Biographical Sketches

ERIC A. HANUSHEK (Chair) is professor of economics and public policy and director of the W. Allen Wallis Institute of Political Economy at the University of Rochester. Formerly, he was deputy director of the Congressional Budget Office, and he has held academic appointments at Yale University and the U.S. Air Force Academy. His research involves applied public finance and public policy analysis, with special reference to schooling and aspects of income determination. He is a past president of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, and he has had governmental appointments at the Cost of Living Council and the Council of Economic Advisers. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

GARY BURTLESS is a senior fellow in the economic studies program at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. Previously, he served as an economist in the Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor and at the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. His research focuses on issues connected with public finance, aging, saving, labor markets, income distribution, social insurance, and the behavioral effects of government tax and transfer policy. He is the author of numerous articles on the effects of Social Security, welfare, unemployment insurance, and taxes. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

ALAN L. GUSTMAN is Loren M. Berry professor of economics at Dartmouth College and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Formerly, he was a Special Assistant for Economic Affairs at the U.S. Depart



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Assessing Knowledge of Retirement Behavior Biographical Sketches ERIC A. HANUSHEK (Chair) is professor of economics and public policy and director of the W. Allen Wallis Institute of Political Economy at the University of Rochester. Formerly, he was deputy director of the Congressional Budget Office, and he has held academic appointments at Yale University and the U.S. Air Force Academy. His research involves applied public finance and public policy analysis, with special reference to schooling and aspects of income determination. He is a past president of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, and he has had governmental appointments at the Cost of Living Council and the Council of Economic Advisers. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. GARY BURTLESS is a senior fellow in the economic studies program at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. Previously, he served as an economist in the Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor and at the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. His research focuses on issues connected with public finance, aging, saving, labor markets, income distribution, social insurance, and the behavioral effects of government tax and transfer policy. He is the author of numerous articles on the effects of Social Security, welfare, unemployment insurance, and taxes. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ALAN L. GUSTMAN is Loren M. Berry professor of economics at Dartmouth College and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Formerly, he was a Special Assistant for Economic Affairs at the U.S. Depart

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Assessing Knowledge of Retirement Behavior ment of Labor. His research has involved labor and public economics, with strong emphasis on the economics of retirement, pensions, and Social Security. He serves on the Steering Committee of the Health and Retirement Survey and on the Technical Advisory Panel of the National Longitudinal Survey. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Michigan. F. THOMAS JUSTER is a research scientist at the Survey Research Center and professor of economics at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His research includes the design of economic and social accounting systems, the analysis of saving and wealth accumulation patterns among U.S. households, the analysis of time allocation among households, and the development of measures of economic well-being. He has served on a number of National Research Council committees and chaired the Committee on the Supply and Demand for Mathematics and Science Teachers. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and chaired its Committee on the Quality of Economic Data. He is also a fellow of the National Association of Business Economists. He received a B.S. degree in education from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Columbia University. RONALD D. LEE is professor of demography and economics and chair of the Department of Demography at the University of California, Berkeley. He also currently serves as the director of the Center for the Demography and Economics of Aging and as a member of the neuroscience, behavior, and sociology of aging subcommittee of the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. His research focuses on demography and population studies, particularly from an economic point of view. A member of the National Academy of Sciences and chair of the Committee on Population, he has worked on many panels, currently serving on the Panel on Demographic and Economic Impacts of Immigration. He is a past president of the Population Association of America. He received a master's degree in demography from the University of California at Berkeley and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Harvard University. ROBIN L. LUMSDAINE is an assistant professor of economics at Princeton University and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research is in the areas of time-series econometrics and the economics of aging. In 1996–1997 she will be a national fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Previously, she was a visiting scholar at Northwestern University, the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, and the International Monetary Fund. She is an associate editor for The Journal of Business and Economic Statistics. She received a Ph.D. degree in economics from Harvard University.

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Assessing Knowledge of Retirement Behavior NANCY L. MARITATO is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics and the Committee on Population. Previously, she worked as an economist in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, and with the President's Council of Economic Advisers. Her interests focus on poverty and welfare policy analysis. She received B.A. and M.A. degrees in economics from the University of Wisconsin, where she is currently working on a Ph.D. degree in economics. DONALD O. PARSONS is professor emeritus of economics at Ohio State University. He has held the Siena Chair in economics at the University of Siena (Italy), where he received a Fulbright Scholar Distinquished Lecturing Award. He has also been the Harry Scherman Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a visiting scholar at the Centre for Socio-legal Studies, Wolfson College, Oxford University. His recent research has focused on labor market contracts, including pension and retirement issues, and the design of social insurance programs, with special reference to disability insurance. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Chicago. JAMES M. POTERBA is the Mitsui professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught since 1982. He is also director of the Public Economics Research Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research, coeditor of the Journal of Public Economics, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Econometric Society. His research focuses on the economic analysis of taxation, government expenditure programs, and financial markets; his recent work has emphasized the effect of taxation on the financial behavior of households and firms and the tax treatment of employee benefits. He recently completed a term as a director of the American Finance Association. He received a D.Phil. degree in economics from Oxford University. JONATHAN S. SKINNER is professor of economics at Dartmouth College and senior research associate at the Center for Evaluative Clinical Sciences, Dartmouth Medical School. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Prior to joining the Dartmouth faculty, he taught at the University of Virginia, the University of Washington, Stanford University, and Harvard University. His research interests are in tax policy, consumption and saving, and the economics of the Medicare program. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.