APPENDIX B
Biographical Sketches

JANE MENKEN (Cochair) is UPS Foundation professor in the social sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, where she was director of the Population Studies Center from 1989 to 1995. Her main area of research is fertility; she has developed mathematical models of reproduction and analytic techniques and has carried out studies of the increase in sterility as women age, of fertility determinants in Bangladesh, and of teenage pregnancy and childbearing in the United States. She has a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania (1960), an M.S. from the Harvard School of Public Health in biostatistics (1962), and a Ph.D. in sociology and demography from Princeton University (1975). She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1990, and the Institute of Medicine in 1995. She is a member of the board of directors of the Alan Guttmacher Institute and the advisory committee to the director of the National Institutes of Health. She has served on numerous committees of the National Research Council since 1977, including the Committee on Population and Demography; the Committee on Population; and the Committee on AIDS Research Needs in the Social, Behavioral, and Statistical Sciences. She is also a member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education.

JAMES TRUSSELL (Cochair) is professor of economics and public affairs, director of the Office of Population Research, and associate dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He is the author or coauthor of more than 140 scientific publications, primarily in the areas of demographic methodology and reproductive health. He has a B.S. in



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Preventing and Mitigating AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: Research and Data Priorities for the Social and Behavioral Sciences APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches JANE MENKEN (Cochair) is UPS Foundation professor in the social sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, where she was director of the Population Studies Center from 1989 to 1995. Her main area of research is fertility; she has developed mathematical models of reproduction and analytic techniques and has carried out studies of the increase in sterility as women age, of fertility determinants in Bangladesh, and of teenage pregnancy and childbearing in the United States. She has a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania (1960), an M.S. from the Harvard School of Public Health in biostatistics (1962), and a Ph.D. in sociology and demography from Princeton University (1975). She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1990, and the Institute of Medicine in 1995. She is a member of the board of directors of the Alan Guttmacher Institute and the advisory committee to the director of the National Institutes of Health. She has served on numerous committees of the National Research Council since 1977, including the Committee on Population and Demography; the Committee on Population; and the Committee on AIDS Research Needs in the Social, Behavioral, and Statistical Sciences. She is also a member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. JAMES TRUSSELL (Cochair) is professor of economics and public affairs, director of the Office of Population Research, and associate dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He is the author or coauthor of more than 140 scientific publications, primarily in the areas of demographic methodology and reproductive health. He has a B.S. in

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Preventing and Mitigating AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: Research and Data Priorities for the Social and Behavioral Sciences mathematics from Davidson College (1971), a B.Phil. in economics from Oxford University (1973), and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University (1975). He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a member of the board of directors of the Population Association of American and the Alan Guttmacher Institute. KOFI AWUSABO-ASARE is a senior lecturer in population and medical geography at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. His research interests are in population policy formulation and implementation and the social dimensions of HIV/AIDS infection. His work in HIV/AIDS is part of the West African Research Network on Sexual Networking. He participated in the Ghana segment of the Agenda for Improving the Implementation of Population Programs in Africa in the early 1990s. He is currently a member of the Technical Committee on Population Policy of the Ghana National Population Council. He has a B.A. from the University of Cape Coast, an M.A. in demography from the Australian National University in Canberra, and a Ph.D. from the University of Liverpool. JOHN G. CLELAND is professor of medical demography at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He has long-standing interests in fertility, family planning, and child survival in developing countries and has published widely on these subjects. He recently assisted the Global Programme on AIDS at the World Health Organization (WHO) in the design and analysis of surveys on sexual behavior and coedited a book on the main results. He currently serves on committees of WHO's Human Reproduction Programme, of Macro International's Demographic and Health Surveys Programme, and of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. BARNEY COHEN is study director of the Panel on Data and Research Priorities for Arresting AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa. Since 1992 he has served as program officer with the Committee on Population of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences, working on a variety of projects on adolescent fertility and overall population dynamics in sub-Saharan Africa, the demography of Senegal, the demography of North American Indians, and the relationship between infant and child mortality and fertility. Between 1982 and 1986 he lived and worked in The Sudan, and he has authored or coauthored a number of scientific papers on the functioning of urban labor markets in Khartoum. He has a B.Sc. (hons.) in pure mathematics and statistics from the University College of Wales (1980), an M.A. in economics from the University of Delaware (1987), and a Ph.D. in demography from the University of California, Berkeley (1991). CARL KENDALL is associate professor in the Department of International Health and Development and director of the HIV/AIDS Track at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine; he is also adjunct

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Preventing and Mitigating AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: Research and Data Priorities for the Social and Behavioral Sciences professor in the Department of International Health at The John Hopkins University. He was founding director of the Center for International Community-based Health Research at The Johns Hopkins University and served as chief of the Behavioral Science Unit's AIDS Control and Prevention Project from 1991 to 1993. He serves on the Commission on AIDS and Education of the American Anthropological Association. His research interests are in the methodology and conduct of health intervention research, particularly applications of qualitative methodologies, and in social network analysis. He has conducted several interventions and evaluations and is now involved in evaluations of a condom social marketing program in Louisiana, of the Zambia HIV/AIDS Project, and of a large health sector project that includes STD/HIV interventions in Honduras. He is a member of the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Medical Anthropology and a fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology. He has a B.A. in sociology and anthropology from Swarthmore College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in social anthropology from the University of Rochester. PETER R. LAMPTEY is senior vice president of AIDS programs at Family Health International in Arlington, Virginia. He is also director of the AIDSCAP project, which is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. A physician who has worked in public health positions in developing countries for 20 years, he has served as a lecturer in the Ghana Medical School for the past 10 years. He has been actively involved in AIDS prevention and was the director of the AIDSTECH project, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. He has an M.D. from the University of Ghana Medical School and received training in public health at the University of California, Los Angeles; Harvard University; and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. EUSTACE P.Y. MUHONDWA is host country social scientist and resident advisor with the Population Council in the Tanzania Office and associate professor of behavioral sciences at the Institute of Public Health of Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Between 1992 and 1994, he was the director of the Institute of Public Health. Previously he served as head of the Behavioral Sciences Department in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Dar es Salaam. His research interests are in health promotion, focusing on understanding the impediments to and seeking alternative approaches for health promotion; he has dealt with maternal and child health, primary health care, leprosy, and AIDS. He has served on the medical and public health committee of the Commission for Science and Technology in Tanzania and on the first and last steering committees on social and behavioral research of the World Health Organization's Global Programme on AIDS. He has B.A. and M.A. degrees in sociology from the University of Dar es Salaam and M. Med. Sci. and Ph.D. degrees in community medicine from the University of Nottingham, U.K.

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Preventing and Mitigating AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: Research and Data Priorities for the Social and Behavioral Sciences A. MEAD OVER is senior economist in the Policy Research Department of The World Bank in Washington, D.C. After teaching econometrics and health economics at Williams College from 1975 to 1981 and at Boston University from 1981 to 1985, he joined The World Bank as a health economist in 1986. Since 1987 he has written and lectured on the economic impact of AIDS at both the micro and macro levels and on the costs and effects of alternative approaches to controlling HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. He is the principal investigator of a research project on the impact of AIDS on households in Kagera, Tanzania. After receiving a B.A. degree from Dartmouth College in 1967, he spent 2 years in the Peace Corps in Burkina Faso and 1 year as a foreign scholar at the Institut National de la Récherche Agronomique in Paris. Subsequently he pursued doctoral studies in economics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, obtaining a Ph.D. in 1978. He is a member of the American Economic Association and the Population Association of America. THOMAS C. QUINN is professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and also senior investigator in the Laboratory of Immunoregulation at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He has adjunct appointments as professor of international health and molecular microbiology and immunology at The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. His research interests include international studies on the epidemiology, virology, and immunopathogenesis of HIV infection. He has conducted a number of studies in sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America examining the factors related to heterosexual and perinatal transmission of HIV infection. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in biology from the University of Notre Dame and an M.D. from Northwestern University School of Medicine. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the Infectious Disease Society of America. He is a panel member of the Food and Drug Administration's Antiretroviral Review Committee and of the U.S.-Japan Cooperative Medical Science Program on AIDS and Related Retroviruses. He serves on the editorial board of a number of journals related to research on AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. DEBORAH L. RUGG is a supervisory research psychologist in the Program Evaluation Branch of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, which is within the National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. She has authored or coauthored more than 30 publications, primarily in the areas of evaluation methodology and HIV prevention with adolescents and HIV counseling and testing. She has a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin (1975) in physiological psychology; an M.A. from San Diego State University (1977) in experimental psychology; and a Ph.D. from the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine (1982) in health psychology. She was an assistant professor of health psychology at the

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Preventing and Mitigating AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: Research and Data Priorities for the Social and Behavioral Sciences University of California, San Francisco, and San Diego State University for 5 years prior to joining the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1987 as an epidemic intelligence service officer in the Division of HIV/STD Prevention. In 1991 she became the evaluation research section chief in the Division of Adolescent and School Health and focused her research on adolescent HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy prevention intervention development and evaluation. She continues to focus her research on evaluation methods in assessing the effectiveness of interventions targeting adolescent sexual risk behavior. DANIEL TARANTOLA is director of the International AIDS Program at the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center of Health and Human Rights of the Harvard School of Public Health, where he has been a lecturer in population and international health since 1991. He has an M.D. from Paris University and did postgraduate training in nephrology and epidemiology. Over a period of 17 years through 1991, he participated in the launching of several global initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO): childhood immunization; the prevention and control of diarrheal diseases and of acute respiratory infections; and, in 1987, the Global Programme on AIDS. He is a coeditor of AIDS in the World—the first global report on the HIV/AIDS pandemic, published in 1992—and is coeditor of the forthcoming second volume of this publication. JUDITH WASSERHEIT is the director of the Division of STD Prevention in the National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. She is responsible for developing and directing CDC's national STD prevention programs and related research in behavioral science, epidemiology and surveillance, health services, and program evaluation. Previously, she was the first chief of the STD Branch at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. She has a B.A. from Princeton University (1974), an M.D. from Harvard Medical School (1978), and an M.P.H. from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health (1989). She has published extensively on clinical and epidemiological aspects of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV prevention, particularly in relation to women's health, and is a member of the executive board of the American Venereal Disease Association and the Board of the International Society for STD Research. MARIA J. WAWER is associate clinical professor of public health and director of the International Operations Research Program within the Center for Population and Family Health of the School of Public Health at Columbia University; she is also a faculty associate in the Department of Population Dynamics of the School of Hygiene and Public Health at The Johns Hopkins University. She is currently the principal investigator on a number of research projects on AIDS prevention and reproductive health, including a project on STD control for AIDS

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Preventing and Mitigating AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: Research and Data Priorities for the Social and Behavioral Sciences prevention in Rakai District, Uganda, supported principally by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. She has worked on family planning, AIDS, and reproductive health issues in more than 10 African countries, as well as in Latin America and Asia. She has a B.Sc. in biology from the University of New Brunswick (1974), an M.D. from McMaster University (1977), and an M.H.Sc. from the University of Toronto (1979). She is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada. PETER O. WAY is a senior research analyst in the International Programs Center of the U.S. Bureau of the Census in Washington, D.C. Currently he is involved in the analysis of HIV trends worldwide and in the estimation and projection of the current and future impact of AIDS epidemics. He was responsible for the development of the HIV/AIDS Surveillance Data Base and has collaborated in the development of a mathematical model of the AIDS epidemic, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State. He has given numerous presentations at major international AIDS meetings on worldwide HIV trends and on the demographic and economic impact of AIDS epidemics. His publications include chapters in several books, a monograph on the reliability of demographic estimates for Africa, and numerous articles on the current trends and projected impact of AIDS epidemics. He has a B.A. in sociology from St. Louis University (1971) and an M.A. (1973) and Ph.D. (1977) in sociology, both from the University of Chicago. DEBREWORK ZEWDIE is reproductive health specialist and the AIDS/STD coordinator for the Human Development Department of the World Bank in Washington, D.C. Previously she held a number of public health positions in which she provided research and technical assistance on AIDS prevention and control, reproductive health, and sexually transmitted diseases. She was deputy regional director for the Africa Region of the AIDS Control and Prevention Project of Family Health International in Nairobi, Kenya; program manager of the AIDS/STD Prevention and Control Program of Ethiopia; deputy director of the National Research Institute of Health in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; and head of the Referral Laboratory for AIDS in Addis Ababa. She consulted for the Global Programme on AIDS from 1989 to 1990 and has participated in the development of Medium-Term Plans and national serosurveillance in several countries in Africa. She has a B.Sc. in biology from Addis Ababa University and a Ph.D. in immunology from the University of London.

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