APPENDIX
3

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

RAYMOND C. LOEHR, Chair, has been the H. M. Alharthy Centennial Chair and professor of civil engineering at The University of Texas in Austin since 1985. Previous to this appointment, he taught environmental engineering and had major research programs at Case Institute of Technology, University of Kansas, and Cornell University. He is a former chair of EPA's Science Advisory Board and presently a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Loehr obtained B.S. and M.S. degrees from the Case Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of Wisconsin. He has been a member of the National Academy of Engineering since 1983.

SANDRA ARCHIBALD is associate dean and associate professor at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota. Prior to these appointments, she taught at the Food Research Institute of Standford University. Dr. Archibald obtained her B.A. and M.S. degrees in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in agricultural economics from the University of California, Davis.

JOHN I. BRAUMAN is the J. G. Jackson - C. J. Wood Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1963. His research interests are in organic chemistry and physical chemistry; gas-phase ionic reactions and spectroscopy; visible and infrared spectroscopy and photochemistry; electron photo-detachment spectroscopy; and reaction mechanism. He obtained his B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He has been a member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1976.



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Building a Foundation for Sound Environmental Decisions APPENDIX 3 Biographical Sketches of Committee Members RAYMOND C. LOEHR, Chair, has been the H. M. Alharthy Centennial Chair and professor of civil engineering at The University of Texas in Austin since 1985. Previous to this appointment, he taught environmental engineering and had major research programs at Case Institute of Technology, University of Kansas, and Cornell University. He is a former chair of EPA's Science Advisory Board and presently a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Loehr obtained B.S. and M.S. degrees from the Case Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of Wisconsin. He has been a member of the National Academy of Engineering since 1983. SANDRA ARCHIBALD is associate dean and associate professor at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota. Prior to these appointments, she taught at the Food Research Institute of Standford University. Dr. Archibald obtained her B.A. and M.S. degrees in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in agricultural economics from the University of California, Davis. JOHN I. BRAUMAN is the J. G. Jackson - C. J. Wood Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1963. His research interests are in organic chemistry and physical chemistry; gas-phase ionic reactions and spectroscopy; visible and infrared spectroscopy and photochemistry; electron photo-detachment spectroscopy; and reaction mechanism. He obtained his B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He has been a member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1976.

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Building a Foundation for Sound Environmental Decisions JOHN D. BREDEHOEFT retired in 1994 as deputy assistant chief research hydrologist at the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey after 32 years of service. He now runs his own consulting firm, the HYDRODYNAMICS Group. At the USGS, he engaged in both research and high-level management. He managed the entire USGS water research activities for five years in the 1970s, and was the regional manager for all USGS water activities (regional hydrologist) in eight western states for four years in the early 1980s. He received his B.S.E. from Princeton University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in geology from the University of Illinois. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. GEORGE P. DASTON is currently the principal research scientist in developmental and reproductive toxicology at the Miami Valley Laboratory of the Procter & Gamble Company in Ohio. Concurrently, he is an adjunct associate professor of pediatrics at the Children's Hospital Research Foundation at the University of Cincinnati. His research interests are developmental biology; teratology and toxicology, especially mechanisms of normal and abnormal development; nutrient-toxicant interactions; in vitro alternatives in teratology and toxicology; functional teratology; fluid balance in development; and risk assessment. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in developmental biology and teratology from the University of Miami. KENNETH L. DEMERJIAN is director of the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center and professor of atmospheric science at the State University of New York at Albany. His research interests include the chemistry and mechanistic processes of clean and polluted troposphere; kinetic and mechanistic pathway studies of atmospheric species; computer models for simulating air quality and atmospheric processes; and instrumentation development for the measurement of trace atmospheric constituents. He holds a B.S. from Northeastern University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Ohio State University. NINA V. FEDOROFF is the Willaman Professor of Life Sciences and director of the Biotechnology Institute at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Fedoroff's research areas are plant transposable elements, epigenetic mechanisms, and plant development. She holds a B.S. in biology and chemistry from Syracuse University and a Ph.D. in molecular biology from Rockefeller University. She has been a member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1990. ROLF HARTUNG is professor of environmental toxicology at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. His research interests include effects of polluting oils on waterfowl; toxicity of aminoethanols; coactions between chlorinated hydrocarbon.

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Building a Foundation for Sound Environmental Decisions pesticides and aquatic pollutants; environmental dynamics of heavy metals; and risk assessment. He received his B.S., M.W.M., and Ph.D. in wildlife management from the University of Michigan. JAMES F. HAYS retired in 1995 as director of the Division of Earth Sciences at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Prior to joining the NSF in 1982, he was professor of geology and chair of the Department of Geological Sciences at Harvard University. Dr. Hays's research interests are experimental petrology and the petrology of lunar and terrestrial igneous rocks. He was a principal investigator in the Apollo lunar sample program and has served as advisor to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, Bureau of Mines, Forest Service, Department of Energy, and the National Academy of Sciences. He received his A.B. from Columbia University, M.S. from the California Institute of Technology, and Ph.D. from Harvard. CHARLES E. KOLB is president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Research, Inc., in Massachusetts. At Aerodyne since 1971, his principal research interests have included atmospheric chemistry, combustion chemistry, chemical lasers, materials chemistry, and the chemical physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes. He has served on a variety of National Research Council committees dealing with environmental issues, chaired the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry, and serves on the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. He received his S.B. in chemical physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his M.A. and Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Princeton University. JUDITH MCDOWELL is a senior scientist and coordinator of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's Sea Grant Program. Her research works are in the areas of comparative physiology of marine larval and post larval crustaceans, including studies of energetics and nutrition; coastal pollution; and the effects of pollutants on the physiology of marine animals. Dr. McDowell is a member of the National Research Council's Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. She received a B.S. in biology from Stonehill College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in zoology from the University of New Hampshire. JUDITH MEYER is a professor at the Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia. Her expertise is in stream ecology, and her research includes nutrient dynamics in stream ecosystems, with emphasis on dissolved organic carbon and phosphorus; ecosystem analysis of blackwater rivers; effects of watershed disturbance on aquatic ecosystems; functional assessment of urban streams; and role of riparian zones in controlling nonpoint pollution sources. She has served on several National Research Council committees and is a former member of the Water Science

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Building a Foundation for Sound Environmental Decisions and Technology Board. She obtained her B.S. from the University of Michigan, M.S. from the University of Hawaii, and Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Cornell University. CHARLES RICHARD O'MELIA is currently a professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. O'Melia's professional experience includes positions at Hazen & Sawyer Engineers; University of Michigan; Georgia Institute of Technology; Harvard University; and the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. His research interests are in aquatic chemistry, environmental fate and transport, predictive modeling of natural systems, and theory of water and wastewater treatment. He received a B.C.E. from Manhattan College and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of Michigan. Dr. O'Melia has been a member of the National Academy of Engineering since 1989. GARY WILLIAMS is director of the Naylor Dana Institute and chief of the Division of Pathology and Toxicology, American Health Foundation. He is also a research professor in the Department of Pathology, New York Medical College. Dr. Williams is editor of Cell Biology and Toxicology and also serves on the editorial boards of Toxicologic Pathology, Drug and Chemical Toxicology, Archives of Toxicology, and Nutrition and Cancer. His research fields are the genetic, toxic and carcinogenic effects of chemicals, on which he has over 410 publications. He received his B.A. from Washington and Jefferson College and his M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. ROY WOLFE is associate director of water quality at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Previously, he has been associated with the University of California, Irvine. He has had 15 years of experience in water quality, with particular emphasis on microbiology. He received a B.A. in zoology from San Diego State University and a Ph.D. in environmental science from the University of California, Irvine. LILY YOUNG is a professor at the Center for Agricultural Molecular Biology and the Department of Environmental Science at Cook College, Rutgers University. Formerly, Dr. Young taught at Stanford University and at the New York University Medical Center. She has served on various review and oversight panels including two other National Research Council committees, one for the Marine Board and one for the Naval Board. She obtained a B.S. and an M.S. in bacteriology from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in environmental microbiology from Harvard University.

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Building a Foundation for Sound Environmental Decisions THOMAS ZOSEL is manager for environmental initiatives at 3M's Corporate Environmental Technology and Services Department. He currently serves on EPA's Clean Air Act Advisory Committee and chairs the National Pollution Prevention Center Advisory Board. He was past chair of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' Center for Waste Reduction Technologies. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin. Staff MORGAN GOPNIK, study director, is assistant director of the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources and director of the Ocean Studies Board at the National Research Council. She received a B.Sc. in physical geography from McGill University and an M.S. in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology.