Biographic Sketches of Committee Members

CHARLES F. STEVENS, M.D., Ph.D. (Chairman), is a professor and investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Salk Institute, La Jolla, California. Dr. Stevens is internationally respected for his research work in neurobiology specializing in synaptic transmission and properties of excitable membranes. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member and past member of several committees of the National Academy of Sciences and of the Institute of Medicine.

DAVID A. SAVITZ, Ph.D. (Vice Chairman), is a professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is an epidemiologist specializing in occupational and environmental exposures in relation to reproductive outcomes and cancer. He has directed two major epidemiologic studies of EMF and cancer, one concerning residential exposures and childhood cancer and the other evaluating magnetic fields and cancer in electric utility workers. Other research activities focus on the causes of preterm delivery and pregnancy complications and health effects of pesticides. He is an editor of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

LARRY E. ANDERSON, Ph.D., is a staff scientist at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. He is a specialist in neurochemistry with research experience in axoplasmic transport; protease-isolation and mechanisms of action; growth regulation-neural cells and neurotoxicity; and biological rhythms and



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Possible Health Effects of Exposure to Residential Electric and Magnetic Fields Biographic Sketches of Committee Members CHARLES F. STEVENS, M.D., Ph.D. (Chairman), is a professor and investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Salk Institute, La Jolla, California. Dr. Stevens is internationally respected for his research work in neurobiology specializing in synaptic transmission and properties of excitable membranes. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member and past member of several committees of the National Academy of Sciences and of the Institute of Medicine. DAVID A. SAVITZ, Ph.D. (Vice Chairman), is a professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is an epidemiologist specializing in occupational and environmental exposures in relation to reproductive outcomes and cancer. He has directed two major epidemiologic studies of EMF and cancer, one concerning residential exposures and childhood cancer and the other evaluating magnetic fields and cancer in electric utility workers. Other research activities focus on the causes of preterm delivery and pregnancy complications and health effects of pesticides. He is an editor of the American Journal of Epidemiology. LARRY E. ANDERSON, Ph.D., is a staff scientist at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. He is a specialist in neurochemistry with research experience in axoplasmic transport; protease-isolation and mechanisms of action; growth regulation-neural cells and neurotoxicity; and biological rhythms and

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Possible Health Effects of Exposure to Residential Electric and Magnetic Fields pineal gland function. Dr. Anderson has had extensive experience in EMF research, including the development and use of exposure systems for in vitro and whole animal studies. He serves on a number of national and international committees on EMF and health, including the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP), International Conference on High Voltage Systems (CICVS), International Member of Radio Science, Commission K (USRI), and the World Health Organization working group (WHO). DANIEL A. DRISCOLL, Ph.D., is a licensed professional engineer (New York), specialist in electrical and biomedical engineering, and an employee of the State of New York Department of Public Service. He serves as head of the department's electric and magnetic fields task force. He has had extensive experience in the evaluation of environmental electric and magnetic fields and in the interaction of engineering principles, regulatory issues, and public policy. FRED H. GAGE, Ph.D., is a professor in the Laboratory of Genetics at the Salk Institute, La Jolla, California. He has conducted extensive studies aimed at treatment of central nervous system disorders, such as the use of gene therapy using intracerebral grafting of genetically modified fibroblasts and the use of neural transplants. His recent research focus has been on molecular and cellular approaches to understanding neurological factors in aging and Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Gage is particularly interested in alterations to the central nervous system that may lead to behavioral and/or learning disabilities. RICHARD L. GARWIN, Ph.D., is a fellow emeritus of the Thomas J. Watson Research Center, IBM Research Division, Yorktown Heights, New York. His research has contributed to many scientific advances, including work involving instruments and electronics for research in nuclear and low-temperature physics, the establishment of the nonconservation of parity and the demonstration of some of its striking consequences, computer elements and systems, superconducting devices, communication systems, the behavior of solid helium, the detection of gravitational radiation, the design of nuclear weapons, and military technology. He has written numerous books, published over 200 articles and has been granted 42 U.S. patents. Dr. Garwin has served on numerous advisory committees and panels, among them the President's Science Advisory Committee (1962-65 and 1969-72) and the Defense Science Board (1966-69). He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received from the U.S. government the 1996 R.V. Jones Intelligence Award for "scientific acumen, applied with art, in the cause of freedom."

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Possible Health Effects of Exposure to Residential Electric and Magnetic Fields LYNN W. JELINSKI, Ph.D., is director of biotechnology and a professor of engineering at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, having moved there in 1991 after 11 years at the AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Jelinski's research interests include the application of microscopic MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and solid state NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) to problems in biophysics. She has investigated images of rapid arterial blood flow, developed double-quantum sodium imaging technology at biorelevant concentrations, and published extensively on the structure on macromolecules as determined by NMR. BRUCE J. KELMAN, Ph.D., a diplomat of the American Board of Toxicology, is the national director of health and environmental sciences for Golder Associates, Inc., Redmond, Washington and an adjunct professor at New Mexico State University. His research interests have focused on issues in reproduction and development including the toxicology of both chemicals and radiation (ionizing and non-ionizing). He has published extensively on transplacental movements of materials (metals and chemicals) and the effects of toxic agents on that movement, effects of ultrasound on placental blood flow and function, and the toxicology of static and ELF electric and magnetic fields. His research has included teratology and life span studies of whole animals exposed to static magnetic fields. RICHARD A. LUBEN, Ph.D., is an associate professor of biomedical sciences and biochemistry at the University of California, Riverside. His research activities have focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms of hormone action, with emphasis on electromagnetic effects on membrane signal transduction processes. He has also studied the molecular endocrinology of calcium and phosphate homeostasis and bone healing. Dr. Luben is a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and also serves on NCRP Subcommittees 89-3 and 89-5 for Bioeffects and RF Radiation. He has served as member and chair of NIH Special Study Section on Bioelectromagnetics and he is a member of the Radiation Study Section. Dr. Luben is president-elect of the Bioelectromagnetics Society. RUSSEL J. REITER, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio. His research focus is neuroendocrinology, especially the pineal gland and reproductive physiology, brain chemistry, and behavior. Dr. Reiter's recent research interests have included the effects of circadian-rhythm on pineal gland function and its interrelation with the immune system. Dr. Reiter was an author of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities report (1992) on Health Effects of Electromagnetic Fields commissioned by the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC).

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Possible Health Effects of Exposure to Residential Electric and Magnetic Fields PAUL SLOVIC, Ph.D., is president of Decision Research and a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon. He studies human judgment, decision making, and risk analysis. During the past 15 years, Dr. Slovic and his colleagues have developed methods to describe risk perceptions and measure their impacts on individuals, industry, and society. They created a taxonomic system that enables one to understand and predict perceived risk, attitudes toward regulation, and impacts resulting from accidents or failures. Dr. Slovic publishes extensively and serves as consultant to companies and government agencies. He is past president of the Society for Risk Analysis and in 1991 received its Distinguished Contribution Award. He also serves on the Board of Directors for the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. In 1993 he received the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association, and in 1995 received the Outstanding Contribution to Science Award from the Oregon Academy of Science. JAN A. J. STOLWIJK, Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology and acting chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. He has published extensively on epidemiology and studies of risk assessment for a broad range of topics including indoor air pollution, the proximity to hazardous waste sites, smoking and indoor radon exposure, and exposure to EMF. His specialties include regulatory systems in physiology, thermal receptor structures, and the construction and application of mathematical models for the study of complex physiological systems. Dr. Stolwijk has been active in the study of effects of heat on animal response and has worked with international groups (WHO) in this area. He also has a broad level of experience in studies of the health effects of exposure to EMF having served on an international working group concerned with the health effects of non-ionizing radiation and chaired an ad-hoc committee for the Connecticut Academy of Sciences and Engineering to review potential health effects of EMF. MARIA A. STUCHLY is a professor and NSERC/BC Hydro/TransAlta Industrial Research Chair in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Her research interests are in numerical and experimental modeling of physical interactions of electromagnetic fields with living systems. She has published extensively in the areas of tissue electrical properties, radio frequency dosimetry and safety standards, and medical applications. Dr. Stuchly is a fellow of the IEEE. DANIEL WARTENBERG, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Community Medicine at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, where he directs the epidemiology and quantiative methods track in the New Jersey graduate program in public health. His research addresses methodological issues in the conduct of epidemiologic research and risk assessment,

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Possible Health Effects of Exposure to Residential Electric and Magnetic Fields including issues of analysis, computerization, data base management, modeling, and geographic patterns. He has published extensively on the statistical evaluation of disease clusters. Issues he has studied include effects of exposure to toxic chemicals, pesticides, and EMF. In addition, he serves as a member of the New Jersey Governor's Commission on Radiation Protection. JOHN S. WAUGH, Ph.D., is a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research has concentrated on the theory of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and its applications to chemistry, with recent emphasis on NMR spectroscopy at temperatures below 0.01 K and the theory of spin dynamics. He is the author of one book and about 200 research papers. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is the recipient of a number of honors including the Langmuir Award, the Pauling and Richards Medals, and the Wolf Prize. JERRY R. WILLIAMS, Sc.D., is a professor of oncology at The John Hopkins University Oncology Center, Baltimore, Maryland. His research specialty is in cellular and molecular biology with a focus on physiology and radiobiology. He has published extensively on mutagenesis, radiolabeled antibodies, DNA topoisomerases, and models of sister chromatid exchange. His most recent work has involved sensitization processes in human tumor cells and the use of monoclonal antibodies for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. He has extensive experience in studies of ionizing radiation and the mechanisms of cancer induction, progression, and treatment.