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APPENDIX A
Committee Member and Staff Biographical Information1

NATIONAL FORUM ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY GOALS—NO. 1: ENVIRONMENT

Co-Chairs

John F. Ahearne [NAE] is lecturer in public policy at Duke University and director of the Sigma Xi Center. Previously, he was executive director of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society. He was deputy assistant secretary of defense, 1972–1977; White House Energy Office and deputy assistant secretary of energy, 1977–1978; and commissioner of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1978–1983 (chairman, 1979–1981). From 1984 to 1989, he was vice president and sebior fellow, Resources for the Future, where he is currently adjunct scholar. He received a bachelor of engineering physics and an M.S. from Cornell University and both an M.A. and a Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University. Dr. Ahearne joined the Air Force in 1959 and resigned in 1970 with the rank of major. He then worked at the Air Force Weapons Center on nuclear weapons effects and taught at the Air Force Academy, Colorado College, and the University of Colorado (Colorado Springs).

H. Guyford Stever [NAS, NAE] is trustee at a variety of scientific agencies and a consultant on science issues. He was science and technology adviser to President Ford, 1976–1977. From 1972 to 1976, he was director of the National Science Foundation. He was president of Carnegie-Mellon University from 1965 to 1972, chief scientist of the Air Force from 1955 to 1965, and professor of aeronautical

1  

[NAS] Member of the National Academy of Sciences / [NAE] Member of the National Academy of Engineering / [IOM] Member of the Institute of Medicine.



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Linking Science and Technology to Society's Environmental Goals APPENDIX A Committee Member and Staff Biographical Information1 NATIONAL FORUM ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY GOALS—NO. 1: ENVIRONMENT Co-Chairs John F. Ahearne [NAE] is lecturer in public policy at Duke University and director of the Sigma Xi Center. Previously, he was executive director of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society. He was deputy assistant secretary of defense, 1972–1977; White House Energy Office and deputy assistant secretary of energy, 1977–1978; and commissioner of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1978–1983 (chairman, 1979–1981). From 1984 to 1989, he was vice president and sebior fellow, Resources for the Future, where he is currently adjunct scholar. He received a bachelor of engineering physics and an M.S. from Cornell University and both an M.A. and a Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University. Dr. Ahearne joined the Air Force in 1959 and resigned in 1970 with the rank of major. He then worked at the Air Force Weapons Center on nuclear weapons effects and taught at the Air Force Academy, Colorado College, and the University of Colorado (Colorado Springs). H. Guyford Stever [NAS, NAE] is trustee at a variety of scientific agencies and a consultant on science issues. He was science and technology adviser to President Ford, 1976–1977. From 1972 to 1976, he was director of the National Science Foundation. He was president of Carnegie-Mellon University from 1965 to 1972, chief scientist of the Air Force from 1955 to 1965, and professor of aeronautical 1   [NAS] Member of the National Academy of Sciences / [NAE] Member of the National Academy of Engineering / [IOM] Member of the Institute of Medicine.

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Linking Science and Technology to Society's Environmental Goals engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1946 to 1965. He received degrees from Colgate and California Institute of Technology. He was National Academy of Engineering foreign secretary from 1984 to 1988. In 1991, he was awarded the National Medal of Science. Membership Alvin L. Alm became assistant secretary for environmental management at the Department of Energy in May 1996. Before assuming that position, Mr. Alm was sector vice president and director responsible for the Environmental Business Area in the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). From 1985 to early 1987, Mr. Alm was chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Thermal Analytical Corporation. He stayed on the board until 1989. From 1987 to 1989, he was chief executive officer of Alliance Technologies Corporation and senior vice president of the parent company, TRC Companies, Inc. He became senior vice president and SAIC board member in June 1989. Mr. Alm received his B.A. in 1960 from the University of Denver and his MPA in 1961 from Syracuse University. Barbara l. Bentley is a professor of ecology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where she has been since 1973. While on the faculty, she was also dean of the Graduate School in 1983–1987. Her research interests include nitrogen fixation in tropical environments, plant and insect interactions, geographic variation in termite populations, and plant-herbivore interactions in Lupinus. She has been vice president for education for the Organization for Tropical Studies (1978–1985) and a member of the board of directors since 1974; vice president of the Ecological Society of America; director on the board of the Community Health Plan of Suffolk County, Long Island, New York; an appointee to the Environmental Conservation Board for the Village of Head of the Harbor, New York; a consultant to Brookhaven National Laboratory; a National Science Foundation visiting professor; a Fulbright fellow; and a member of the board of directors of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. Dr. Bentley received an M.A. from the University of California at Los Angeles and a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Kansas. Jan E. Beyea is a consultant and former senior scientist with the National Audubon Society in New York. Before his current position, he was on the research staff at Princeton University from 1976 to 1980, an assistant professor of physics at Holy Cross College from 1970 to 1976, and a research associate in physics at Columbia University from 1968 to 1970. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Health Physics Society. Dr. Beyea received a B.A. from Amherst College in 1962 and a Ph.D. in physics from Columbia University in 1968.

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Linking Science and Technology to Society's Environmental Goals Harvey Brooks [NAS, NAE, IOM] is Benjamin Pierce Professor of Technology and Public Policy, emeritus, in the Kennedy School of Government, and Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics, Emeritus, in the Division of Applied Science at Harvard University. Dr. Brooks graduated from Yale University and did graduate physics at Cambridge University, England, and at Harvard University (Ph.D., 1940). He joined General Electric in 1946, where he served as associate head of the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. He returned to Harvard in 1950 as Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics. From 1957 to 1975, he served as dean of the Division of Engineering and Applied Physics at Harvard. Dr. Brooks's research has been in solid-state physics, nuclear engineering, underwater acoustics, and more recently, science and public policy. He has served on many committees related to science policy. He was a member of the National Science Board from 1962 through 1974. He has received six honorary DSc degrees from Kenyon College, Union College, Yale University, Harvard University, Brown University, and Ohio State University. In 1994, he was recipient of the Philip Hauge Abelson Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Patricia A. Buffler [IOM] is the dean of the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, where she also holds a faculty appointment as professor of public health and epidemiology. Before becoming dean at Berkeley in December 1991, she was a member of the faculty at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center, School of Public Health, where she has held numerous positions since 1979. From 1980-1984, she served as associate dean for research at the school, while holding positions as professor of epidemiology and director of the Epidemiologic Research Unit. In 1988, she was named by the Health Sciences Center as director of the Southwest Center for Occupational and Environmental Health. In 1989, Dr. Buffler was named by the University of Texas as the first Ashbel Smith Professor of Public Health. She has served as president of the American College of Epidemiology. She has served as president of the American College of Epidemiology. She has served on many National Research Council committees. She holds on MPH and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. John B. Carberry has been with DuPont since 1965, in professional and management assignments in research, technical assistance, operating supervision, and business development at eight company locations from New Jersey to Texas. Most of his assignments have involved the development of chemical processes or of new products. He is serving on the chemical-engineering advisory board at Cornell, on a National Research Council Committee advising the Navy on technologies or dealing with shipboard wastes, and on the American Chemical Society Pollution Prevention Program Committee. He represents DuPont as the U.S. regional coordinating partner in the IMS Initiative for Cleaner Technologies. Mr. Carberry holds a BS (1963) and an M.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University, and an MBA (1974) from the University of Delaware.

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Linking Science and Technology to Society's Environmental Goals Emilio Q. Daddario [NAS, IOM] was a member of the U.S. Congress (1958–1972) and first director of Congress's Office of Technology Assessment (1973–1977). He was a professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1970–1971); mayor of Middletown, Connecticut (1946–1948); and a municipal-court judge (1948–1950). He received the Ralph Coats Roe Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1974, the honor award and medal from Stevens Institute of Technology in 1975, the Public Welfare award from the National Academy of Sciences in 1976, the Distinguished Service Award from the National Science Foundation in 1990, and the W.R. Grace Award from the American Chemical Society in 1992. Dr. Daddario holds a B.A. from Wesleyan University (1939), an LLB from the University of Connecticut (1942), a DSc from Wesleyan University (1967), and an LLD from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1967). Perry L. McCarty [NAE] Is Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil Engineering and director of the Western Region Hazardous Substance Center at Stanford University. He was also chairman of the Department of Civil Engineering from 1980 to 1985. Before then he was professor and associate professor of civil engineering (1962–1975). Before his career at Stanford, he was assistant professor of sanitary engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1958 to 1962. Dr. McCarty received a BS in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Rodney W. Nichols is president and chief executive officer of the New York Academy of Sciences. Before his current position, he was scholar-in-residence at the Carnegie Corporation from 1990 to 1992. He was vice president and executive vice president of the Rockefeller University from 1970 to 1990, having served as special assistant for research and technology in the office of the Secretary of Defense from 1966 to 1970. An applied physicist and systems analyst with industrial and international experience, he was written widely on science and technology policy and was a member of the Carnegie Commission's Executive Committee while serving on several of the commission's panels. Paul R. Portney is president of Resources for the future (RFF), an independent, nonpartisan research and educational organization concerning itself with natural resources and the environment. Immediately before becoming president of RFF, he held the position of vice president. Prior to that, he was director of its Center for Risk Management and its Quality of the Environment Division. From January 1979 to September 1980, he served as chief economist at the Council on Environmental Quality in the Executive Office of the President. From 1977 to 1979, he was a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley; in 1992, he was a visiting lecturer at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He received his BA

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Linking Science and Technology to Society's Environmental Goals in economics and mathematics from Alma College and his Ph.D. in economics from Northwestern University. He is the author or coauthor of a number of journal articles and books, the most recent of which is Footing the Bill for Superfund Cleanups: Who Pays and How? F. Sherwood Rowland [NAS, IOM] has been Donald Bren Professor of Chemistry since 1989 at the University of California, Irvine, where he has taught since 1964 and was department chairman in 1964–1970. He was awarded the Nobel Price for Chemistry in October 1995, which he shares with Paul Crutzen and Marrio Molina. Before going to Irvine, Dr. Rowland taught at the University of Kansas (1956–1963) and at Princeton University (1952–1956). He has more than 300 scientific publications in atmospheric chemistry, radiochemistry, and chemical kinetics. Dr. Rowland is co-discoverer, with Dr. Molina, of depletion of the ozone layer of the stratosphere by chlorofluorocarbon gases. Dr. Rowland has been president and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He holds an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and numerous honorary degrees. Robert M. White [NAE] is president emeritus of the National Academy of Engineering and senior fellow of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research at the American Meteorological Society. He holds a B.A. in geology from Harvard University and M.S. and ScD degrees in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served under five U.S. presidents from 1963 to 1977, first as chief of of the U.S. Weather Bureau and finally as the first administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In those capacities, he brought about a revolution in the U.S. weather warning system with satellite and computer technology, helping to initiate new approaches to the balanced management of the country's coastal zones. Staff Biographical Information Lawrence E. McCray is director of the National Research Council's Policy Division and executive director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. Dr. McCray held positions in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Regulatory Council, and the Office of Management and Budget before becoming to the academies in 1981. He has directed academy studies in carcinogenic risk assessment, export controls, nuclear winter, and federal science budgeting. A Fulbright scholar in 1968, he received the Schattschneider Award in 1972 from the American Political Science Association for the best dissertation in American government and politics. In 1987, he received the National Research Council Staff Award. Deborah D. Stine study director and associate director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). Dr. Stine has been working

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Linking Science and Technology to Society's Environmental Goals on various projects throughout the academy complex since 1989. She received a National Research Council group award for her first study for COSEPUP on policy implications of greenhouse warming and a Commission on Life Sciences staff citation for her work in risk assessment and management. Other studies have addressed graduate education, environmental remediation, the national biological survey, and corporate environmental stewardship. She holds a bachelor's degree in mechanical and environmental engineering from the University of California, Irvine; a master's degree in business administration; and a Ph.D. in public administration, specializing in policy analysis, from American University. Before coming to the academy, she was a mathematician for the Air Force, an air-pollution engineer for the State of Texas, and an air-issues manager for the Chemical Manufacturers Association. Patrick P. Sevcik is the program assistant for the National Forum on Science and Technology Goals. Before his work at the National Research Council, Mr. Sevcik was an assistant program officer with the International Republican Institute (IRI) from 1990 to 1993 working primarily in Central and Eastern Europe. He has held positions at the White House in the Office of Political Affairs (1989–1990) and on Capitol Hill (1987–1988) in the office of Representative John DioGuardi (R-NY). During this time, Mr. Sevcik also held concurrent positions in several Slovak-American organizations. He holds a B.A. in international affairs, with an emphasis on Soviet and Eastern European studies, from the George Washington University. He has also studied Russian language and culture at the Leningrad Polytechnic Institute in former Leningrad, USSR.