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  • The needs of many high-risk youth are unmet because traditional systems do not focus on this population.

  • Prevention and treatment programs for mental health and substance abuse problems are not adequately linked.

Recommendations

9.1 The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), National Institutes of Health (NIH) (National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse [NIAAA], National Institute on Drug Abuse [NIDA], and National Institute of Mental Health [NIMH]), and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) should identify exemplary models of coordinated systems of care for children and adolescents.

9.2 The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), National Institutes of Health (NIH) (National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse [NIAAA], National Institute on Drug Abuse [NIDA], and National Institute of Mental Health [NIMH]), and the Health Research and Services Administration (HRSA) should identify exemplary models of linking behavioral health treatment and prevention programs for children and adolescents to address suicide, substance abuse, and other areas.

9.3 The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), National Institutes of Health (NIH) (National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse [NIAAA], National Institute on Drug Abuse [NIDA], and National Institute of Mental Health [NIMH]), and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) should support research to identify the elements of developmentally appropriate treatment that should be available to adolescents who are abusing alcohol or drugs or who have mental health problems.

9.4 The public and private systems must make efforts to develop service capabilities to meet the needs of adolescents who are abusing alcohol or drugs and adolescents who have mental health problems.

10. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES

Findings
  • Practice guidelines are developed by professional organizations, managed care organizations, and other groups. The development of guidelines is not always systematic, and guidelines are not always linked to empirical findings. Little or no information is available on successful strategies for implementing guidelines.

  • Accreditation tends to measure whether plans or managed care organizations have guidelines in place and does not address the quality of the guidelines



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