G Committee Biographies

NEAL A. VANSELOW, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine. He served as Chancellor of Tulane University Medical Center from 1989–1994 and as a Scholar-in-Residence at the Institute of Medicine during the 1994–1995 academic year. He has served as Chairman of the Department of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Professions Education at the University of Michigan, Dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Chancellor of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, and Vice President for Health Sciences at the University of Minnesota. He is an allergist who received his training in internal medicine and allergy-immunology at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Vanselow was chairperson of the Council on Graduate Medical Education (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), chairperson of the Board of Directors, Association of Academic Health Centers, and a member of the Pew Health Professions Commission. He has been a member of the Institute of Medicine since 1989 and has served as chair of the IOM Committee on the Future of Primary Care and co-chairperson of the IOM Committee on the U.S. Physician Supply. His areas of particular interest include the health care workforce and graduate medical education.

JOEL J. ALPERT, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health at Boston University School of Medicine, graduated from Yale College and Harvard Medical School. Following completion of pediatric training at Children's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, St. Mary's Hospital Medical School in London, and military service in the U.S. Army at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he returned to



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--> G Committee Biographies NEAL A. VANSELOW, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine. He served as Chancellor of Tulane University Medical Center from 1989–1994 and as a Scholar-in-Residence at the Institute of Medicine during the 1994–1995 academic year. He has served as Chairman of the Department of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Professions Education at the University of Michigan, Dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Chancellor of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, and Vice President for Health Sciences at the University of Minnesota. He is an allergist who received his training in internal medicine and allergy-immunology at the University of Michigan. Dr. Vanselow was chairperson of the Council on Graduate Medical Education (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), chairperson of the Board of Directors, Association of Academic Health Centers, and a member of the Pew Health Professions Commission. He has been a member of the Institute of Medicine since 1989 and has served as chair of the IOM Committee on the Future of Primary Care and co-chairperson of the IOM Committee on the U.S. Physician Supply. His areas of particular interest include the health care workforce and graduate medical education. JOEL J. ALPERT, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health at Boston University School of Medicine, graduated from Yale College and Harvard Medical School. Following completion of pediatric training at Children's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, St. Mary's Hospital Medical School in London, and military service in the U.S. Army at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he returned to

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--> Children's Hospital as a fellow in Child Health and Chief Resident. He has served as Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, Medical Director of The Harvard Family Health Care Program, Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine, and Director of Pediatrics at Boston City Hospital. He has authored 132 papers, 65 abstracts, and two books. His major work has been in primary care education, delivery, and health care for disadvantaged children. He co-authored Education of Physicians for Primary Care in 1973 with Evan Charney. He is a member of AOA at Boston University, a member of the Society for Pediatric Research, and the American Pediatric Society. He received the Job Lewis Award for Community Pediatrics in 1991 from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the George Armstrong Medal in 1988 from the Ambulatory Pediatric Association of which he was president in 1969. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and was on the governing council from 1992 to 1995. He has most recently been a member of the Institute of Medicine Board on Children and Families. CHERYL Y. BOYKINS is the Program Director of The Center For Black Women's Wellness (CBWW), a community-based self-help organization committed to improving the quality of life for women and their families through empowerment. A graduate of the University of Florida, Gainesville, she earned a B.A. degree in criminal justice. While completing undergraduate studies, she coordinated a continuing education program, job training and other support services as a correctional counselor in an innovative halfway house program designed to insure the smooth re-entry of incarcerated women into the community. In 1981, she began working as a health advocate at the Gainesville Women's Health Center. Ms. Boykins attended the first National Conference on Black Women's Health Issues in 1983 at Spelman College, and in 1985 attended the United Nations (UN) End of the Decade Conference for women held in Nairobi, Kenya. Realizing the possibility of working with other women who understood the dual oppression of race and gender, she returned to Atlanta to accept a position coordinating self-help groups in public housing. She has continued to implement programs that develop self-help groups among women while building relationships with other local health and social service agencies. She has combined her knowledge and experience of criminal justice systems and health care for women to develop a grassroots model program into a reality that supports women individually and collectively in their overall health care needs. Ms. Boykins and CBWW have been the recipient of many awards. She is currently a member of the Public Health Children's Initiative Task Force, Vice President of Parks and Recreation Advisory Council, Vice President for the Advisory

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--> Council of Summech Lane Trust and member of The Council of Elders for a Safe Place. CAROLYN V. BROWN, M.D., MPH, is board certified in both obstetrics-gynecology and preventive medicine. Her career is deeply rooted in the direct provision of primary care, rural and outreach health care, psychosocial issues of health, access of populations to health care, and teaching. Dr. Brown practiced in Alaska for 23 years at the private practice, institutional, academic, and public health levels of health care. She developed the first teaching curriculum for Alaska Native Health Aides. Her local and statewide work there involved women's primary health care issues, obstetric-gynecologic reproductive health care, and issues of psychosocial health care. Dr. Brown was assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Vermont College of Medicine from 1988 to 1994. In this work, she continued a commitment to teaching primary care for obstetric-gynecology residents and students. In addition, she developed and taught the College of Medicine class in ethics for five years. Outreach health care was developed and implemented within the Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology. She authored the Vermont State Guidelines for Sexual Assault Examinations as well as the Vermont Health Department Guidelines for Evaluation of Family (Domestic) Violence for hospitals, emergency departments, and other health care facilities in Vermont. She served on the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee in the development of The Obstetrician-Gynecologist and Primary-Preventive Health Care. She serves as chair of the ACOG District I Primary Care Committee. In 1995 Dr. Brown returned to private practice in Burlington, Vermont, and continues her work in direct patient care, teaching, writing, outreach health care, and local-state-national health arenas. PETE TONY DUARTE is Chief Executive Officer of Thomason Hospital in El Paso, Texas. Until 1992 he was Executive Director of Centro de Salud Familiar La Fe, Inc., El Paso, Texas, where he was responsible for administration and management of the largest community health center along the U.S./Mexico border. He has also directed the programs of Project Upward Bound for the University of Texas at El Paso and was Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology. He has been a management consultant to the U.S. government and local governments and has directed the implementation and evaluation of health services and community development projects. From 1965 to 1967 he was a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Dominican Republic. In 1964 he graduated from California State College, Hayward, with a

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--> B.A. in Social Sciences. He received an M.A. in Sociology from the University of Texas at El Paso. He has served on national committees and received many awards, including the Hispanic Magazine ''Science Award," The National Conference of Christians and Jews "Extra Miler Award" in 1994, and the L.U.L.A.C. and District IV "Humanitarian Award" in 1995. He served as Board Member of COSSMHO in 1996. PETER K. ELLSWORTH was elected President and Chief Executive Officer of Sharp HealthCare in March 1986. For 27 years prior to 1986 as an attorney in private practice, he represented Sharp on various matters. At the time of his appointment to Sharp as CEO, Mr. Ellsworth was president of the law firm of Ellsworth, Corbett, Seitman & McLeod, now known as Lindley, Lazar & Scales. Mr. Ellsworth received his undergraduate and law degrees from Stanford University. Mr. Ellsworth is a member of the Executive Committee of the Greater San Diego Chamber of Commerce and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Chamber's CEO Roundtable. He served as President of Quality Net—a consortium of the largest not-for-profit hospitals in San Diego. RAYMOND S. GARRISON, D.D.S., M.S., is associate professor and chairman of the Department of Dentistry at Bowman Gray School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Dr. Garrison has been a member of the Department of Dentistry since 1981 and has served as Chairman since 1992. Dr. Garrison received his B.S. degree from Davidson College and his D.D.S. degree from the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry. After finishing his undergraduate dental education, Dr. Garrison completed a one-year rotating dental internship at Baltimore City Hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. The internship was followed by a three-year anesthesia residency at Baltimore City Hospitals and the University of Maryland. During his anesthesia training, Dr. Garrison completed a master's degree in pharmacology at the University of Maryland. Dr. Garrison became a full-time faculty member of the University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy in Baltimore in 1974. In 1978 Dr. Garrison joined the full-time faculty at East Carolina University School of Medicine in Greenville, North Carolina. At East Carolina Dr. Garrison started a general practice residency program within the Department of Family Medicine. In 1981 Dr. Garrison joined the full-time faculty at the Bowman Gray School of Medicine in the Department of Dentistry. Dr. Garrison is active in many national organizations and committees. He is a fellow of the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology, the Academy of General Dentistry, the American Association of Hospital Dentists, and the American College of Dentists. He has a particular interest in accreditation, financing, and general practice residency educational programming in the hospital environment

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--> as well as in issues at the interface of medicine and dentistry. These include managed dental care reimbursement plans, access and treatment outcomes research, and integrated medical information systems. Other research areas include the teaching and use of conscious sedation in dentistry and complex restorative and esthetic dentistry. LARRY A. GREEN, M.D., is Professor and Woodward-Chisholm Chairman of Family Practice at the University of Colorado. He is a graduate of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Green completed his residency in Family Medicine at the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital in 1976. Among the honors he has received are the American Board of Family Practice, Diplomate, 1976; recertified 1982 and 1989. Dr. Green's memberships include the Institute of Medicine; the American Academy of Family Physicians, North American Primary Care Research Group; Society of Teachers of Family Medicine; International Primary Care Network; Association of Departments of Family Medicine; Ambulatory Sentinel Practice Network. Dr. Green's major research interest is practice-based research. He has co-authored numerous publications relating to family practice medicine. PAUL F. GRINER, M.D., is Vice President and Director of the Center for the Assessment and Management of Change in Academic Medicine (CAMCAM), Association of American Medical Colleges. This Center was formed in 1995 to analyze the impact of the changing health care environment on the academic programs of the nation's medical schools and teaching hospitals and to assist these institutions in managing the changes necessary to ensure the preservation of their academic and social missions. A graduate of Harvard College, Dr. Griner received his M.D. degree, with honor, at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in 1959. He completed an internship and residency in Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital and served as medical chief resident and fellow in hematology at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester. He remained on the faculty at Rochester, rising to the rank of Professor and held the Samuel E. Durand Chair in Medicine. From 1984 until 1995, he was General Director and Chief Executive Officer of Strong Memorial Hospital, the 720-bed teaching hospital of the University of Rochester. As a nationally recognized authority on medical decisionmaking and the delivery of health services, Dr. Griner has published and lectured extensively on improving the efficiency and effectiveness of diagnosis and management, the assessment of medical technology, and directions in health policy. He has been a leader in the development of hospital programs designed to improve the quality and efficiency of patient care and chaired the efforts of a consortium of 12 university teaching hospitals to build the clinical information infrastructure needed to achieve these goals. Dr. Griner participates in many professional organizations, most notably the

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--> American College of Physicians, an association of approximately 85,000 internists, the largest medical specialty organization in the world. He served as both Chair of the Board and President of this organization, completing his term in 1995. Dr. Griner is also active in the Institute of Medicine and the Academic Medical Center Consortium (founding Chairman of the Board). He was a member of the New York State Governor's Health Care Advisory Board from 1990 to 1995 and served on the Mayoral Commission on the Health and Hospitals Corporation of the City of New York. JEAN JOHNSON, RN-C, Ph.D., currently serves as Associate Dean of the Health Sciences Programs at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. She has been extensively involved in and provided national leadership in nurse practitioner education through her work with program development and as a commissioner on the Pew Health Professions Commission. She has also been an active participant in legislative and regulatory policy formulation to enhance the role of nurse practitioners through decreasing barriers to practice. Dr. Johnson has also been a long-time advocate for improved care of the elderly, particularly those in nursing homes. She has worked to establish national standards for nurse assistant training and developed a nationally recognized educational program for this training. She currently maintains a clinical practice at a community clinic in Washington, D.C. Dr. Johnson serves as a member of the Pew Health Professions Commission and Fetzer Foundation's Work Force to develop psychosocial curriculum for health professions. She is also the National Project Director for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Partnership in Training Initiative. P. EUGENE JONES, Ph.D., PA-C, is Associate Professor and Physician Assistant Program Director at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. He was a U.S. Navy hospital corpsman during the Vietnam era and completed physician assistant training in 1975. He has 15 years' experience as a physician assistant educator. He earned a B.S. in physician assistant studies from the University of Nebraska College of Medicine, an M.A. in health services management from Webster College in St. Louis, Missouri, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in education from the Clarement Graduate School in Claremont, California. His research interests include physician assistant practice in primary care and medically underserved communities. HENK LAMBERTS, M.D., Ph.D., attended the University of Utrecht Medical School and the Medical School of Rotterdam (1958–1965) and received his Ph.D. from Leiden University in 1968. He founded the Ommoord Health Center in Rotterdam. He has been Professor of Family Medicine (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands) since 1984. His main areas of interest are the development of

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--> the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) and its application in episode-oriented epidemiology in international family practice. This is now reflected in an epidemiological program (Trans) based on the data from the Transition Project—a large routine morbidity database in the Netherlands—and the introduction of an expert system-driven computer-based patient record (Transhis) for family practice that is in use in several countries. Together with Maurice Wood (Virginia, U.S.) and Inge Hofmans-Okkes (Amsterdam, Netherlands) he is editor of ICPC in the European Community With a Multilanguage Layer. He is also the author of a Dutch textbook on Family Medicine. Dr. Lamberts has been a Foreign Associate Member of the IOM since 1993. PAUL W. NANNIS is Senior Program Officer at The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. During the IOM Study on the Future of Primary Care he was Commissioner of Health, City of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He was Executive Director of the 16th Street Community Health Center from 1976 to 1979. He received a B.A. degree from Marietta College in Ohio and an M.S.W. from the University of Wisconsin. He is a member of many professional organizations and has served on boards and blue ribbon committees, including the Medical College of Wisconsin's Health Policy Institute, the Advisory Board of the School of Social Welfare at the University of Wisconsin and the National Health Service Corps Advisory Council for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. R. HEATHER PALMER, M.B., B.Ch., S.M., is Director of the Center for Quality of Care Research and Education (QCRE) in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. A pediatrician by training, Dr. Palmer turned early in her career to health services research and became a faculty member in the Department of Health Policy and Management at HSPH. Her prior research focused on evaluation of quality in ambulatory health care. Dr. Palmer is currently leading a research project funded by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research called Understanding and Choosing Clinical Performance Measures for Quality Improvement: Development of a Typology as Principal Investigator and subcontractor to Mikalix & Co. She is also an investigator in collaboration with colleagues at the Beth Israel Hospital, on a study to validate the complications screening program. Dr. Palmer also writes, speaks, and teaches about the theory and practice of quality of care measurement. Her book, Ambulatory Health Care Evaluation: Principles and Practice, has become a classic in the field. Her paper on defining and measuring quality for the IOM's Committee on "Medicare: A Strategy for Quality Assurance" is included in Striving for Quality in Health Care: An Inquiry into Policy and Practice. She also contributed the chapter on "Quality Management in Ambulatory Care" to Health Care Quality Management for the

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--> 21st Century, and a chapter on "Quality Improvement/Quality Assurance Taxonomy: A Framework for the Conference" in Putting Research to Work in Quality Improvement. Dr. Palmer has contributed to policymaking about measurement of performance in health care through consultation to organizations in the public and private sector. She is on the Board of the Center for Clinical Quality Evaluation (CCQE) and on the Board of the Massachusetts Peer Review Organization. She serves on the National Performance Measurement Council of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), and on the American Medical Association (AMA) Expert Consultant Panel for Physician Performance Assessment, and for the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council (NAS/NRC) on a Study on Performance Measures and Data for Public Health Performance Partnership Grants. She is also the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the International Society for Quality in Health Care. Dr. Palmer earned her baccalaureate degree from Cambridge University, her M.B. and B.Ch. degrees (equivalent to the United States M.D. degree) from Cambridge University and the London Hospital Medical College, and a Master of Science degree in Health Services Administration from the Harvard School of Public Health. BARBARA ROSS-LEE, D.O., is Dean of the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine. In 1990, she became the first osteopathic physician to participate in the prestigious Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship, where she served as Legislative Assistant for Health to Senator Bill Bradley. In August 1993, she was named Dean of the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine—the first African-American woman to head a U.S. medical school. Ross-Lee has a strong background in health policy issues and serves as an adviser on primary care, medical education, and health care reform issues on the federal and state levels. After receiving her Doctor of Osteopathy degree from the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1973, she ran a busy family practice in inner-city Detroit for 10 years. She has worked throughout her career to address the health care needs of vulnerable populations—in particular, women, children, and minorities. This commitment mirrors the overriding mission of the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine: to provide primary care physicians for the underserved areas of Ohio. In June 1994, Ross-Lee was appointed to a four-year term with the 18-member National Advisory Committee on Rural Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Ross-Lee is a Fellow of the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians, Director of the American Osteopathic Association Certificate Program in Health Policy, and a member of the Executive Committee of the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. In addition to other awards, Ross-Lee received the Women's Health Award

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--> from Blackboard African-American National Bestsellers for her contributions to women's health and the "Magnificent 7" award presented by Business and Professional Women/USA. The latter award honors seven women in America who have made exceptional contributions to business and workplace equity. SHEILA A. RYAN, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N, came to the University of Rochester in September 1986 from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, where she was Associate Professor and Dean from 1980 to 1986. During her tenure as Dean and Professor, School of Nursing and Director, Medical Center Nursing at the University of Rochester, she has been responsible for a reorganization of faculty governance, expansion of faculty tracks for promotion, the development of a strategic plan for the School of Nursing, the initiation of the Community Nursing Center, and program management and advancement of the Commonwealth Fund Executive Nursing Fellowship Program. Dr. Ryan earned her B.S.N. from the University of Nebraska, her M.S.N. in Psychiatric Nursing from the University of California, San Francisco, and her Ph.D. in clinical nursing research from the University of Arizona. She received the Citation for Alumnus Achievement Award in 1989, and was elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing in 1987, and elected to the Institute of Medicine, 1992 and as treasurer of the National League for Nursing in 1993. She has received numerous awards for Outstanding University Teaching and Professional Advancement. Locally, regionally, and nationally, Dr. Ryan lectures in the areas of health care reform, informatics, faculty practice, and financial models of managed care. Dr. Ryan is a past member of the Advisory Committee of the Pew Charitable Trust's Health Professions Commission, and currently serves on the Health of the Public National Advisory Committee. She serves as an adviser to several corporate organizations, numerous national foundations, is a board member for local health institutions and has served on many community commissions. RICHARD M. SCHEFFLER, Ph.D., is Professor of Health Economics and Public Policy at the School of Public Health and the Graduate School of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley. He is the director of the Robert Wood Johnson Scholars in Health Policy Research Program and the Chair of the doctoral program in Health Services and Policy Analysis. Dr. Scheffler was a Fulbright scholar in the Czech Republic in 1993 and the founding director of a National Institute of Mental Health Research Center on the Organization and Financing of Care for the Severely Mentally Ill. Before coming to Berkeley in 1981, he was on the staff of the IOM and was the study director of the 1978 IOM report, A Manpower Policy for Primary Health Care. Dr. Scheffler has taught classes in health economics and public policy, health services research, international health care economics and micro-economics. His published research includes

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--> studies of health care workforce policy, managed care, the economics of preventive health measures, and mental health care delivery systems. WILLIAM L. WINTERS, JR., M.D., is board certified in cardiovascular diseases and internal medicine and is Professor of Medicine and Deputy Chief in the Department of Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. He is also on the Senior Attending Staff at the Methodist Hospital and has been on the Board of Directors and President of the Medical Staff. He received a B.S. degree from Northwestern University and an M.S. from Temple University. He received his M.D. from Northwestern University Medical School. Dr. Winters did an internship at Philadelphia General Hospital, a residency in internal medicine, and a fellowship in cardiology at Temple University Hospital. He was a Director of the Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, the General Clinical Research Center, and the Cardiac Care Unit between 1961 and 1968 at Temple University School of Medicine. Dr. Winters is a member of many professional societies. He was President of the American College of Cardiology from 1990 to 1991. He was also President of the American Heart Association, Houston Chapter, from 1975 to 1976. Dr. Winters has received awards from the American Heart Association and has served on the editorial boards of several cardiology journals.

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