Biographical Sketches

JAMES P. SMITH (Chair) holds the RAND chair in labor markets and demographic studies and was the director of RAND's Labor and Population Studies Program from 1977 to 1994. He has led numerous projects, including studies of immigration, the economics of aging, black-white wages and employment, the effects of economic development on labor markets, wealth accumulation and savings behavior, and the interrelation of health and economic status among the elderly. He is currently co-principal investigator for a pilot project for a new, cost-effective survey that yields adequate sample size of the foreign-born, has known sampling properties, permits longitudinal analyses, and can answer policy questions of particular relevance to immigration. He is a member of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and is the public representative appointed by the governor on the California OSHA Board. He has received the National Institutes of Health MERIT award, its most distinguished honor granted to a researcher. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago.

ALAN J. AUERBACH is Robert D. Burch professor of economics and law and director of the Burch Center for Tax Policy and Public Finance at the University of California, Berkeley. He previously taught at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was chair of the Economics Department. In 1992 he served as deputy chief of staff of the U.S. Joint Committee on Taxation. His research has addressed fiscal theory and policy, business finance and investment, the effects of tax provisions on firm behavior, and the impact of changing demographics on fiscal balance. A fellow of the Econometric Society, he testifies frequently



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--> Biographical Sketches JAMES P. SMITH (Chair) holds the RAND chair in labor markets and demographic studies and was the director of RAND's Labor and Population Studies Program from 1977 to 1994. He has led numerous projects, including studies of immigration, the economics of aging, black-white wages and employment, the effects of economic development on labor markets, wealth accumulation and savings behavior, and the interrelation of health and economic status among the elderly. He is currently co-principal investigator for a pilot project for a new, cost-effective survey that yields adequate sample size of the foreign-born, has known sampling properties, permits longitudinal analyses, and can answer policy questions of particular relevance to immigration. He is a member of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and is the public representative appointed by the governor on the California OSHA Board. He has received the National Institutes of Health MERIT award, its most distinguished honor granted to a researcher. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. ALAN J. AUERBACH is Robert D. Burch professor of economics and law and director of the Burch Center for Tax Policy and Public Finance at the University of California, Berkeley. He previously taught at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was chair of the Economics Department. In 1992 he served as deputy chief of staff of the U.S. Joint Committee on Taxation. His research has addressed fiscal theory and policy, business finance and investment, the effects of tax provisions on firm behavior, and the impact of changing demographics on fiscal balance. A fellow of the Econometric Society, he testifies frequently

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--> before Congress and has consulted for the U.S. Treasury, the Office of Management and Budget, the Finance Ministries of Sweden and New Zealand, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank. He has a B.A. from Yale University and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. GEORGE J. BORJAS is a professor of public policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; he is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Prior to joining the Harvard faculty, he was a professor of economics at the University of California, San Diego. He has conducted extensive research on many facets of the economic impact of immigration and has written widely on immigration-related issues both for scholarly journals and the popular press. His current research interests include immigration, the role of ethnicity in the U.S. economy, and the impact of international trade on the labor market. He has a bachelor's degree in economics and mathematics from St. Peter's College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Columbia University. BARRY EDMONSTON is a study director with the Committee on Population. He has been involved in demographic research and teaching at Stanford University and Cornell University, and he was senior research associate with the program for research on immigration policy at the Urban Institute. For the Committee on National Statistics of the National Research Council, he was study director for a panel study on the U.S. census, and also for workshops on immigration statistics and on federal standards for race and ethnicity classification. He has done research on demographic methods, especially on the methodology of population projections, and on questions of immigration and immigration policy. He has a Ph.D. in demography from the University of Michigan. J. THOMAS ESPENSHADE is professor of sociology and a faculty associate of the Office of Population Research at Princeton University. He was formerly senior research associate and director of the program in demographic studies at the Urban Institute. He is the coauthor of The Fourth Wave: California's Newest Immigrants and editor of Keys to Successful Immigration: Implications of the New Jersey Experience. He is a member of the academic advisory board for the new immigrant survey at RAND and of the Social Science Research Council's postdoctoral awards committee for the program on international migration; he served on the National Research Council's Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs. His research interests include patterns of undocumented migration to the United States, the fiscal impacts of new immigrants, and attitudes toward U.S. immigration. He is currently directing a study on the contributions of immigrants to the science and engineering workforce in the United States. He has a B.A. in economics from the College of Wooster, an

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--> M.A.T. in mathematics from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University. RICHARD B. FREEMAN holds the Ascherman chair of economics at Harvard University. He is currently serving as faculty co-chair of the Harvard University trade union program. He is program director of the National Bureau of Economic Research's program in labor studies and executive director of the program in discontinuous economics at the London School of Economics, a major program in economic analysis using neural nets and new data mining tools. His research interests are youth labor market problems, crime and the labor market, higher education, trade unionism, transitional economies, high-skilled labor markets, economic discrimination, social mobility, and income distribution and equity in the marketplace. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, president of the Society of Labor Economists, and vice-president of the American Economic Association. He has served on three other panels of the National Research Council, on high-risk youth, postsecondary education and training in the workplace, and employment and technical change. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. JOHN F. GEWEKE is professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Minnesota and adviser to the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. He was previously director of the Institute of Statistics and Decision Sciences at Duke University and professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Wisconsin. He is a member of the Committee on National Statistics of the National Research Council and is currently chair of its panel to evaluate the research program of the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Statistical Association. His research has included time series and Bayesian econometric methods and applications in macroeconomics and labor economics. He has a B.S. from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Minnesota. CHARLES HIRSCHMAN is professor and chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Washington, Seattle. He was previously on the faculty at Cornell University and Duke University. His primary research interests include comparative race and ethnic relations, with a particular interest on immigration and ethnic stratification in the United States, and demographic change in Southeast Asia. He is currently the chair of the Committee of International Migration of the Social Science Research Council and vice president of the Population Association of America. He received has a B.A. from Miami University (Oxford, Ohio) and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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--> ROBERT P. INMAN is a professor of finance and economics, University of Pennsylvania, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His published research includes articles on urban fiscal policy, health care finance, tax policy, and political economy. He is the editor of the Economics of Public Services (with Martin Feldstein) and Managing the Service Economy. He has been a visiting professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University and a research fellow at Harvard University, the Australian National University, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. He has an A.B. from Harvard College, an M.Ed. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. GUILLERMINA JASSO is professor of sociology at New York University. She was founding director of the theory workshop at the University of Iowa and directs the methods workshop at New York University. Earlier she served as special assistant to the commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (1977-1979) and as director of research for the U.S. Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy (1979-1980). Her work is in the areas of international migration, distributive justice, the general scientific theory of behavior, and methods of both theoretical and empirical analysis. She is a member of the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars and of the Sociological Research Association. She has served on many advisory boards, including panels advising the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. Currently she is chair-elect of the theory section and of the international migration section of the American Sociological Association. She has a B.A. from Our Lady of the Lake College, an M.A. in sociology and anthropology from the University of Notre Dame, and a Ph.D. in social relations from Johns Hopkins University. RONALD D. LEE is professor of demography and economics at the University of California, Berkeley, and director of the Center for Economics and Demography of Aging there. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and chair of the National Research Council's Committee on Population. His recent research examines intergenerational transfers of resources, and he also works on methods for forecasting population, merging these interests in work on stochastic forecasts of the finances of the social security system. He has also worked on various topics in historical demography. He has a B.A. from Reed College, an M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. KRISTIN McCUE served as research associate for the panel's study. A labor economist, she was an assistant professor in the Economics Department at Texas

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--> A&M University from 1989 to 1995. She is now employed at the Congressional Budget Office. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. MARY C. WATERS is professor of sociology at Harvard University. She is the author of two books and numerous articles on racial and ethnic identity and immigrant assimilation. Her current research focuses on the racial and ethnic identities of Caribbean immigrants in the United States, patterns of assimilation among young adult children of immigrants from a wide variety of countries in New York City, and patterns of racial intermarriage and identity formation in the United States. She has been a consultant to the Census Bureau on issues of measurement of race and ethnicity and is a member of the review panel of the social sciences and population section of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. She has been a Guggenheim fellow, a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation and is a member of the international immigration committee of the Social Science Research Council. She has a B.A. in philosophy from Johns Hopkins University, an M.A. in demography, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. FINIS R. WELCH is distinguished professor of economics and Abell professor of liberal arts at Texas A&M University. Earlier he was on the research staff of the National Bureau of Economic Research (as director of the program in income distributions) and RAND (as founding director of the labor and population studies program). He is currently chair of Unicon Research, chair of STATA Corp., and president of Welch Consulting. He has specialized in teaching and research on determinants of wage earnings and employment. This work has variously addressed group differences: black/white differences in earnings, female/male differential, Hispanic/Anglo differences, etc. More recently the work has focused on determinants of employment and ages of retirement and of the growth in wage inequality. He has been on the faculty of the University of Chicago, Southern Methodist University, the City University of New York (as executive officer of the Ph.D. program in economics), and the University of California, Los Angeles. He has a Ph.D. is economics from the University of Chicago.

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