Appendix B Liaison Panel

Institute of Medicine (IOM) studies frequently rely on liaison panels to broaden the expertise of the committee, to inform interested and concerned parties about the study and its activities, and to provide a forum for discussion of the issues. In some studies, liaison panels may be given specific charges and asked to provide the committee with specific products. Other studies may never formally convene a meeting of the liaison panel, per se, but may work with the members of the panel informally and individually. Organizations nominate members of a liaison panel to speak on their behalf and to provide advice and assistance about the issues under consideration; because liaison panel members serve in an advisory capacity to the IOM formal committee, they may have known biases and conflicts of interest.

The IOM convened a liaison panel, comprising representatives of professional associations of nurses, related professional groups, hospitals and nursing homes, unions, and organizations that serve as advocates for nursing home residents. The panel met formally for a one-day meeting on August 1, 1994. It served in a consultative and information exchange capacity. Several members of the panel provided the committee with results of special surveys, specific informational material, and other background information from their organizations throughout the period of the study. They also helped to identify datasources, potential witnesses for the public hearing, and contacts for the committee's site visits.

Organizations represented on the liaison panel are listed below:



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--> Appendix B Liaison Panel Institute of Medicine (IOM) studies frequently rely on liaison panels to broaden the expertise of the committee, to inform interested and concerned parties about the study and its activities, and to provide a forum for discussion of the issues. In some studies, liaison panels may be given specific charges and asked to provide the committee with specific products. Other studies may never formally convene a meeting of the liaison panel, per se, but may work with the members of the panel informally and individually. Organizations nominate members of a liaison panel to speak on their behalf and to provide advice and assistance about the issues under consideration; because liaison panel members serve in an advisory capacity to the IOM formal committee, they may have known biases and conflicts of interest. The IOM convened a liaison panel, comprising representatives of professional associations of nurses, related professional groups, hospitals and nursing homes, unions, and organizations that serve as advocates for nursing home residents. The panel met formally for a one-day meeting on August 1, 1994. It served in a consultative and information exchange capacity. Several members of the panel provided the committee with results of special surveys, specific informational material, and other background information from their organizations throughout the period of the study. They also helped to identify datasources, potential witnesses for the public hearing, and contacts for the committee's site visits. Organizations represented on the liaison panel are listed below:

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--> Organization Representative American Association of Colleges of Nursing Polly Bednash American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Melissa A. Fitzpatrick American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging Evelyn F. Munley American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Kathleen Bean American Association of Retired Persons Alan Buckingham American Health Care Association Mary Kay Ousley American Hospital Association Marjorie Beyers American Licensed Practical Nurses Association Paul M. Tendler American Medical Directors Association Rebecca Elon American Nurses Association Geraldine Marullo American Nursing Assistants Association Steve P. Gorsline American Organization of Nurse Executives Diana Weaver Association for Federal, State and Municipal Employees Constance Brown Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations Carole H. Patterson National Association of Directors of Nursing Administration/LTC Joan C. Warden National Citizens' Coalition for Nursing Home Reform Sue Harang National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare Martha M. Mohler National Federation for Specialty Nursing Organizations Connie Whittington National League for Nursing Eloise Balasco Service Employees International Union Rhonda Goode