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JOHN H . 1913-1995 L U D WI G BY EARNEST F. GLOYNA JOHN H. LUDW]G, engineer, scientist, scholar, designer, envi- ronmental pathfinder, and orchestrater of national policy, died on February 17, 1995. He was buried at Arlington Nation- al Cemetery with full military honors. Electec! to the National Academy of Engineering in 1971 as an engineer/scientist, John was a uniquely qualified profes- sional. He initiated key solutions for many of the vexing problems associated with both traditional engineering design en cl rapidly changing environmental challenges. John received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley (1934), en cl the University of Colorado, BouIcler (1941), respectively, en c! his M.S. and doctor of science degrees in industrial health from Harvard School of Public Health (1956 to 1957~. He was hon- ored by membership in both Tan Beta Pi and Phi Beta Kappa. He obtained military training while an officer in the U.S. Army Air Corps, studying meteorology at New York University (1943 to 1944) and military government at the University of Virginia (February to April, 1945~. From 1935 to 1943, John's employment and first specialty assignments included the Metropolitan Water District, Los Angeles, California, construction engineer; the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, structural/hydraulics; and the U.S. Corps of En- gineers, hydraulic structures. ~43

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144 MEMORIAL TRIBUTES During World War Or, John served as a meteorologist in Greenianc3 and as a military government officer in Korea. The postwar era brought on a new level of professionalism. As chief of the project design section of the Corps of Engi neers, Sacramento L)istr~ct, Aorta, from 1946 to 1949, John supervised sixty engineers and ctraftsmen. He exercised major influence on both hydraulic and structural design of the Pine Flat Dam, Folsom Dam, and Isabella Dam. From 1949 to 1951 John became a partner in Ludwig Brothers Engineer- ing, Pasadena, California. This experience in applying engineering design to environmental solutions changed John's professional perspective and initiated his desire to ex- pand his knowleclge to the management of complex scientific, technical, social, en cl political problems associated with emerg- ing environmental programs. From 1951 to 1955, to further his interest in melding pro- fessional experience with the increasingly complex worIcl, he became a commissioned offic- er in the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and accepted an appointment as special assistant to the division chief of waste- supply/water-pollution control, USPHS, Washington, D.C. This assignment provicled an intimate and effective relation- ship with governmental institutions. The application of f~n~ineerin~ and scientific principles to forward planning be issues surrounding an ~ ~ , ~ 1 ~ 1 ~ ~r ~ ~ ~1 ^~ ~ ~ came a moclel, aria a new ~I-~ (31 ~llVll~lllll~llta1 Ally -1~` planning was initiated. Concurrently, as a Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) alternate to the Pres- iclent's Committee on Weather Modification, John gained a new perspective on assessing societal issues. From 1955 to 1968, concurrent with the establishment of the fecleral program in air pollution control and founts specialized education at Harvard, John provided leaclership for new pro- grams. He was directly responsible for development of the federal government's major air pollution research facility, spearheadecl the cooperative research en c! clevelopment government/inclus- try program, and catalyzed cooperative programs with major fecleral agencies. During this time, he was the director of the Federal Research and Development Program in Engineering and Physical Sciences in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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JOHN H. LUDWIG 145 From 1968 to 1972 as assistant commissioner for science and technology, National Air Pollution Control Administra- tion/HEW, John exercised oversight of science and technology activities for HEW, other governmental agencies, en c! the private sector. He spearheacled the National Air Pol- Jution Control Aclministration's program of (a) cooperative research and development with the private sector (hi e~n~nd ed research and clevelopment to bring the nation7s resources to bear on environmental air pollution problems; and (c) nu- merous international activities. He was a U.S. delegate to the Air Management Research Group of the Organization for Eco- nomic Cooperation and Development, chairman of the Working Group on Air Pollution for the Economic Commis- sion for Europe, a member of the WorIc! Health Organization's Expert Advisory Pane] on Air Pollution, a mem- ber of NATO's Committee on the Challenges of Moclern Society, and a responsible officer over a host of cooperative contracts with a multitude of countries. John retired July 1, 1972, after thirty-four years of federal ser- vice. However, as a private consultant, he continued to provide valuable services to his country, and in particular, he assisted in furthering the course of effective air pollution control. He was a registered engineer in California and Oregon and a diplomate (specialty license) of the American Association of Environmental Engineers (AAEE). He was an active member in the American Society of Civil Engineers, American Meteorological Society, Air Pollution Control Association, American Public Works Association, American Academy for the Advancement of Science, and sev- eral honorary societies. Service honors inclucled the Commendation Meclal, HEW (1963~; Superior Service Award, HEW (1967~; Gold Medal for Exceptional Service, Environ- mental Protection Agency ~1971 1; and the Gordon Fair Award, AAEE (19731. John's scholarly attention to detail, professionalism, and dedication to the welfare of mankind helped to expand the body of knowledge for the civil and environmental engineer- ing profession. His more than ninety publications attest his varied and comprehensive technical experience.

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146 MEMORIAL TRIBUTES He was a superb water resources engineer cluring his early career; he was directly responsible for the development of the federal government's major research facility in air pollution control; he initiated an advanced level of forward planning for the United States ant! other governmental entities; and he established long-ranging air pollution control policies. His love of family, a wife and two sons, was paramount and this was reciprocated in every respect. His sons have followed his interest in scientific and engineering fields. He will be remembered for his professionalism, leaclership, compassion, wit, modesty, and generosity.

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