Appendix B
Biographical Sketches

PATRICIA A. KING (Chair) is the Carmack Waterhouse professor of law, medicine, ethics, and public policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. She is a senior research fellow with the Kennedy Institute of Ethics. She has served on several committees of the National Research Council (NRC) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM), including the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (1992-1995), the IOM Committee to Study the Social and Ethical Impact of Biomedicine (1992-1994), the IOM Committee on Assessing Genetic Risks (1991-1993), and the IOM Board on Health and Science Policy (1989-1994). King has served as deputy assistant attorney general, Civil Division, of the U.S. Department of Justice; on the faculty of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; and as deputy director of the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. She has a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a B.A. from Wheaton College.

JACQUELYN C. CAMPBELL is the Anna D. Wolf endowed professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. She was formerly a member of the faculty of Wayne State University and served as a support group facilitator and counselor at several shelters for battered women in Detroit and in New York. Campbell has also been a child and adolescent therapist, a LaMaze instructor, a pediatric nurse, and a high school nurse. She has received awards from the University of Rochester School of Nursing, the Midwest Nursing Research Society, the Michigan Association of Governing Boards of State Universities, the Kellogg National Leadership Fellowship, Wayne State University, the American Academy of Nursing, and Duke University. Campbell was one of six nurse



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--> Appendix B Biographical Sketches PATRICIA A. KING (Chair) is the Carmack Waterhouse professor of law, medicine, ethics, and public policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. She is a senior research fellow with the Kennedy Institute of Ethics. She has served on several committees of the National Research Council (NRC) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM), including the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (1992-1995), the IOM Committee to Study the Social and Ethical Impact of Biomedicine (1992-1994), the IOM Committee on Assessing Genetic Risks (1991-1993), and the IOM Board on Health and Science Policy (1989-1994). King has served as deputy assistant attorney general, Civil Division, of the U.S. Department of Justice; on the faculty of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; and as deputy director of the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. She has a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a B.A. from Wheaton College. JACQUELYN C. CAMPBELL is the Anna D. Wolf endowed professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. She was formerly a member of the faculty of Wayne State University and served as a support group facilitator and counselor at several shelters for battered women in Detroit and in New York. Campbell has also been a child and adolescent therapist, a LaMaze instructor, a pediatric nurse, and a high school nurse. She has received awards from the University of Rochester School of Nursing, the Midwest Nursing Research Society, the Michigan Association of Governing Boards of State Universities, the Kellogg National Leadership Fellowship, Wayne State University, the American Academy of Nursing, and Duke University. Campbell was one of six nurse

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--> researchers in the country featured in the Sigma Theta Tau International Nurse Researchers ''CAMEO" video series. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Rochester School of Nursing and a B.S.N. from the Duke University School of Nursing. ROSEMARY CHALK (Study Director) is the deputy director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. She is directing other studies and project initiatives focused on youth development and child welfare. She has previously directed studies on child abuse, research ethics, and science and human rights for the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. Chalk was the staff director of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science during its formative years. She has edited an anthology of articles on social responsibility and academic freedom in science, titled Science, Technology, and Society: Emerging Relationships. She has a B.A. from the University of Cincinnati. DAVID S. CORDRAY is the chair of the Department of Human Resources and professor of public policy and psychology at Vanderbilt University Peabody College. He has previously been a member of the faculty of Northwestern University and also worked in the U.S. Government Accounting Office in Washington, D.C. He has served as president of the American Evaluation Association and also on the National Academy of Public Administration's Panel on the Status of Evaluation in the Federal Government. Cordray has a B.A. and an M.A. from California State University, Northridge, and a Ph.D. from the Claremont Graduate School at Northwestern University. NANCY CROWELL (Staff Officer) is a staff officer in the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education in the National Research Council. She has organized a number of workshops for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, and previously she staffed National Research Council studies on violence against women and risk communication and policy implications of greenhouse warming. Trained as a pediatric audiologist, Crowell worked in a demonstration project for preschool hearing-impaired children and their families at Ball State University. She also worked on several political campaigns and for a political polling and consulting firm prior to joining the National Research Council staff. She has a B.S. from St. Lawrence University and an M.A. from Vanderbilt University. KATHERINE DARKE (Research Assistant) is a research assistant in the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Research Council. She has an M.P.P. and a B.A. in government from the College of William and Mary.

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--> DIANA J. ENGLISH is the research director of the Children's Services Research Unit in the Children's Administration of the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. She has served on the faculty of the University of Washington and Western Washington University. She has worked as a casework supervisor and caseworker, counselor, and social worker in the United States and in England. Her research fields include child abuse and neglect, risk assessment, and decision making in child protective services. English has B.A. and M.S.W. degrees from Sacramento State University and a Ph.D. in social welfare from the University of Washington. JEFFREY A. FAGAN is director of the Center for Violence Research and Prevention and visiting professor at the Division of Sociomedical Sciences in the School of Public Health at Columbia University. He has previously served as a member of the faculty of the Rutgers University School of Criminal Justice and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York. Fagan has worked at the New York City Criminal Justice Agency and directed the Center for Law and Public Policy at the URSA Institute in San Francisco. His research interests have focused on the relationship between race, ethnicity, and poverty. He has a Ph.D. and an M.S. from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a B.E. from New York University. RICHARD J. GELLES is the director of the Family Violence Research Program and professor of sociology and psychology at the University of Rhode Island. He is the author of 19 books, including The Violent Home (1974), which was the first systematic empirical investigation of family violence and, most recently, The Book of David (1996), which advocates for reform of the child welfare system. In 1996 Gelles served as the American Sociological Association's congressional fellow in the office of the Senate Subcommittee on Youth Violence. Gelles has a Ph.D. from the University of New Hampshire, an M.A. from the University of Rochester, and an A.B. from Bates College. JOEL B. GREENHOUSE is professor of statistics at Carnegie Mellon University and adjunct professor of epidemiology and psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. He is a member of the National Research Council's Committee on National Statistics and was a member of the NRC Panel on Statistical Issues for Research in the Combination of Information for the Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. Greenhouse is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an elected member of the International Statistics Institute. He has a B.S. from the University of Maryland and Ph.D., M.P.H., and M.A. degrees from the University of Michigan.

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--> SCOTT HARSHBARGER was elected attorney general of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in November 1990 and took office in January 1991. He was reelected in 1994. He has focused public attention on issues related to urban violence, health care reform, and family violence. Prior to his election as attorney general, Harshbarger served for eight years as district attorney of Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He also served as the first general counsel to the Massachusetts State Ethics Commission, and in the Attorney General's Office as chief of the Public Protection Bureau. He was also deputy chief counsel for the Massachusetts Defenders Committee. Between periods of public service, Harshbarger worked as a trial attorney in Boston. Harshbarger has a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a B.A. from Harvard University. DARNELL F. HAWKINS is a professor in the Departments of African-American Studies and Sociology and a faculty affiliate of the Criminal Justice Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has previously served on the faculty of the University of North Carolina, and has taught grades three and four in the Detroit public schools. His publications have featured research on homicide among young African Americans and press coverage of homicide. Hawkins has a J.D. from the University of North Carolina, a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, an M.A.T. from Wayne State University, and a B.A. from Kansas State University. CINDY LEDERMAN is a circuit court judge in the 11th Judicial Circuit in and for Dade County, Florida, assigned to the Juvenile Division. Elected to the county court in 1990, she was a leader of the team that created Dade County's Domestic Violence Court and served as its first administrative judge until her elevation to Circuit Court in 1994. Lederman is a faculty member of the National Judicial College and is the coordinator of the National Judicial College's domestic violence course. In 1995, she was appointed by the U.S. attorney general and the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to the National Advisory Council on Violence Against Women. She is the immediate past president of the National Association of Women Judges. On April 15, 1997, Florida governor Lawton Chiles awarded Lederman the Governor's Peace at Home Award in recognition of her work in the field of domestic violence. ELIZABETH McLOUGHLIN is the director of prevention for the San Francisco Injury Center for Research and Prevention at the University of California, San Francisco, and director of programs for the Trauma Foundation at San Francisco General Hospital. She has a faculty appointment with the Department of Surgery of the University of California at San Francisco and the School of Hygiene and Public Health of the Johns Hopkins University. She has conducted injury research for the University of Otago School of Medicine in Dunedin and

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--> Wellington, New Zealand. Prior to her work in public health, she taught English in two high schools in New York. McLoughlin has an Sc.D. from the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, an M.A. from the Teachers College at Columbia University, and M.A. and B.A. degrees from Manhattanville College. ELI NEWBERGER is a pediatrician at Children's Hospital in Boston. In 1970 he organized the hospital's first child protection team and has directed the Interdisciplinary Research Training Program on Family Violence at Boston Children's Hospital since 1979, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. After two years in the Peace Corps in West Africa, he returned to Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School to complete his residency in pediatrics. Newberger has served on many national boards and committees, including the U.S. Advisory Board to the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Council on Accreditation of Services for Children and Families, and the American Orthopsychiatric Association, the latter as president in 1991. He has earned degrees from Yale University (where he was a Scholar of the House in music theory), an M.D. from Yale Medical School, and an M.S. in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. JOY D. OSOFSKY is professor of pediatrics and psychology at Louisiana State University Medical Center and adjunct professor of psychology at University of New Orleans. Previously, she was a member of the faculty at Cornell University and Temple University. For the past 25 years she has been involved with preventive intervention research with adolescent mothers and their infants, and, more recently, with children and families exposed to violence. In addition to work in the United States, Osofsky has consulted extensively regarding infant mental health issues in Europe, Asia, and South America. She has edited Children in a Violent Society (1997), the Handbook on Infant Development (1979, 1987), and co-edited Hurt, Healing and Hope: Caring for Infants and Toddlers in Violent Environments. She is past president of the World Association for Infant Mental Health, a member of the board of directors of Zero-to-Three/National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, and editor of the Infant Mental Health Journal . She has B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Syracuse University. HELEN RODRIGUEZ-TRIAS is a pediatrician and consultant on community-based health programs. She is codirector of the Pacific Institute for Women's Health, based in Los Angeles, an organization for applied research, advocacy, and program development to advance women's health. Rodriguez-Trias has directed pediatric programs in Puerto Rico, New York City, and Newark. She has held the rank of associate professor of clinical pediatrics, teaching medical students at the University of Puerto Rico, Albert Einstein College of Medicine,

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--> the Sophie Davis Center for Biomedical Sciences at City College of New York, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Her emphasis in teaching, research, and activism is on improving the social and economic circumstances that affect children's and women's health. She served on the IOM Committee on Unintended Pregnancy and is a past president of the American Public Health Association. SUSAN SCHECHTER is clinical professor at the University of Iowa School of Social Work. She has served on the adjunct faculty of the School of Health Sciences at Hunter College, as director at the Women's Education Institute in New York, as the program coordinator of the AWAKE program at Children's Hospital in Boston, and as coordinator of the Park Slope Safe Homes Project at Children and Youth Development Services in Brooklyn, New York. Schechter has been a social worker, a psychotherapist, and director of a day care training program. She coauthored When Love Goes Wrong and is the author of Women and Male Violence: The Visions and Struggles of the Battered Women's Movement . She has an M.S.W. from the University of Illinois and a B.A. from Washington University. JACK P. SHONKOFF (liaison member) is dean of the Florence Heller Graduate School and Samuel F. and Rose B. Gingold Professor of Human Development at Brandeis University. Shonkoff is chair of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. Over the past 15 years, he has served on numerous committees of the NRC and IOM, including the Panel on Child Care Policy, the Steering Group for the National Forum on the Future of Children and Families, and the Roundtable on Head Start Research. Shonkoff is the principal investigator of the Early Intervention Collaborative Study, a longitudinal investigation of the development of biologically vulnerable infants and their families. He is a member of the board of directors of Zero-to-Three and a member of the governing council of the Society for Research in Child Development. Shonkoff also serves on the core group of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Research Network on Successful Pathways Through Middle Childhood. He has degrees from Cornell University and the New York University School of Medicine. He has received pediatric training at the Bronx Municipal Hospital Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed a fellowship in developmental pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and The Children's Hospital in Boston. He has received multiple professional awards, including a Kellogg national fellowship, a fellowship from the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, and the 1995 distinguished contribution to child advocacy award from the American Psychological Association. MICHAEL E. SMITH is professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School. He was previously the president of the Vera Institute of Justice, where he had

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--> worked since 1977; formerly, he held the positions of director and deputy director in the Institute's New York and London offices. Smith is also a visiting lecturer at Yale Law School. He has worked at the Legal Action Center of the City of New York, for New York Senator Charles Goodell, and as overseas correspondent for Time, Life, and Sports Illustrated. Smith has a J.D. from Harvard Law School, a B.A. from Oxford University, which he attended as a Rhodes scholar, and a B.A. from Princeton University. BILL WALSH is a 17-year veteran of the Dallas Police Department, currently assigned to the Youth and Family Crimes Division as commander of the Investigations Section. He has responsibility over the Child Abuse Unit, which is responsible for the investigation of all cases of intrafamilial physical and sexual child abuse, including fatal child abuse; the Child Exploitation Unit, which investigates cases involving sexual abuse and exploitation of children by nonfamily members; and the Family Violence Unit, which is responsible for investigating assaultive conduct between family members. Walsh started the Child Exploitation Unit in 1988 and also initiated the Crimes Against Children seminar for law enforcers that is held annually in Dallas. In 1992 he created the Dallas County Child Review Death Team, the first child fatality review team to operate independently of Child Protective Services. He is cofounder and a trustee of the Dallas Children's Advocacy Center, a nonprofit public/private partnership through which the Dallas Police Department and Dallas County Child Protective Services conduct joint investigations into allegations of child abuse and neglect. CAROLE L. WARSHAW is the director of behavioral science at Cook County Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, codirector of the Hospital Crisis Intervention project, and adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. She was chair of the American Medical Association's Committee to Develop Guidelines on Domestic Violence, and is a consultant to the Family Violence Prevention Fund. Warshaw is a member of Chicago Mayor Daley's Task Force on Women's Health and adviser to the Chicago Commission of Violence Against Women. She has an M.D. from Loyola University and a B.A. from Mount Holyoke College. CATHY SPATZ WIDOM (liaison member) is professor of criminal justice and psychology at the State University of New York at Albany. She is a former faculty member in psychology and social relations at Harvard University and in criminal justice and psychology at Indiana University. She received the 1989 American Association for the Advancement of Science Behavioral Research Prize and was elected a fellow of the American Psychological Association in 1993. She has published extensively on topics that include child abuse and neglect, juvenile delinquency, female criminality, and violence. Her current research interests focus on the intergenerational transmission of violence and the long-term

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--> consequences of early childhood abuse and neglect. She has a Ph.D. from Brandeis University. ROSALIE S. WOLF is executive director of the Institute on Aging at the Memorial Hospital in Worcester, Massachusetts, and assistant professor in the Department of Medicine and Community Medicine and Family Practice at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Wolf has focused on the study of elder abuse in domestic settings over the last decade. She has directed elder abuse projects and completed evaluations of seven state projects on the subject. Wolf is the president of the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and serves on the management team of the National Center on Elder Abuse in Washington, D.C. In addition, she is coeditor of the Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect. Wolf has a Ph.D. from the Florence Heller Graduate School at Brandeis University and a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin.