Appendix A

Committee Biographies

LAWRENCE W. GREEN, Dr.P.H. (Chair), is director of the Institute of Health Promotion Research and professor of health care and epidemiology at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Green received his degrees in public health at the University of California at Berkeley. He worked as a health educator in local, state, and federal health agencies in California and for the Ford Foundation in Dhaka, East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). During the Carter Administration, Dr. Green served as the first director of the U.S. Office of Health Information and Health Promotion. In this position, he helped coordinate the first Surgeon General's Report on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and the 1990 Objectives for the Nation, established the National Health Information Clearinghouse, and initiated a variety of national surveys, campaigns, and federal research and demonstration programs in disease prevention and health promotion. He has served on the public health faculties at the University of California at Berkeley, The Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, and the University of Texas. During his tenure as the Kaiser Family Foundation's vice-president and director of the health promotion program, the program received the Foundation Award of the National Association of Prevention Professionals. Dr. Green has received numerous honors and is the author of some 200 chapters, monographs, and articles. Four of his books have been widely adopted as college textbooks. He is on the editorial boards of eight journals in the health sciences, and past president of the Society for Public Health Education.

NOREEN M. CLARK, Ph.D., is dean of the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Marshall H. Becker Professor of Public Health. Her research specialty is self-management of chronic disease, and she has



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Linking Research and Public Health Practice: A Review of CDC's Program of Centers for Research and Demonstration of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Appendix A Committee Biographies LAWRENCE W. GREEN, Dr.P.H. (Chair), is director of the Institute of Health Promotion Research and professor of health care and epidemiology at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Green received his degrees in public health at the University of California at Berkeley. He worked as a health educator in local, state, and federal health agencies in California and for the Ford Foundation in Dhaka, East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). During the Carter Administration, Dr. Green served as the first director of the U.S. Office of Health Information and Health Promotion. In this position, he helped coordinate the first Surgeon General's Report on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and the 1990 Objectives for the Nation, established the National Health Information Clearinghouse, and initiated a variety of national surveys, campaigns, and federal research and demonstration programs in disease prevention and health promotion. He has served on the public health faculties at the University of California at Berkeley, The Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, and the University of Texas. During his tenure as the Kaiser Family Foundation's vice-president and director of the health promotion program, the program received the Foundation Award of the National Association of Prevention Professionals. Dr. Green has received numerous honors and is the author of some 200 chapters, monographs, and articles. Four of his books have been widely adopted as college textbooks. He is on the editorial boards of eight journals in the health sciences, and past president of the Society for Public Health Education. NOREEN M. CLARK, Ph.D., is dean of the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Marshall H. Becker Professor of Public Health. Her research specialty is self-management of chronic disease, and she has

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Linking Research and Public Health Practice: A Review of CDC's Program of Centers for Research and Demonstration of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention conducted many large-scale evaluations of health education and promotion programs. Dr. Clark has served as president of the Society for Public Health Education, and chair of the Public Health Education Section of the American Public Health Association (APHA). She is a member of the Coordinating Council of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Dr. Clark is a member of the board of directors of the American Lung Association (ALA) and has chaired the ALA Technical Advisory Group on Asthma and Lung Diseases Care and Education Committee. She also serves as the editor of Health Education Quarterly, a preeminent scholarly journal in the field of health education. She has received the Distinguished Fellow Award, the highest honor bestowed by the Society for Public Health Education; the Derryberry Award for outstanding contribution to health education in behavioral science, given by APHA; the Health Education Research Award, conferred by the National Asthma Education Program for leadership and research contributions; and the Distinguished Career Award in Health Education and Promotion, given by APHA. Dr. Clark has extensive international experience and serves as a member of several international nonprofit organizations. JOHN W. FARQUHAR, M.D., is director of the large, multidisciplinary Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, the C. F. Rehnborg Professor of Disease Prevention in the Stanford University School of Medicine, and professor of medicine and of health research and policy. In 1971, he began the Stanford three-community study, the first controlled, comprehensive, community-based study of chronic disease prevention, followed by the ongoing Stanford five-city project. The research and dissemination methods used in these studies have been disseminated worldwide. Dr. Farquhar has received many honors including the Dana Award for Public Education, the National Cholesterol Award for Public Education, and the Research Achievement Award of the American Heart Association. Most recently he chaired the writing of the 1992 Victoria Declaration, in which international experts formulated 64 policy recommendations for worldwide reduction of cardiovascular disease. He serves as the chair of an international committee to implement the declaration 's policy recommendations. MARY DES VIGNES-KENDRICK, M.D., M.P.H., is director of the City of Houston Department of Health and Human Services. She completed her medical degree at Meharry Medical College, pediatric residency at Baylor College of Medicine, and master of public health degree at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston. She served as instructor and assistant professor in the department of community medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, medical director at Northside Health Center, and assistant director of personal health services at the Houston Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. des Vignes-Kendrick is board-certified in pediatrics. She is involved in public health issues at the local, state, and national levels and is the 1996 president of the National Association of County and City Health Officials.

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Linking Research and Public Health Practice: A Review of CDC's Program of Centers for Research and Demonstration of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention IRA S. MOSCOVICE, Ph.D., is a professor and associate director of the Institute for Health Services Research at the University of Minnesota. He has written extensively on the use of health services research to improve health policy decisionmaking in state government and rural health care delivery systems. He is director of the Rural Health Research Centers at the University of Minnesota, funded by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. In 1992, he was the first recipient of the National Rural Health Association 's Distinguished Researcher Award. Dr. Moscovice received his doctoral degree in operations research from Yale University. JAMES O. PROCHASKA, Ph.D., is director of the Cancer Prevention Research Consortium and professor of clinical and health psychology at the University of Rhode Island. He is the author of over 100 publications, including three books. Dr. Prochaska is the developer of the stage model of behavior change. He has been the principal investigator on over $40 million in research grants on prevention of cancer and other chronic diseases. Dr. Prochaska serves as a consultant to the American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heath maintenance organizations, major corporations, and numerous universities and research centers. He has been an invited speaker at many regional, national, and international meetings and conferences. RANDY SCHWARTZ, M.S.P.H., is director of the division of community and family health of the Maine Department of Human Services. In this capacity he is responsible for health promotion and education, maternal and child health, dental health, and public health nursing. Mr. Schwartz oversees the community health promotion/chronic disease prevention program; the diabetes control project; cardiovascular disease prevention program; cancer prevention and control, including the breast and cervical cancer prevention and control program; and tobacco prevention and control, including a contract from the National Cancer Institute to implement the ASSIST Program (American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention) in Maine, for which he is the principal investigator. Other programs for which Mr. Schwartz is responsible are teen and young adult health, injury and disabilities prevention, prenatal preventive programs, oral health, nutrition, and administrative support for public health nursing. He also served as director of the diabetes control project, which is widely recognized for its pioneering work in third-party coverage for diabetes self-management education. Mr. Schwartz has written and spoken on community interventions for health promotion, third-party reimbursement and financing for health education, quality assurance for health promotion and education, and policy and advocacy approaches in health promotion. He is past president of the Association of State and Territorial Chronic Disease Program Directors and the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Health Promotion and Public Health Education, and is the president of the Society for Public Health Education. He is also a member of the Health

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Linking Research and Public Health Practice: A Review of CDC's Program of Centers for Research and Demonstration of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Education Quarterly and the journal, Family and Community Health. He was a guest editor of the 1995 Health Education Quarterly theme issue on “Policy Advocacy Interventions for Health Promotion and Education. ” He has a master of science in public health degree from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a bachelor of science degree with a concentration in community and school health education from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. LEE SECHREST, Ph.D., is professor of psychology at the University of Arizona. He has held previous positions at Pennsylvania State University, Northwestern University, Florida State University, and the University of Michigan. He was head of the department of pychology at the University of Arizona from 1984–1989 and was director of the Center for Research on the Utilization of Scientific Knowledge at the University of Michigan from 1980– 1984. He has served as president of the divisions of clinical psychology and evaluation, measurement, and statistics of the American Psychological Association and of the American Evaluation Association. HAROLD C. SOX, JR., MD., is chairman of the department of medicine and the Joseph M. Huber Professor of Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School. He is a graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Medical School. After completing a residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, he spent two years conducting research in immunology at the National Institutes of Health and three years at Dartmouth Medical School, where he served as chief medical resident and began his studies of medical decisionmaking. Dr. Sox then spent 15 years on the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine, where he served as chief of the division of general internal medicine and director of ambulatory care at the Palo Alto Medical Center. He returned to Dartmouth as Joseph M. Huber Professor of Medicine and chair of the department of medicine in 1988. Dr. Sox directs the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Physician Initiative at Dartmouth. He is a regent of the American College of Physicians and chairs its education committee. Dr. Sox recently chaired the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the Institute of Medicine Committee to Study HIV Transmission Through Blood Products. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1993. His books include Medical Decision Making and Common Diagnostic Tests: Selection and Interpretation. He is a member of the editorial board of the New England Journal of Medicine and is an associate editor of Scientific American Medicine. KENNETH E. WARNER, Ph.D., is the Richard D. Remington Collegiate Professor of Public Health in the department of health management and policy, University of Michigan School of Public Health. He is also associate director of the University's Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program. An economist, Dr. Warner has focused his research on economic and policy aspects of disease prevention and health promotion, with a special emphasis on smoking and health. He served as the senior scientific editor of the 25th

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Linking Research and Public Health Practice: A Review of CDC's Program of Centers for Research and Demonstration of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention anniversary surgeon general's report on smoking and health, Reducing the Health Consequences of Smoking: 25 Years of Progress. Dr. Warner has been cited twice by Delta Omega, the national public health honorary society, for “outstanding achievement in public health. ” He received the Surgeon General's Medallion from Dr. C. Everett Koop in 1989. In 1990, he received the Leadership Award of the Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs Section of the American Public Health Association. In 1991, Dr. Warner was elected to a four-year term as a senior fellow in the Michigan Society of Fellows. He was a senior fellow at the University of Michigan 's Institute of Gerontology in 1989– 1990, a Kellogg national fellow from 1980 to 1983, and a visiting scholar at the National Bureau of Economic Research at Stanford University during 1975– 1976. In 1996 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine and named a fellow of the Association for Health Services Research.

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