritional determinant of food and fluid intake regulation in both human and nonhuman species. Studies have been undertaken into the role of subjective states, restrained eating, bulimia, social facilitation, French versus American culture, weekly intake rhythms, heredity, circadian and seasonal rhythms, physical activity, lactation, stomach factors, head injury, macronutrients, alcohol, infancy, puberty, and aging in the regulation of the normal naturally occurring meal to meal intake of free-living humans. DIANNE ENGELL is a Research Psychologist at the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Center. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Clark University, and has worked in managerial and research positions at Natick since 1982. Her research interests relate to human eating and drinking behavior, especially the effects of situational factors on intake, the sensory influences on thirst and beverage intake, and the interaction of eating and drinking. JOHN P. FOREYT is a Professor in the Departments of Medicine and of Psychiatry and the current Director of the De Bakey Heart Center's Nutrition Research Clinic at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Prior to this, he served on the faculty at Florida State University. Dr. Foreyt is a Fellow of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, a Fellow of the Behavioral Therapy and Research Society, and a Fellow of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. He is a current member of the editorial boards of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Eating Disorders, Obesity Research, Journal of Behavioral Medicine, American Journal of Health Promotion, Health Values, Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, and Medicine, Exercise, Nutrition and Health and the Food and Nutrition Board's Committee to Develop Criteria for Evaluating the Outcomes of Approaches to Prevent and Treat Obesity. Dr. Foreyt received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Florida State University. KARL E. FRIEDL is the Staff Officer for Army Operations Medicine at the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland. Prior to this assignment, he was an Army research physiologist, specializing in body composition in the Occupational Physiology Division at

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts. Previously, he worked in the Department of Clinical Investigation at Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington. He received his Ph.D. in Biology in 1984 from the Institute of Environmental Stress at the University of California at Santa Barbara. G. KEN GOODRICK is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He has been associated with the Nutrition Research Clinic since 1978. He is Co-Director of the Obesity and Eating Disorders Prevention Program at Texas Children's Hospital and Director of Employee Counseling at Methodist and Texas Children's Hospitals. Dr. Goodrick received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Northwestern University, his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Houston, followed by a 3-year NIH postdoctoral fellowship in health psychology at Baylor. FRANZ HALBERG is Professor of Laboratory Medicine, Pathology, Physiology, biology, Oral Medicine and Bioengineering and director of the Chronobiology Laboratories at the University of Minnesota. He has played an important role in medicine by building the new science of chronobiology. For this science of the body's time structure, he provided all of the critical ingredients: new concepts, methods, facts, mechanisms and applications. Dr. Halberg is an Academician of the French National Academy of Medicine in Paris and of the Spanish National Academy of Veterinary Medicine in Madrid. He received honorary doctorates from the University of Montpellier, France and the University of Ferrara, Italy and honorary professorships at the Université Réné Descartes in Paris France; the Technological University of Madrid, Spain; the Chengdu College of Traditional Chinese Medicine and the West China University of Medical Sciences in Chengdu, China; and the Shaanxi Provincial Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Pharmacology in Xi'an, China. He is an honorary fellow of the International College of Nutrition and an honorary member of the Italian, Indian, and Galician Societies for Chronobiology, the Alaska Medical Association, the Sociedad Medica de la Plata in Argentina, and Galician Pediatric Society. He has received medals from the Université Réné Descartes in Paris, France; Masaryk University in Brno, then Czechoslovakia; and the Universities of Montpellier, France; of Krakow, Poland; of Ferrara, Italy; of Szeged, Hungary; and of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. He received the Plaque of the Trustees Society of the University of Minnesota in 1993. He currently serves as Vice-President (chief U.S. officer) of the International Society for Research on Civilization Diseases and the Environment, and on editorial boards or councils of Fortschritte der Medizin, New Trends in Experimental and Clinical Psychiatry, Brain Dysfunction, In vivo, and Chronobiologia. Dr. Halberg received his medical training at the University of Cluj, Romania (1937–1943) and postgraduate training in internal medicine and endocrinology at Harvard Medical School

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations (1948–1949) and has been on the faculty of the University of Minnesota Medical School since 1949. ERHARD HAUS is Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology of the University of Minnesota, and Chairman of the Department of Anatomic and Clinical Pathology at St. Paul-Ramsey Medical Center, St. Paul, Minnesota. Dr. Haus has been engaged in the study of chronobiology since the mid 1950s. During the last two decades, his studies include the role of the time of food uptake and of food composition on circadian rhythm synchronization in animals and in human subjects. Recently, he is engaged in the study of clinical chronobiology with the establishment of time-qualified usual values and time-dependent changes in endocrine and nonendocrine disease states. Dr. Haus received his M.D. at the University of Innsbruck in Austria and his Ph.D. in Pathology, Cancer Biology, and Biochemistry from the University of Minnesota. EDWARD S. HIRSCH is a Research Psychologist at the U.S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center. He received a Ph.D. in physiological and comparative psychology from Rutgers University. His interest in environmental influences on human feeding behavior stems from his earlier work on ecological influences on energy intake and patterns of ingestion in nonhuman animals. F. MATTHEW KRAMER currently is Acting Chief of the Consumer Research Branch at the U.S. Army Natick Research, Development, and Engineering Center. He received a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the Pennsylvania State University and completed postdoctoral work at the University of Minnesota and the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Kramer's research interests focus on understanding human food habits, that is, the factors underlying food selection, intake, and acceptability. MARY Z. MAYS received her Ph.D. in experimental psychology with a specialization in learning and memory from the University of Oklahoma in 1977. From 1990 to 1993 she was the Director of the Military Performance and Neuroscience Division at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick, Massachusetts. Her research there focused on the impact of stress on cognitive and affective behavior. HERBERT L. MEISELMAN is Senior Research Scientist (Behavior and Performance) at the U.S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center. His research interests include consumer and sensory research related to product development, field research, food habits and nutrition, and human factors, with emphasis on individual performance and product/system design. Dr. Meiselman served previously as Special Assistant for the

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations Department of Defense Food Program and as Chief, Behavioral Sciences Division. He is Editor of Food Quality and Preference. He earned his doctorate in psychology from the University of Massachusetts and worked as a postdoctoral fellow in neurobiology and psychology at Cornell University under National Science Foundation fellowships. PETER MOTRYNCZUK currently is assigned to the Army Center of Excellence, Subsistence, U.S. Army Quartermaster Center and School in Ft. Lee, Virginia, where he is Assistant Chief, Culinary Skills Training Division. Chief Motrynczuk has 25 years of army food service experience that includes 11 years in the enlisted ranks and 14 years as a food service warrant officer/technician. His food service experience provided for varied assignments of increased responsibility, which included tours of duty with the 2d Infantry Division, Korea; 25th Infantry Division, Hawaii; 7th Signal Brigade and 5th Signal Command, Federal Republic of Germany; 3rd Infantry Division, U.S. Army in Europe (USAREUR); and the Readiness Group, Ft. Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania. His most recent assignments include positions as Chief, Army Field Feeding System; Project Officer, Army Field Feeding System-Future; and Food Advisor/Technician, 2d Infantry Division, Korea. Chief Motrynczuk's military training includes completion of the Warrant Officer Advance Course, Warrant Officer Senior Course, Warrant Officer Staff Course, Nutrition Course, Contracting Officer Representative Course, and the Instructor Training Course. He has an Associate of Arts degree from New York University in vocational subjects. JEAN E. NELSON is a Clinical Project Director in the Nutrition Research Clinic at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Her previous work includes research on binge eating disorder and child psychiatry at the National Institute of Mental Health. Ms. Nelson holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Virginia and a Master of Health Science degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. STEPHEN D. PHINNEY is Associate Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, School of Medicine, University of California at Davis. His research interests focus on diet and physical performance, and on the human utilization of polyunsaturated fats. Dr. Phinney received a B.S. in Chemistry from Antioch College, his M.D. from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Nutritional Biochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. BARBARA J. ROLLS obtained a B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in physiology from the University of Cambridge, England. Most of her research career was spent at the University of Oxford, England, where she held a number of fellowships. In 1984, she moved to the

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where she was Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Human Ingestive Behavior and Professor of Psychiatry. In 1992, she moved to the Pennsylvania State University to become the Jean Phillips Shibley Professor of Biobehavioral Health; she became Professor of Nutrition and occupant of the Guthrie Chair in Nutrition in 1994. Dr. Rolls is Past-President of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior and is Vice President of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity. She is a member of the Advisory Council of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. She is on the editorial boards of Appetite, The American Journal of Physiology, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Obesity Research, and Nutrition Reviews. Her research interests include the controls of food and fluid intake, especially as they relate to obesity, eating disorders, and aging. DAVID D. SCHNAKENBERG is currently the Executive Officer of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, Inc. in Bethesda, MD. Prior to assuming this position, he completed 30 years of service as a Research Biochemist in the Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army. During his military career, he served as a Clinical Toxicologist at the 9th Medical Laboratory, Republic of Vietnam, and as a Research Nutritional Scientist at the U.S. Army Medical Research and Nutrition Laboratory in Denver, CO, and at the Letterman Army Institute of Research, Presidio of San Francisco, CA. He also served as Nutrition Staff Officer for the Assistant Surgeon General of the Army for Research and Development at the Pentagon. He reestablished the Military Nutrition Research Program at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine at Natick, MA and later served as its Commander and Scientific Director. He completed his Army career as Director, Army Systems Hazards Research Program, U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command at Ft. Detrick, MD. COL Schnakenberg retired in June 1993. Dr. Schnakenberg received a B.S. in Agriculture and an M.S. in Animal Nutrition from the University of Missouri and a Ph.D. in Metabolic Physiology from the University of California at Davis. He is a member of the American Institute of Nutrition, the American Society of Clinical Nutrition, and the American College of Sports Medicine. HOWARD G. SCHUTZ is Professor Emeritus of Consumer Sciences at the University of California at Davis and is now its Director of the Science and Society Program. Previously he has worked at Hunt-Wesson Foods, Battelle Memorial Institute, and the Quartermaster Food and Container Institute. He has a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Illinois and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Psychology from the Illinois Institute of Technology. His principal area of research interest is measuring and relating food attitudes to food purchase and consumption.

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Not Eating Enough: Overcoming Underconsumption of Military Operational Rations EILEEN G. THOMPSON is Manager of Corporate Strategic Research in the Information Development and Technology Department in Kraft Foods' Marketing Services area in Glenview, Illinois. She is responsible for Kraft Foods' External Assessment process as well as pan-company research and support for the Corporate Strategy area. Prior to joining Kraft, Dr. Thompson worked in Marketing Research for the Quaker Oats Company in Chicago, Illinois. She conducted marketing research in Pet Foods and Hot Cereals, assumed responsibility for research support for Quaker's New Ventures efforts, and developed the Consumer Monitoring Program to track consumer and marketplace trends. Before entering the corporate world, Dr. Thompson was an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University, where she received her Ph.D. in Social Psychology. Her research focuses on the trends in consumer attitudes and the linkage between attitude and behavior.