Appendix J Committee and Staff Biographies

Committee

NANCY E. ADLER, Ph.D., is vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry and director of the Health Psychology Program, both at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). In addition, she is professor of medical psychology in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at UCSF. She received her B.A. in psychology from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. in social psychology from Harvard University. Between 1972 and 1977, Dr. Adler was assistant professor and associate professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Among her many honors, Dr. Adler has been elected a fellow of four divisions of the American Psychological Association, and she is a member of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. She was elected to the IOM in 1994. Dr. Adler conducts research in the area of health psychology. She has published extensively on the psychosocial aspects of abortion, including the emotional responses of women following therapeutic abortion, on unintended pregnancy in adolescent and adult women, and on reproductive and contraceptive decision-making among adolescents. Her recent work is examining the influence of socioeconomic status on health.

E. RICHARD BROWN, Ph.D., is founder and director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, and he is professor of public health in the UCLA School of Public Health. He is also president of the American Public Health Association. Dr. Brown received his Ph.D. in sociology of education from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Brown has written extensively about a broad range of



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--> Appendix J Committee and Staff Biographies Committee NANCY E. ADLER, Ph.D., is vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry and director of the Health Psychology Program, both at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). In addition, she is professor of medical psychology in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at UCSF. She received her B.A. in psychology from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. in social psychology from Harvard University. Between 1972 and 1977, Dr. Adler was assistant professor and associate professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Among her many honors, Dr. Adler has been elected a fellow of four divisions of the American Psychological Association, and she is a member of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. She was elected to the IOM in 1994. Dr. Adler conducts research in the area of health psychology. She has published extensively on the psychosocial aspects of abortion, including the emotional responses of women following therapeutic abortion, on unintended pregnancy in adolescent and adult women, and on reproductive and contraceptive decision-making among adolescents. Her recent work is examining the influence of socioeconomic status on health. E. RICHARD BROWN, Ph.D., is founder and director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, and he is professor of public health in the UCLA School of Public Health. He is also president of the American Public Health Association. Dr. Brown received his Ph.D. in sociology of education from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Brown has written extensively about a broad range of

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--> health policies, programs, and institutions, with emphasis on issues that affect the access of low-income people to health care. His most recent research has focused on health insurance coverage and the effects of lack of coverage and other factors on access to health services. He served as a senior consultant to the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform, for which he worked full time for several months in early 1993. Dr. Brown has developed bills in the California legislature and in the U.S. Senate, where he has served as health policy advisor to two senators. He has presented invited testimony to numerous committees in both houses of the U.S. Congress and in the California legislature and has provided consultation to private, local, state, federal, and international agencies. WILLIAM T. BUTLER, M.D., is chancellor of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, having served previously as president from 1979 to 1996. He is a professor of internal medicine and of microbiology and immunology. Dr. Butler received his B.A. from Oberlin College and his M.D. from Western Reserve University in Cleveland. After residency training in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, he completed a research fellowship in bacteriology and immunology at Harvard Medical School. Before joining the Baylor faculty in 1966, Dr. Butler served as chief clinical associate in the Laboratory of Clinical Investigation at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). In 1991, he served as chairman of the Association of American Medical Colleges. He was elected to the IOM in 1990 and is also a member of many professional organizations, including the American Association of Immunologists, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He has authored more than 140 scientific publications in the fields of immunology and infectious diseases. VIRGINIA A. CAINE, M.D., is director of the Marion County Health Department in Indianapolis, Indiana. She is also associate professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Caine received her M.D. from the State University of New York, Upstate Medical School, in Syracuse. She completed her residency in internal medicine at the University of Cincinnati Medical School and a fellowship in infectious diseases at the University of Washington Medical School in Seattle. Between 1981 and 1984, Dr. Caine was assistant professor of medicine in the Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. During that time, she also served as associate medical director in the Clinic for Sexually Transmitted Diseases of the Baltimore City Health Department. Dr. Caine has served as a member and expert panelist on many national, state, and regional committees, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) expert panel on Sexually Transmitted Diseases Guidelines and the CDC's Healthy People 2000 Progress Review for Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Dr. Caine is a member of numerous professional societies, including the

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--> National Medical Association, where she is chair of the Infectious Disease and AIDS Sections. DAVID D. CELENTANO, Sc.D., M.H.S., is professor of social and behavioral sciences in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He is also professor of epidemiology and international health. Dr. Celentano is a behavioral scientist with extensive experience in leading investigations of social and behavioral epidemiology in the fields of HIV/AIDS, STDs, substance abuse, and cancer. He has been active in HIV/AIDS research since 1984, when he assisted in the development of the assessment strategy for the Multi-Center AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) of the natural history of HIV infection in gay and bisexual men. He is an active contributor in the ALIVE study, the largest longitudinal study of HIV infection in injection drug users. Since 1990, he has been conducting investigations on HIV infection in Thailand. Dr. Celentano received his B.A. in psychology, his M.H.S. in mental hygiene, and his Sc.D. in behavioral sciences from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Celentano is a member of the International AIDS Society, the American Sexually Transmitted Disease Association, and the Society for Epidemiological Research. PAUL D. CLEARY, Ph.D., is a professor in the Departments of Health Care Policy and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He also holds appointments as lecturer and associate professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health and as visiting associate professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Columbia University School of Public Health. Dr. Cleary received both his B.S. in physics and his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Cleary is editor of The Milbank Quarterly and a consulting editor of the Journal of Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry. His research interests focus on health behavior, screening and risk assessment, assessment of health outcomes, and health policy. Between 1989 and 1992, Dr. Cleary was a member of the local advisory committee for the Eighth International Conference on AIDS. He is currently a member of the Data Monitoring Board for the Department of Veterans Affairs and a member of the Committee on Higher Degrees in Health Policy. Dr. Cleary is a member of many professional societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Association of Health Services Research, and he was elected to the IOM in 1994. MARGARET A. HAMBURG, M.D., is commissioner of health for New York City. She received her M.D. from Harvard Medical School and completed her residency in internal medicine at the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Dr. Hamburg began her service in the NYC Department of Health in June 1990 as deputy commissioner for Family Health Services. In that position she was responsible

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--> for child health, school and adolescent health, day care, dental health services, lead poisoning control, families with special needs, maternity services and family planning, and substance abuse. Between 1986 and 1988, she worked for the federal assistant secretary for health in the areas of disease prevention and health promotion. From 1988 to 1990, Dr. Hamburg was a senior member of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), first as special assistant to the director and then as assistant director of the Institute. While at NIAID, she was instrumental in shaping AIDS research strategies and policies. Dr. Hamburg has extensive research experience in the areas of biology of addictions, behavioral sciences, and child development. She serves on many health-related committees and organizations and is the author of numerous scientific articles. Dr. Hamburg was elected to the IOM in 1994. KING K. HOLMES, M.D., Ph.D., is director of the Center for AIDS and STD, professor of medicine, and adjunct professor of microbiology and epidemiology at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Holmes received his A.B. from Harvard, his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College, and his Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Hawaii. He completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of Washington. Dr. Holmes has written and conducted extensive research in the areas of STDs, AIDS, etiology and natural history of cervical neoplasia, and surveillance of gonorrhea. He is a member of the editorial boards of many scientific journals, including Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Genitourinary Medicine. Dr. Holmes is a member of numerous national and international committees, including the NIH Office of AIDS Research, the WHO Expert Advisory Panel on Venereal Infections, and the Board of Scientific Counselors at the CDC Center for Infectious Diseases. Dr. Holmes has received numerous honors and awards, including the City of Medicine Award and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Infectious Diseases Research Award. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Microbiology and was elected to the IOM in 1987. EDWARD W. HOOK III, M.D., is professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Schools of Medicine and Public Health and is a senior scientist at the UAB AIDS Center. He also serves as the medical director of the STD Control Program of the Jefferson County Health Department in Birmingham. Dr. Hook received his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College and completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Washington Affiliated Hospitals in Seattle. Between 1985 and 1992, Dr. Hook was a member of the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and School of Hygiene and Public Health. During that time, he also served as chief of the Sexually Transmitted Diseases Clinical Services at the Baltimore City Health Department. Dr. Hook is past president of the American Venereal Disease Association, serves on the editorial board of the journal

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--> Clinical Updates in Infectious Diseases, and is a member of the advisory board of the Alabama State Department of Public Health. He has published extensively in the field of STDs on such topics as the diagnosis and treatment of gonorrhea and syphilis and the interrelationship between HIV and STDs. LORETTA SWEET JEMMOTT, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., is associate professor of nursing and the director of the Office of HIV Prevention Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She is also an associate at the Center for Population Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and an associate at the HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies of Columbia University. Dr. Jemmott received her B.S.N. from Hampton Institute. She received her M.S.N. in child, adolescent, and family psychiatric mental health nursing and her Ph.D. in education, specializing in human sexuality education, from the University of Pennsylvania. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Jemmott has been involved in a line of research designed to elucidate the psychosocial factors that underlie HIV risk behaviors among African American adolescents and women. She has designed and tested theory-based, culturally appropriate interventions to reduce those risks. Dr. Jemmott has published extensively in the areas of HIV/AIDS prevention, adolescent sexual behavior, and condom use among African American adolescents. She has received many honors, including the Congressional Merit Recognition Award, the Outstanding Research Award from the Northern New Jersey Black Nurses Association, and the Governor of New Jersey's Nurse Merit Award in Advanced Nursing Practice. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and a member of the National Institute of Nursing Research's Advisory Council. DOROTHY MANN is executive director of the Family Planning Council for Southeastern Pennsylvania, Inc., where she has served in this position since 1977. The Council provides family planning services to low-income women and sponsors programs in cancer and genetic screening, maternity services, and STD/HIV research and training. Ms. Mann received her B.A. in anthropology and history from Bennington College, and completed all the requirements for her M.A. in anthropology at Columbia University. She has conducted extensive research in the areas of family planning, sexuality education, and abortion and contraceptive services for teenagers. Ms. Mann is a member of numerous professional and national organizations, including the National Family Planning Association, the Philadelphia AIDS Coalition, and the AIDS Advocacy Coalition. PATRICK H. MATTINGLY, M.D., is senior vice president of planning and development at Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Brookline, Massachusetts, and previously served as president and medical director of the Harvard Community Health Plan of New England in Providence, Rhode Island. Dr. Mattingly received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. He trained in internal medicine at Harvard and completed a residency in pediatrics at the University of Washington

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--> in Seattle. Between 1981 and 1990, Dr. Mattingly served as president and chief executive officer of the Wyman Park Health System, an integrated health care system, which he merged into the Johns Hopkins Health System. During 1989 and 1990, Dr. Mattingly served as an IOM scholar in residence with the Council on Health Care Technology. He is a member of many professional organizations, including the Group Health Association of America, the American College of Physician Executives, and the Rhode Island Anti-Drug Coalition. Dr. Mattingly is a member of the Rhode Island Health Services Council and is president of The HMO Group Insurance Company Ltd. KATHLEEN E. TOOMEY, M.D., M.P.H., is state epidemiologist and director of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch of the Division of Public Health in Georgia. She is an adjunct professor in the Divisions of Epidemiology and International Health at Emory School of Public Health in Atlanta. She received her A.B. in biology from Smith College and her M.D. and M.P.H. from Harvard University. After completing her residency in family medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle in 1982, she served for three years as the clinical director of the Kotzebue Service Unit with the Indian Health Service in Alaska. In 1985, Dr. Toomey was selected as a Pew Health Policy Research Fellow at the University of California, San Francisco, Institute for Health Policy Studies. From 1987 to 1993, she held a number of positions within the Division of STD/HIV Prevention at the CDC, including Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer and associate director. In 1991, Dr. Toomey served on the health staff of U.S. Senator John Chafee, drafting health care legislation. She has received many honors and awards, including the CDC Award for Contributions to the Advancement of Women and the Public Health Service Plaque for Outstanding Leadership. Her research interests include health services research, women's health and reproductive health policy, and the epidemiology and prevention of STDs and HIV/AIDS. She is a member of many professional and national organizations, including the Board of Directors of the Alan Guttmacher Institute and the APHA Program Development Board. A. EUGENE WASHINGTON, M.D., M.P.H., M.Sc., is professor and chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco. He is also director of the Medical Effectiveness Research Center for Diverse Populations at UCSF. Dr. Washington received his B.S. from Howard University, his M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco, his M.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley, and his M.Sc. from Harvard University. He completed residencies in preventive medicine at Harvard University and in gynecology and obstetrics at Stanford University. Dr. Washington has published extensively on topics in his major areas of research, which include effectiveness of health services, prevention of diseases in women, STD prevention and management policy, and patient preference in health

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--> care decision-making. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of Family Planning Perspectives and Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology . Dr. Washington has served as a member of many national and international committees, including the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the Board of the International Society for STD Research. He is currently a member of the Advisory Committee for the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Program, DHHS, and a member of the National Advisory Committee for the Arthur Ashe Fellowships in AIDS Care, Harvard AIDS Institute. CATHERINE M. WILFERT, M.D., is professor of pediatrics and microbiology at Duke University. Dr. Wilfert graduated from Harvard Medical School and completed an internship and residency in pediatrics at Boston City Hospital and the Children's Hospital Medical Center in Boston. After a fellowship in pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Children's Hospital Medical Center, she joined the faculty at Duke University. Dr. Wilfert's clinical investigations have included vaccine trials in children and, more recently, therapeutic trials for pediatric HIV infection. She is the principal investigator of the pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Unit (ACTU) at Duke, which has been operating since 1987. Her other responsibilities have included serving as chair of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for the CDC, a member of the Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Advisory Committee to NIAID, and a member of the Advisory Committee to the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research at FDA. Dr. Wilfert was the first chair of the Pediatric Committee of the pediatric ACTU, and she continues to be involved in the national organization of multi-center trials. JONATHAN M. ZENILMAN, M.D., is associate professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He also holds joint appointments in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Zenilman received his B.A. in chemistry from Cornell University and his M.D. from the State University of New York at the Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn. He completed a residency in internal medicine and was a fellow of infectious diseases at the Kings County Hospital Center in Brooklyn. Between 1985 and 1989, Dr. Zenilman served as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer and as clinical research investigator at the CDC. At that time, he coordinated the publication of the 1989 Sexually Transmitted Disease Treatment Guidelines and developed the National Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project. Dr. Zenilman is on the editorial board of the journals Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Genitourinary Medicine, serves as a consultant to the journal AMA Drug Evaluations, and as a reviewer for The Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Zenilman has received many honors and awards, including the American Foundation for AIDS Research (AmFAR) Scholar Award and a U.S. Public Health Service Unit Citation.

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--> He is a member of many professional organizations, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Infectious Disease Society of America. Dr. Zenilman served on the Committee on Prevention and Control of STDs from January 1995 through September 1995. IOM Staff THOMAS R. ENG, V.M.D., M.P.H., is a senior program officer at the IOM for the Committee on Prevention and Control of STDs. He was most recently an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Congressional Fellow in the U.S. Senate, where he served as a health policy advisor to Senator Paul Simon on issues including health care financing and reform, public health, maternal and child health, and food and drug regulation. During his fellowship, Dr. Eng developed and wrote legislation to provide universal health care coverage for children and pregnant women. He was recently on detail from the CDC to the Peace Corps, where he served as the latter agency's epidemiologist and worked in numerous developing countries. In addition, he has worked in two state health departments and was a preventive medicine resident and Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer with the CDC. Dr. Eng received his degree in veterinary medicine from the University of Pennsylvania and in public health from Harvard University. He has received several awards from the U.S. Public Health Service and the International Society for Travel Medicine, and he is a member of various professional organizations, including the American Public Health Association. LESLIE M. HARDY, M.H.S., is currently a senior policy analyst in the office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE). Prior to her position at ASPE she was senior program officer at the IOM, where she was study director for the Committee on Prevention and Control of STDs. She has been with the IOM since 1986 and most recently directed the IOM's Roundtable for the Development of Drugs and Vaccines Against AIDS, a group composed of leaders from government, the pharmaceutical industry, academia, and patient advocacy groups. The Roundtable convened workshops and conferences to identify and help resolve impediments to the rapid availability of safe, effective drugs and vaccines for HIV infection and AIDS. During her tenure with the Roundtable, Ms. Hardy wrote and edited several workshop reports on topics including the development of effective therapies for AIDS-related infections, gene therapy for HIV infection, government and industry collaboration in HIV/AIDS drug development, and enhancing heterogeneity in HIV/AIDS clinical studies. Prior to the Roundtable, Ms. Hardy served as study director for the IOM committee that produced the 1991 report HIV Screening of Pregnant Women and Newborns. She also formerly served as staff officer for the IOM/NAS AIDS Activities Oversight Committee, which produced the study report Confronting AIDS: Update 1988.

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--> During her work with the AIDS Oversight Committee, she focused on issues pertaining to the delivery and financing of health care for people with HIV infection, stress among HIV/AIDS care providers, and the care of neuropsychologically impaired people with AIDS. Ms. Hardy received her bachelor of arts degree in zoology and botany from Duke University and her master of health science degree in maternal and child health from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Ms. Hardy served as the senior program officer on this project through July 1995. JENNIFER K. HOLLIDAY is a project assistant at the IOM for the Committee on Prevention and Control of STDs. Ms. Holliday has been with the IOM for four years. She previously worked as a project assistant with the Roundtable for the Development of Drugs and Vaccines Against AIDS. Prior to joining the IOM, Ms. Holliday worked as registrar for the Art in Embassies Program at the U.S. Department of State, where she managed the return of art collections from American embassies to lending institutions, private collectors, and individuals. Ms. Holliday received her B.A. in Southwest Studies from Colorado College. MARISSA WEINBERGER FULLER, M.H.S., is a research associate at the IOM for the Committee on Prevention and Control of STDs. Prior to joining the IOM, she was a policy analyst at the National Governors' Association (NGA) in the Health Policy Studies Division. Her primary area of research involved maternal and child health. She published several issues of the MCH Update, a publication highlighting state initiatives to improve maternal and child health. She also authored the report Improving Coordination Between Medicaid and Title II of the Ryan White CARE Act, prepared for the Health Care Financing Administration. Prior to joining NGA, Ms. Fuller was the outreach coordinator at a community health center in New York City. She received her A.B. in political science from Barnard College and her M.H.S. degree in health policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. MICHAEL A. STOTO, Ph.D., is director of the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the IOM. He received an A.B. in statistics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in statistics and demography from Harvard University and was formerly an associate professor of public policy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. A member of the professional staff since 1987, Dr. Stoto directed the IOM's effort in support of the Public Health Service's Healthy People 2000 project and has worked on IOM projects addressing a number of issues in public health, health statistics, health promotion and disease prevention, vaccine safety and policy, and AIDS. Most recently, Dr. Stoto served as study director for the IOM committee that produced Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam . Dr. Stoto is coauthor of Data for Decision: Information Strategies for Policy Makers and numerous

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--> articles in statistics, demography, health policy, and other fields. He is a member of the American Public Health Association, the American Statistical Association, the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, the Population Association for America, and other organizations.

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